Breast Cancer Facts

KEY STATISTICS
  • 1 in 9 women in Canada is expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime (by the age of 90)

  • 1 in 4 (26%) cancers diagnosed in women in Canada are breast cancer

  • 1 in 30 women in Canada will die from breast cancer

  • In Canada, the 5-year survival rate for breast cancer is 88%

  • Breast cancer mortality rates have decreased by 43% since the peak in 1986

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BREAST CANCER IN CANADA 2010

Breast cancer continues to be the most common cancer among Canadian women.

Incidence Breast cancer incidence is the number of new cases diagnosed in a population over a specific time period.

 In 2010, an estimated 23,200 women in Canada will be diagnosed with breast cancer, an increase of 500 from 2009. On average, 445 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every week.

  • Estimated number of new cases of breast cancer in females by age (2010):
  • 6,600 breast cancer cases diagnosed in women 70+
  • 5, 800 breast cancer cases diagnosed in women 60-69
  • 6,200 breast cancer cases diagnosed in women 50-59
  • 3, 500 of breast cancer cases are diagnosed in women 40-49
  • 950 breast cancer cases are diagnosed in women under the age of 40

 In 2010, an estimated 180 men in Canada will be diagnosed with breast cancer. The incidence of breast cancer in men has remained unchanged since 2009. Men with breast cancer make up a little less than 1% of all cases.

Mortality

 In 2010, an estimated 5,300 women and 50 men will die from breast cancer in Canada. On average, 100 Canadian women will die of breast cancer every week. This has remained unchanged since 2009.

Trends

 One in nine (11%) Canadian women are expected to develop breast cancer during her lifetime (this means by age 90).

 Female breast cancer incidence rates appear to be fairly consistent across Canada.

 There is more cause to be optimistic. Since 1999, the incidence of breast cancer in Canada has stabilized. Since 1986, the breast cancer death rate has fallen by more than 30% and is currently the lowest it has been since 1950. The significant improvement in survival rates for women with breast cancer since the mid-1980s is likely a result of improvements in screening and advances in treatment.

 At present, the five-year relative survival rate for female breast cancer in Canada is 87% (84% for men) which means that women diagnosed with breast cancer have an 87% likelihood of living for 5 years after their diagnosis.

Source: Canadian Cancer Society /National Cancer Institute of Canada. Canadian Cancer Statistics 2010, Toronto, Canada, 2010


Comments