CURRENT Exhibit:

NOTE: Exhibit End Dates subject to change.

Pronunciation Guide: Karpeles Museum

Quote of the Month:

You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist.           Indira Gandhi


Fairfield Hall

 

2410 Fairfield Ave., Fort Wayne, IN 46807 

(260) 456-6929

Fort Wayne Fairfield Hall  Hours:
Tuesday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays)

Current Exhibit:

(April 18, 2018 - August 31,2018 ) 

Robert Fulton and the United States Navy

Robert Fulton, (1765-1815),  was an inventor, engineer, and artist who brought steamboating from the experimental stage to commercial success. He also designed a system of inland waterways, a submarine, and a steam warship. 

 Having learned to read and write at home,  Fulton was sent at age eight to a Quaker school; later he became an apprentice in a Philadelphia jewelry shop, where he specialized in the painting of miniature portraits on ivory for lockets and rings. Local merchants, eager to raise the city's cultural level, financed his passage to London in 1787.  There he became acquainted with new inventions for propelling boats: a water jet ejected by a steam pump and a single, mechanical paddle.

Fulton turned his principal efforts toward  canal engineering. His Treatise on the Improvement of Canal Navigation, in 1796, dealt with a complete system of inland-water transportation based on small canals extending throughout the countryside. He included details on inclined planes for raising boats.

He travelled in 1797 to Paris, where he proposed the idea of a  submarine, the "Nautilus," to be used in France's war with Britain; it would creep under the hulls of British warships and leave a powder charge to be exploded later. The French government rejected the idea, however, as an atrocious and dishonourable way to fight.

In 1800 he was able to build the "Nautilus" at his own expense; he conducted trials on the Seine and finally obtained government sanction for an attack, but wind and tide enabled two British ships to elude his slow vessel.  

In 1801 Fulton met Robert R. Livingston, a member of the committee that drafted the U.S. Declaration of Independence. Before becoming minister to France, Livingston had obtained a 20-year monopoly of steamboat navigation within the state of New York. The two men decided to share the expense of building a steamboat in Paris using Fulton's design--a side paddlewheel, 66-foot- (20-metre-) long boat, with an eight-horsepower engine of French design. Although the engine broke the hull, they were encouraged by success with another hull. Fulton ordered parts for a 24-horsepower engine from Boulton and Watt for a boat on the Hudson, and Livingston obtained an extension on his monopoly of steamboat navigation.  

 

Returning to London in 1804,  Fulton advanced his ideas with the British government for submersible and low-lying craft that would carry explosives in an attack. Two raids against the French using his novel craft, however, were unsuccessful. In 1805, after Nelson's victory at Trafalgar, it was apparent that Britain was in control of the seas without the aid of Fulton's temperamental weapons. In the same year, the parts for his projected steamboat were ready for shipment to the United States, but Fulton spent a desperate year attempting to collect money he felt the British owed him.  

Arriving in  New York in December 1806, Fulton at once set to work supervising the construction of the steamboat that had been planned in Paris with Livingston. He also attempted to interest the U.S. government in a submarine, but his demonstration of it was a fiasco. By early August 1807 a 150-foot- (45-metre-) long "Steamboat," as Fulton called it, was ready for trials. The 150-mile trial run from New York to Albany required 32 hours (an average of almost 4.7 miles per hour). The passage was epic because sailing sloops required four days for the same trip.  

After building an enginehouse, raising the bulwark, and installing berths in the cabins of the now-renamed "North River Steamboat," Fulton began commercial trips in September. He made three round trips fortnightly between New York and Albany, carrying passengers and light freight. Problems, however, remained: the mechanical difficulties, for example, and the jealous sloopboatmen, who through "inadvertence" would ram the unprotected paddlewheels of their new rivals. During the first winter season he stiffened and widened the hull, replaced the cast-iron crankshaft with a forging, fitted guards over the wheels, and improved passenger accommodations. These modifications made it a different boat, which was registered in 1808 as the "North River Steamboat of Clermont," soon reduced to  "Clermont" by the press.  

Fulton was a member of the 1812 commission that recommended building the Erie Canal. With the English blockade the same year, he insisted that a mobile floating gun platform be built--the world's first steam warship--to protect New York Harbor against the British fleet. The  "Demologos," or "Fulton," as the ship was alternately called, incorporated new and novel ideas: two parallel hulls, with paddlewheel between; the steam engine in one hull, and boilers and stacks in the other. It weighed 2,745 displacement tons and measured 156 feet in length; a slow vessel, its speed did not exceed 6 knots. Launched in October 1814, the heavily gunned and armoured steamship underwent successful sea trials but was never used in combat


ADDITIONAL DISPLAY ITEMS:

"Shout out"
We would like to give a huge "THANK YOU" to the Old Fort!!! They have alowed us to display six (6) 8' posters the "War of 1812" - which include FULL COLOR American artwork....
which has been given to them (on Loan) from the United States Naval Museum!!!
This is a great opportunity to see the "War of 1812" through the perspective eyes of the U.S. Navy.



(on loan from Ben Clark)

The African-American Calendar of Historical Figures
other references:


SPECIAL ADDITIONS:

- JUNGLE BOOK:A copy of the original corrected typed draft of the book..and....A copy of Disney's drawing of "Mowgli"

- The Homestead Act and Indiana map (there is also a copy at the Old Fort along with a copy of a Dutch Drawn Map from 1739...showing the area of "New France", that would later become Fort Wayne.) 

- Egyptian Sandstone Carvings covering the time frame of Ahmose, Thutmosis I, Amenhotep IV, Amenhotep III,Amenhotep II, Amenhotep I (whose father died slightly after the birth of Moses according to Biblical chronology), Thoth (the Egyptian god of writing), and Hieroglyphics on a Ushabti Doll (1570 B.C. - 1342 B.C)


- Models of some of the great Sailing ships including replicas of a Egyptian Bireme , the U.S.S. Constitution, and more.....


- The Final Indian Peace Treaty Between the United States and Every Indian Tribe in the United States. The Declaration of Allegiance of the American Indians to the United Sates which includes a few pages of the thumb prints of all of the Indian Tribe leaders.

- The First Female President of The United States of America: Edith Bolling Wilson. Not officially voted into office, but never the less ran the Executive Branch from October 1919 to March 1921. On display is a letter that she wrote in 1933 about the depression.

- The Olympics: The Original Proposal for the FIRST MODERN Olympic Games

- The First Female Russian Cosmonaut - Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova -After 48 orbits and 71 hours, she returned to earth, having spent more time in space than all U.S. astronauts combined to that date.

Piqua Hall


3039 Piqua Ave., Fort Wayne, IN 46806

(260) 449-9551


Fort Wayne Piqua Hall  Hours: 
Tuesday-Friday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m..
Saturdays: By Appointment

(closed Saturday, undays, Mondays, Holidays)

Current Exhibit:

North West Maps of Exploration

An excellent collection of Early Maps depicting the west coast of the United States. Most date prior to the creation of the United States of America.

And.....

Hand Drawn "City View" Maps for Sebastian Munster
-JERUSALEM
-CONSTANTINOPLE
-FLORENCE
-COLN
-ROME
-COBOLENTZE
-VIENNA
-HEIDELBERG



SPECIAL DOCUMENT:
First Map of Iran - 1478
 
The Babylonians ruled the world in the sixth century B.C. Yet, afterwards, in the course of about half a century, they ceased to exist. This is remarkable enough, but it is even more astounding that their successors, the Persians, had not existed before! In 560 B.C., Cyrus the Great became the king of Persia, a small state in the Middle East, and within 30 years had replaced the Babylonian empire with his own.
 
In 597 to 586 BC, the Chaldeans (Southern Babylonians) had conquered  Jerusalem and forced the most prominent citizens of Judah: professionals, teachers priests, craftsmen, and the wealthy into exile in the city of Babylon. They kept these Jews together, hoping that the Babylonian citizens would benefit by associating with such an accumulation of so many scholars. Indeed these scholars used this period to create and put into writing the greatest book of all time, The Hebrew Bible.
 
In 538, Cyrus the Great allowed the Jews to return to Judah and Jerusalem and re-establish their identity and religion. It is amazing that The Book of Isaiah refers to Cyrus (King of what will be the future state of Iran) as the Messiah!

ALSO we have exhibits covering:

A Statue of Joan of Arc 

and

One of the few known letters by King Charles VII to have survived.




About Us:

The Karpeles Museums are a national chain with thirteen museums in the U.S., specializing in the preservation and display of original, historically significant documents and manuscripts.

Admission is always free of charge. 

Visit our national website to view the other eleven museums online:

www.karpeles.com


Please Note:

We do not do appraisals....Nor are we able to purchase.