Kings Plaza Movie Theater

    movie theater
  • A building where movies are shown to an audience; a cinema
  • cinema: a theater where films are shown
  • A theater where movies are shown for public entertainment
  • A movie theater, picture theater, film theater or cinema is a venue, usually a building, for viewing motion pictures ("movies" or "films").
    kings plaza
  • Kings Plaza is a shopping center that opened in 1970, within the Marine Park/Mill Basin section of Brooklyn, east of Flatbush Avenue.
kings plaza movie theater
kings plaza movie theater - PLAZA
PLAZA
PLAZA
THEIR FIRST MISTAKE was ever telling the world about the wonders they had found.

They should have kept it all a secret. If they’d kept it a secret, fewer people would have died. When archaeologists uncover the largest ancient safe in the world, the wrong kinds of people will show up: criminals, mercenaries, treasure hunters.

THEIR SECOND MISTAKE was opening it.

Why would an ancient culture devote three generations to build a giant stone safe? Why would they bury it so the jungle could hide it from the world? Why ritually sacrifice one hundred thousand people to ensure its secrecy?

THEIR LAST MISTAKE proved the biggest.

This last mistake hurt the most. Their last mistake was to assume that nothing had been left behind to keep guard….


Special note: PLAZA has an active table of contents, is approximately 90,000 words, and displays seamlessly with Kindles and all other eBook reading devices.

About the Author:
SHANE BROWN was born in 1974 and writes from Brisbane, Australia. He attended James Cook University, graduating with an honors degree in Biological Science and a Masters Degree in Underwater Archaeology. Shane has published multiple short stories online and in print, written two novels, and this year signed a contract selling the rights for a feature film to be based on one of his shorter works. He is currently working on his third novel: MELT.

THEIR FIRST MISTAKE was ever telling the world about the wonders they had found.

They should have kept it all a secret. If they’d kept it a secret, fewer people would have died. When archaeologists uncover the largest ancient safe in the world, the wrong kinds of people will show up: criminals, mercenaries, treasure hunters.

THEIR SECOND MISTAKE was opening it.

Why would an ancient culture devote three generations to build a giant stone safe? Why would they bury it so the jungle could hide it from the world? Why ritually sacrifice one hundred thousand people to ensure its secrecy?

THEIR LAST MISTAKE proved the biggest.

This last mistake hurt the most. Their last mistake was to assume that nothing had been left behind to keep guard….


Special note: PLAZA has an active table of contents, is approximately 90,000 words, and displays seamlessly with Kindles and all other eBook reading devices.

About the Author:
SHANE BROWN was born in 1974 and writes from Brisbane, Australia. He attended James Cook University, graduating with an honors degree in Biological Science and a Masters Degree in Underwater Archaeology. Shane has published multiple short stories online and in print, written two novels, and this year signed a contract selling the rights for a feature film to be based on one of his shorter works. He is currently working on his third novel: MELT.

Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke
Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke
Spanish postcard by EdicionesTarje Fher/Ediciones Mandolina, 1964. Photo: Walt Disney Productions. Still from Mary Poppins. English film and stage actress, singer, and author Julie Andrews (1935) was a former child actress and singer who rose to prominence starring in such stage musicals as My Fair Lady and Camelot. She is best known for her roles in the films Mary Poppins (1964) and The Sound of Music (1965). Her voice spanned four octaves until it was damaged by a throat operation in 1997. In the 2000’s she had a major revival of her film career in family films such as The Princess Diaries (2001) and the Shrek animated films (2004–2010). Julie Andrews was born Julia Elizabeth Wells in Walton-on-Thames, England, in 1935. Her mother, music hall performer Barbara Wells (nee Morris), was married to Edward C. ‘Ted’ Wells, a teacher of metal and woodworking, but Andrews was conceived as a result of an affair her mother had with a family friend. With the outbreak of World War II, Barbara and Ted Wells went their separate ways. Ted Wells assisted with evacuating children to Surrey during the Blitz, while Barbara joined Ted Andrews in entertaining the troops through the good offices of the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA). Barbara and Ted Wells were soon divorced. Barbara remarried to Ted Andrews in 1939. Julie had lessons at the Cone-Ripman School, an independent arts educational school in London, then with the famous concert soprano and voice instructor Lilian Stiles-Allen. She continued her academic education at the Woodbrook School, a local state school in Beckenham. Julie performed spontaneously and unbilled on stage with her parents for about two years beginning in 1945. She got her big break when her stepfather introduced her to Val Parnell, whose Moss Empires controlled prominent venues in London. Andrews made her professional solo debut at the London Hippodrome singing the difficult aria Je Suis Titania from Mignon as part of a musical revue called Starlight Roof in 1947. She played the Hippodrome for one year. In 1948 she became the youngest solo performer ever to be seen in a Royal Command Variety Performance. Julie followed her parents into radio and television and reportedly made her television debut on the BBC program RadiOlympia Showtime in 1949. She garnered considerable fame throughout the United Kingdom for her work on the BBC radio comedy show Educating Archie (1950- 1952). In 1954 on the eve of her 19th birthday, Julie Andrews made her Broadway debut portraying Polly Browne in the already highly successful London musical The Boy Friend. To the critics, Andrews was the stand-out performer in the show. In November 1955 Andrews was signed to appear with Bing Crosby in what is regarded as the first made-for-television movie, High Tor. In 1956 Julie Andrews appeared in the Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner musical My Fair Lady as Eliza Doolittle to Rex Harrison's Henry Higgins. Richard Rodgers was so impressed with her talent that concurrent with her run in My Fair Lady she was featured in the Rodgers and Hammerstein television musical, Cinderella (1957, Ralph Nelson). Cinderella was broadcast live and attracted an estimated 107 million viewers. She married set designer Tony Walton in 1959 in Weybridge, Surrey. They had first met in 1948 when Andrews was appearing at the London Casino in the show Humpty Dumpty. The couple filed for a divorce in 1967. In 1960 Lerner and Loewe again cast her in a period musical as Queen Guinevere in Camelot, with Richard Burton. However movie studio head Jack Warner decided Andrews lacked sufficient name recognition for her casting in the film version of My Fair Lady; Eliza was played by the established film actress Audrey Hepburn instead. As Warner later recalled, the decision was easy, "In my business I have to know who brings people and their money to a movie theatre box office. Audrey Hepburn had never made a financial flop." Andrews played the title role in Disney's Mary Poppins (1964, Robert Stevenson), a lavish musical fantasy that combined live-action and animation. Walt Disney had seen a performance of Camelot and thought Andrews would be perfect for the role of the British nanny who is "practically perfect in every way!" Andrews initially declined because of pregnancy, but Disney politely insisted. Andrews and her husband headed back to the United Kingdom in 1962 for the birth of daughter Emma Katherine Walton. As a result of her performance in Mary Poppins, Andrews won the 1964 Academy Award for Best Actress and the 1965 Golden Globe Award. She and her Mary Poppins co-stars also won the 1965 Grammy Award for Best Album for Children. As a measure of ‘sweet revenge’, as Poppins songwriter Richard M. Sherman put it, Andrews closed her acceptance speech at the Golden Globes by saying, "And, finally, my thanks to a man who made a wonderful movie and who made all this possible in the fir
Annie Cordy
Annie Cordy
German postcard by UFA, no. FK 3557. Retail price: 25 Pfg. Photo: Arthur Grimm / Central Europa / Prisma. Publicity still for Viktor und Viktoria/Victor, Victoria (1959, Karl Anton). Energetic and zany Annie Cordy (1928) starred in more than 30 French film operettas, comedies and dramas. The Belgian actress and singer made over 300 records, and did 4000 live appearances world-wide, including several memorable concerts at Paris’ most famous venue, L’Olympia. Annie Cordy was born as Leonie Cooreman in Laeken (according to IMDb: Schaerbeek, Brussels), Belgium in 1928. Her parents were Jan Cornelius Cooreman and Maria de Leeuw. She had a brother, Louis, and a sister, Jeanne. At 8, her mother enrolled her in a dance class. She studied piano and music theory. While studying she performed at charity galas. Between her dance numbers, she sang popular hits. At 16, she won the talent contest Grand Prix de la Chanson in 1944. She made her official stage debut in Brussels at the B?uf sur le toit and performed throughout Belgium. In 1950,the artistic director of the Paris’ biggest cabaret, Lido, invited her to come to Paris. In 1951, she met Francois-Henri ‘Bruno’ Bruneau, who became her manager and in 1958 her husband too. In 1951 and 1952, Cordy starred in big revues at the Lido, but also at the ABC and the Moulin Rouge cabarets. In 1952, she accompanied the Tour de France cycle race, an event which had huge mass appeal and which, at the time, attracted as many show business personalities as sportsmen. As RFI notes: “The event brought popular acclaim for the young singer who received the Maurice Chevalier award at Deauville. She was already admired for her versatile talents as singer, revue artist and above all zany comedienne.” In 1952, Annie Cordy made her stage debut in the operetta La Route fleurie (The Flowered Road) by Francis Lopez and Raymond Vinci, with Georges Guetary and Bourvil. The show was an enormous hit and ran at the AC Theatre in Paris for three years. In 1954 she performed for the first time at Paris most famous venue, L’ Olympia. Many memorable concerts would follow. A year later she also received the Grand Prix de l' Academie Charles-Cros for the song Oh, Bessie!, a melancholy tribute to jazz singer Bessie Smith. Cordy started to record songs for Pathe-Marconi and her version of La Ballade de Davy Crockett was number 1 in the charts for five weeks in France in August 1956. Other hits were La petite Marie (Little Mary), Les trois bandits de Napoli (The three bandits of Naples) and Leon (Leo). In 1957, she sang at the wedding of Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier III of Monaco. It lead to an American contract and she went on a world tour and performed at the Plaza in New York, La Copacabana in Rio de Janeiro, in Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico etc. Back in France, she played with Jean Richard in the operetta Tete de linotte, which ran until 1960. In the cinema Annie Cordy made her first appearance in in the star-studded cast of the super-production Si Versailles m'etait conte/Affairs in Versailles (1953, Sacha Guitry). Then she played opposite Bourvil and Louis de Funes in the comedy Poisson d'avril/April Fools (1954, Gilles Grangier), and the musical comedy Bonjour sourire/Hello smile (1955, Claude Sautet) with Henri Salvador. After the success of the film operetta Chanteur de Mexico/The Mexican Singer (1956, Richard Pottier) with the ‘prince of operetta’ Luis Mariano and Bourvil. It was followed by a string of light entertainment films, including Tabarin (1957, Richard Pottier) with Michel Piccoli, Cigarettes, Whisky et P'tites pepees/Cigarettes, Whiskey and Wild Women (1958, Maurice Regamey), and Tete folle/Madcap (1959, Robert Vernay). During the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s, she appeared in some 30 French films, musical comedies but also dramas. In 1969, she was a revelation as a dramatic actress in the thriller Le passager de la pluie/Rider on the Rain (1970, Rene Clement) in which she played the role of the mother of Marlene Jobert. She confirmed her dramatic talent with fine roles in Le Chat/The Cat (1971, Pierre Granier-Deferre) with Jean Gabin and Simone Signoret, the drama Rue Haute/High Street (1976, Andre Ernotte), and the Belgian drama Un ete apres l'autre/One summer after another (1989, Anne-Marie Etienne). Sandra Brennan writes at AllMovie: “In films she usually plays feisty women who live life to the fullest. She also has demonstrated considerable talent as a dramatic actress as can be seen in the 1994 film La vengeance d'une blonde/Revenge of a Blonde.” She also played a dramatic role in the hugely successful television series, Orage d'ete/Summer storms (1989, Jean Sagols). In the 1990’s her appearances were mostly on television, and she recorded and toured less. In 1992, the album Oh la la, quelle soiree! was released, a mixture of new recordings of old hits and new material. In 1998 she celebrated her 70th birthday and published her autobiography. She also released a compila
kings plaza movie theater
kings plaza movie theater
Ojos de Fuego (Los Jet de Plaza y Janes, Biblioteca de Stephen King, Vol. 102, No. 4) (Spanish Edition)
Charlie es una nina rubia, de ojos azules, educada y carinosa. Pero tambien es piroquinetica. Si, puede encender fuego a distancia, desde inofensivas fogatas hasta hogueras capaces de arrasar amplias extensiones. Y si posee estas capacidades a los siete anos, horroriza pensar en sus poderes destructores cuando sea adulta. Aunque, la verdad, tiene pocas probabilidades de llegar a la edad adulta. Porque el servicio secreto norteamericano encargado de realizar investigaciones cientificas y paracientificas para su aplicacion militar, ha decidido estudiar a Charlie y luego eliminarla, tal como estudio y elimno a sus padres despues de haberlos utilizado en sus experimentos...