Men of Wofford's Georgia Brigade


What we know as Wofford's Georgia Brigade was the 16th Georgia, 18th Georgia, 24th Georgia, Cobb's Legion, Phillip's Legion, and later in the war the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters.  These regiments did not begin the war together.  For example the 18th Georgia were a part of the famous Texas Brigade of General John Bell Hood until just before the Battle of Fredericksburg when the Confederate War Department authorized the formation of the Georgia Brigade.  Another example is Phillip's Legion which was part of the Army of the Kanawha which was with General Robert E. Lee's West Virginia Campaign before joining the Georgia Brigade. 

The below men, with a few exceptions, are not ancestors of mine.  My goal was to bring together as many photographs as possible of this great brigade to one page.

BRIGADE COMMANDERS


General Howell Cobb began the war as colonel of the 16th Georgia. Soon after he was appointed brigadier general of a brigade that contained the 16th Georgia, 24th Georgia, and Cobb's Legion which was raised by Cobb's own brother T.R.R. Cobb.  Along with these Georgia units were regiments from Mississippi, Louisiana, and North Carolina. Following the Battle of Antietam, Cobb was transferred to the District of Middle Florida. In this department he would serve organizing coastal defense and militia recruitment. He would perform field service again in Georgia contesting William T. Sherman's March to the Sea.



Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb began the war by personally organizing his own personal "legion".  A legion in Civil War terms consisted of several companies of infantry, cavalry, and artillery grouped into one unit.  The legions that were formed were not accepted into Confederate service and instead were broken up by branch of service and attached to like units.  They did, with the exception of the artillery, keep their name so there were both a cavalry and infantry unit known as "Cobb's Legion".  Cobb's Legion (Infantry).  TRR Cobb served as colonel of the legion while attached to his older brother's brigade.  When Howell Cobb was transferred, TRR Cobb became the commander of the newly formed "Cobb's Georgia Brigade".  Their first major action as a brigade was defending Marye's Heights at the Battle of Fredericksburg.  During the battle a shell fragment struck Cobb in the thigh severing an artery.  He bled to death soon after.

William Tatum Wofford (1st Cousin, 5 times removed) began the war as a captain in the 18th Georgia. He was soon promoted to colonel of the regiment and it was attached to Hood's Texas Brigade.  Wofford would lead his regiment in some of the most severe fighting of the war.  At Gaines' Mill his regiment helped break the federal line and effectively ended the "Seven Days Battles". At 2nd Manassas, the 16th Georgia was part of General James Longstreet's flank attach which crushed the Federal left.  At Antietam the 18th Georgia was part of the Corn Field fight along with the Texans.  It is said that the Texans adopted the 18th Georgia (and the Palmetto Legion of South Carolina which was also in the Texas Brigade) and accepted them as honorary Texans.  Before the Battle of Fredericksburg the 18th became part of Cobb's Georgia Brigade.  After TRR Cobb's death, Wofford was promoted to Brigadier General and took over command at what became known as Wofford's Georgia Brigade.  He would lead the brigade from Fredericksburg through Spotsylvania Court House where he was wounded a second time.  He then resigned and took command of the District of North Georgia which was the position he held until the end of the war.

Dudley M. DuBose began the war with the 15th Georgia Infantry.  He would lead the regiment as part of Benning's Georgia Brigade and would fight in that capacity until the Battle of Spotsylvania at which he would command the entire brigade in General Benning's absence. At that time he was promoted to brigadier general and would replace General William T. Wofford and take command of Wofford's Georgia Brigade.  He would lead the brigade at the Siege of Petersburg and would eventually be captured, with the majority of his brigade, and the Battle of Sailor's Creek just a few days before the end of the war.


16th GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

  • Company A: Madison County — "Madison County Grays"
  • Company B: Jackson County — "Center Hill Guards"
  • Company C: Hart County — "Hartwell Infantry"
  • Company D: Madison County — "Danielsville Guards"
  • Company E: Habersham County — "Cobb Infantry"
  • Company F: Walton County — "__________"
  • Company G: Jackon County — "Jackson Rifles & Oconee Volunteers"
  • Company H: Gwinnett County — "Flint Hill Grays"
  • Company I: Gwinnett County — "__________"
  • Company K: Columbia County — "Ramsey Volunteers"


Goode Bryan began the war as a captain and then the lieutenant colonel of the 16th Georgia. He would serve in that capacity until just after the Battle of Gettysburg when he was promoted to brigadier general and took command of another Georgia brigade which had been commanded by John Paul Semmes. He would resign his commission during the Siege of Petersburg due to ill health.


Captain Augustus Columbus Thompson of Jackson County's Company G of the 16th Georgia.  He was shot in the left hip at the Battle of Crampton's Gap and had to resign.  He spent the rest of his life in Florida.



2nd Lieutenant Horatio J. David of Jackson County began the war enlisting as a private in Company B. Soon after he was appointed 4th Corporal.  Before the Battle of Chancellorsville, where he was wounded, he was elected 2nd Lieutenant. He was wounded again at Deep Bottom during the Siege of Petersburg which resulted in the loss of an eye. He resigned in January of 1865. 


2nd Lieutenant Elias Sander Dyer was a church deacon and the deputy sheriff of Hart County, Georgia.  He became 2nd Lieutenant of Company C and would be captured at the Battle of Crampton's Gap.  He would be exchanged then wounded at either the Battle of the Wilderness or Spotsylvania Court House.  He died of his wounds on June 6, 1864 while at Camp Winder in Richmond.



Captain Horatio Goss McMullan enlisted with Hart County's Company C of the 16th Georgia as a 1st Lieutenant.  He was promoted in September of 1863 to th rank of Captain and was killed at the Battle of the Wilderness.


Pvt. General W. Davis enlisted in Gwinnett County's Company I as a private.  He was wounded in the eye and the foot at the Battle of Chancellorsville which cost him the sight in one eye and his middle toe from his left foot.  In June of 1863 he transferred to the 3rd Battalion, Georgia Sharpshooters.



John Addison Cobb began the war as a private in the 2nd Battalion Georgia Infantry but after 4 months transferred to Company H of the 16th Georgia.  He became the quartermaster sergeant of the regiment then aide-to-camp of General Howell Cobb in early 1862. In late 1863 he also took on the role of Adjutant General and surrendered in Macon, Georgia.



1st Sergeant Alexander Ambrose Timmons enlisted with Company F of the 16th Georgia.  He would be wounded at the Battle of Fort Sanders then again at the Battle of the Wilderness.  He would survive the war and immediately move west to Texas where he lived until 1912.   


Pvt. Jackson Hilliard Randolph (GG Grandfather) enlisted with Company G of the 16th Georgia. He would survive the war and lived in Hall County, Georgia until his death in 1914.



Captain Nathan L. Hutchins, Jr. of Gwinnett County enlisted with Company I of the 16th Georgia and was elected captain.  When the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters were formed he was made Liuetenant Colonel and served in that capacity until he was captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek.  After the war he held many notable positions in local politics including representative to the Georgia Assembly, director of the Georgia Rail Road, and trustee for the University of Georgia.  He died in 1905 in Lawrenceville, Georgia.



Captain William E. Simmons began the war as 1st Lieutenant in Company I of the 16th Georgia.  He transferred to the 3rd Battalion Georgia Infantry and rose to the rank of Major.  He was captured at the Battle of Front Royal in mid-1864 and sent to Fort Delaware where he was imprisoned until the end of the war.  In his post-war life he was a representative in the Georgia General Assembly and a member of the State University Board of Regents.  He died in 1931 in Lawrenceville, Georgia.


18th GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY


  • Company A: Cobb County — "Acworth Infantry"
  • Company B: Newton County — "Newton Rifles"
  • Company C: Jackson County — "Jackson County Volunteers"
  • Company D: Dougherty County — "Davis Invincibles"
  • Company E: Gordon County — "Stephens Infantry"
  • Company F: Bartow County — "Davis Guards"
  • Company G: Bartow County — "Lewis Volunteers"
  • Company H: Bartow County — "Rowland Highlanders"
  • Company I: Dooly County — "Dooly Light Infantry"
  • Company K: Bartow County — "Rowland Infantry"


SOLON Z. RUFF was a graduate of the Georgia Military Institute and was a professor at the institute until the war began. He enlisted and was appointed lieutenant colonel of the 18th Georgia.  He would lead the regiment from the beginning with the Texas Brigade until the reorganization.  Ruff was killed at the Battle of Fort Sanders in Knoxville, Tennessee on November 29, 1863.
His father was Martin L. Ruff, owner of Ruff's Mill which became site to a battle on July 3, 1864.



Captain D. L. Garret of Jackson County enlisted as a Captain in Company C of the 18th Georgia.  He would serve until being mortally wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas. 



Captain James I. Lemon of Cobb County began the war as a 2nd Lieutenant. He would be promoted to 1st Lieutenant, then captain in early 1863.  He was at Fort Sanders and became one of the "Immortal 600".  He was release from Fort Delaware at the end of the war and lived in Cobb County until his death in 1917.



Pvt. William Benton Wofford (Cousin 5X Removed) began the war enlisted in Company H of the 18th Georgia.  When the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters were formed he was transferred to Company A of that regiment.  He would survuve the war and eventually move to Florida where he died in 1909.



Private Milton Barrett of Cobb County enlisted with Company A of the 18th Georgia.  He would be transferred to the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters and be made 3rd Corporal.  He was captured at the Battle of Front Royal and would die of variola in Elmira Prison.  He is buried there



2nd Lieutenant William H. H. Walters began the war as a Private with Company H of the 18th Georgia. He was wounded at the Battle of Antietam in September of 1862. He was promoted to 1st Sergeant, then elected to 2nd Lieutenant in October of 1864.  In January of 1865 he returned home to serve as Aide-de-Camp for General Wofford.  After the war he live in Floyd County where he died in 1912.














24th GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY



Captain Joseph N. Chandler of Banks County began the war as Captain of Company A of the 24th Georgia.  In January of 1864 he would become Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. He would serve in that position until September of 1864 when he resigned. After the war he moved to Texas and worked as a minister before being elected to the Texas State Legislature.  He died in Hood County, Texas in 1920.


Colonel Christopher Columbus Sanders began the war as Lieutenant Colonel of the 24th Georgia.  In early 1864 he was made Colonel of the regiment. He would be wounded at Spotsylvania Court House then captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek.  After the war he moved to south Georgia, then to Gainesville, Georgia where he was a prominent businessman, served on the Board of Education, and was a trustee of Brenau College.  He died in 1908 and is buried in Gainesville.



Pvt. Henry Whitfield of Banks County enlisted with Company A of the 24th Georgia.  He was wounded at the Battle of Crampton's Gap in September of 1862.  When the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters was organized he became part of Company B of that regiment.  After the war he moved to Arkansas where he died in 1873.



Captain George Washington Keeling, Sr. of Franklin County began the war as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company H of the 24th Georgia.  In January of 1862 he was elected Captain of the company but by August of that year he resigned due to old age. After the war he moved to Texas where he died in 1888.



Pvt. Christopher Garrison of Banks County enlisted with Company A of the 24th Georgia.  He only appears on the rolls of 1861 but is rumored to have died in 1863.



Captain Phillip E. Davant of Hart County enlisted with Company B of the 24th Georgia.  He transferred to the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters upon its formation and became a Major. He then transferred to the 38th Georgia Infantry and became a Lieutenant Colonel.  He was captured at the Battle of Spotsylvania and exchanged two months later.  He rejoined the 38th and served through to Appomattox.  After the war and for the remainder of his life he was a school teacher and principal.  He died in 1906 in Taylor County, Georgia.



Pvt. James Francis Cain enlisted with Gwinnett County's Company F of the 24th Georgia.  He was wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg in December of 1862. He was captured at the Battle of Cedar Creek in October of 1864.  He was paroled at Point Lookout and there is no later record. After the war he was a farmer in northern Gwinnett County where he died in 1902.









COBB'S LEGION

Captain William Walker McDaniel of Bowdon, Georgia enlisted with Company B of Cobb's Legion as a 1st Lieutenant. He would be wounded twice, one of which was at the Battle of Chancellorsville. He would survive the war and move to Clopton, Alabama where he died in 1892.


Pvt. James H. L. Benford of Bowdon began the war with Company B of Cobb's Legion but was soon thereafter discharged for disability.  He reenlisted with the 10th Georgia Cavalry and survived the war.  He died in Carroll County, Georgia in 1904.



2nd Lieutenant Samuel Augustus Burney of Morgan County enlisted as a private with Company B of Cobb's Legion. He was elected 2nd Lieutenant in October of 1862. He was wounded, probably at Fort Sanders in late 1863. The wound disabled him and his service records state he was on detached order by authority of the Secretary of War.  After the war he remained in Morgan County and was a baptist minister.  He died in 1896.



Pvt. Samuel J. Brown of Bowdon, Georgia enlisted with Company B of Cobb's Legion.  His service records provide few details but he did have time in Jackson Hospital in Richmond for a "left arm fracture, paralysis, and nausea" but returned to duty.  He died in Carroll County in 1913.




PHILLIP'S LEGION



Captain Daniel B. Sanford enlisted as a private before being promoted through the ranks.  He became Captain of Company A in May of 1864.  At the Battle of Sailor's Creek he was wounded in the leg and left on the battlefield.  He was picked up by the federals and sent to a hospital in Washington D.C. His later life was spent occupying many local Baldwin County and Milledgeville offices. He died in 1912 in Milledgeville.




Pvt. Jesse Monroe Pendley of Cobb County enlisted at the age of 24.  He was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg and Cold Harbor. He survived the war to spend the remainder of his life in Alabama and died in 1909.


Pvt. Robert P. Burnett of Cobb County enlisted with Company A of Phillip's Legion.  He served through the war until he was captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek only days before the end of the war and was send to Camp Lookout. After the war he would move to Arkansas and die in 1878. The picture is probably a pre-war militia image due to the uniform.



Pvt. Wesley F. Wagnon began the war with the 6th Alabama Infantry.  He was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines then joined the 53rd Alabama Partisan Rangers. He then transferred to Phillip's Legion Company A in order to serve alongside his brother, Eugenius Wagnon.  He was killed in action at either the Battle of the Wilderness or Spotsylvania Court House.



Pvt. John Williams enlisted as a private in Company A.  He was born in Bavaria and his parents emigrated to New York when John was one year old.  By the start of the war he was living with an uncle in Georgia and enlisted.  At the end of the war he moved back to New York and died in 1921.



Pvt. Robert H. Baker enlisted with Dalton's Company B of Phillip's Legion.  Baker was in and out of hospitals with illnesses before being severely wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville.  He was then deemed unfit for duty and sent to the Quartermaster Department of Charleston.  He would die in Whitfield County in 1921.


Pvt. William T. Carter enlisted with Dalton's Company B of Phillip's Legion. In October of 1862 he was detailed to the Signal Corps.  He would survive the war and move to Texas where he lived to the age of 91, dying in 1932.



Pvt. Eugene T. Kingsley enlisted with Dalton's Company B of Phillip's Legion. Kingsley would contract Typhoid Fever and die in West Virginia only three and a half months after enlisting.




Bandmaster Carl Franz August Rauschenberg was born in Rauschenberg, Germany and came to Georgia in 1848.  He enlisted with Company B of Phillip's Legion as a private but soon raised a regimental band. He would serve until being captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek.


Captain Alexander Erwin Smith enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant with Company C of Phillip's legion.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in late 1862 and was wounded in the arm at Chattanooga on October 24, 1863. He was then promoted to Captain of Company C was forced to retire from service due to his wound.  After the war he would marry the daughter of Howell Cobb and became a judge in Athens, Georgia.  He died in 1907.


3rd Corporal John Miller Ervin enlisted with Company C of Phillip's Legion. Became ill and was sent to Jackson Hospital in Richmond where he became a nurse in mid-1864.  He returned to the legion and was captured at Sailor's Creek.  After returning home he moved to northwestern Tennessee where he lived until 1916 when he was killed in a timber accident.


Pvt. Virgil B. Brown enlisted with Company D of Phillip' Legion.  He was wounded at Gettysburg in the leg and again at Cold Harbor in the leg.  While on furlough at home in Van Wert he was captured in his uniform and executed as a spy in Burnt Hickory, Georgia.



1st Lieutenant Abraham "Ham" Jones enlisted with his older brother's infantry unit that would become Company C of Phillip's Legion.  He was killed in action at the Battle of Fox's Gap, a few days before Antietam.


1st Corporal Augustus Franklin Boyd enlisted with Company E of Phillip's Legion.  In mid-1862 he transferred to his father's new unit which became the 52nd Georgia Infantry.  He began with that regiment as a Sergeant Major and eventually would become a Captain at age 18.  He was killed in action at the Battle of Champion's Hill on May 16, 1863.


Pvt. John H. Dowdy enlisted with Lumpkin County's Company E of Phillip's Legion.  Dowdy would die on consumption and pneumonia fever in Red Sulpher Springs, West Virginia on December 2, 1861.



Coatesworth C. Hamilton was a cadet of the Georgia Military Academy in Marietta, Georgia.  The cadets at GMI were tasked with training the recruits who often times were twice the cadet's ages.  Hamilton joined the Legion as a assistant to his brother who was captain of Company E.  He would contract a disease in late 1861 and die during the West Virginia Campaign.



Lieutenant Colonel Joseph E. Hamilton enlisted with Company E of Phillip's Legion.  He was wounded at the Battle of Fox's Gap in his left arm and again at Fort Sanders in his right arm. He was wounded again in the neck at the Battle of Cold Harbor. After recovering he rejoined the Legion and was captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek.  He was sent to Johnson's Island and was released in July of 1865.  After the war he would move to California where he would die in 1907.


Sgt. William J. T. Hutcheson began the war as a private in Lumpkin County's Company E of Phillip's Legion.  Hutcheson would be wounded in the leg at 2nd Manassas, the thigh at Chancellorsville, and lost a finger at Spotsylvania.  After the war he operated a grocery store, was a superintendent of a gold mine, and was tax collector of Lumpkin County before dying in 1922. 



Lieutenant American Ford Johnson began the war with the 10th Alabama Infantry.  At the Battle of Gaines' Mill he was wounded in the hip. In early 1863 he transferred to Company L of Phillip's Legion to join his brother who was the captain.  Johnson would be wounded in the foot at the Battle of Gettysburg.  At the Battle of Fort Sanders he would be wounded in the hip, thigh, and shoulder. Resigned due to his wounds and he appears to have moved about the state in his later life.  He seemed to have been suffering from his wounds and was not able to work while living in Haralson County in 1897.



Captain James M. Johnson began the war commanding Company L of Phillip's Legion.  He would be wounded in the thigh at Fox's Gap and captured but exchanged after only a month.  He was wounded again at Fredericksburg, this time in the foot.  While leading the charge at Fort Sanders he was shot through the body and died in Federal hospital that afternoon.


1st Lieutenant William Rhadamanthus Montgomery was afraid he would miss the war when it first broke out.  He left his home for South Carolina and enlisted in the 2nd South Carolina Infantry to get into the war as soon as possible.  After his enlistment expired he returned home and reenlisted in Company L of Phillip's Legion. He would serve with the Legion until the creation of the 3rd Battalion, Georgia Sharp Shooters and became 1st Lieutenant of that unit. After the war he lived in Marietta and was Clerk of the Superior Court and County Treasurer. He died in 1906 and is buried in the Marietta city cemetery.



Pvt. Light Heckleman Wilmoth enlisted first with Company M of Phillip's Legion but was placed in Company L.  He served through the war as a private with no significant injury.  He survived and lived in Marietta where he died young in 1886.


Pvt. John Pleasant Bryan began the war by enlisting in the 7th Georgia Infantry. He was wounded at the Battle of 1st Manassas and returned home where he reenlisted with Company M of Phillip's Legion. He would eventually be capture at Fox's Gap and Knoxville, both times exchanged.  His next record shows him in a Richmond hospital at the end of the war.  After the war he moved to Cullman County, Alabama and died there in 1925.



Pvt. Samuel Drake enlisted with Company M of Phillip's Legion and was from the Lost Mountain District of Cobb County.  He was mortally wounded in the shoulder at the Battle of Fredericksburg and died in a Richmond Hospital.



3rd Sergeant Enoch R. Edwards was born in Spartanburg, South Carolina and moved to Cobb County where he enlisted in Company M of Phillip's Legion.  He would serve throughout the war until being captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek just days before the end of the war.  He would live until 1913 and is buried in Gainesville, Georgia.



Pvt. Mark Reeves enlisted with Company M of Phillip's Legion and would serve in that capacity for the duration of the war suffering no serious wounds. Reeves returned to the Marietta area and lived until 1918.



Captain Henry Johnson McCormack began the war as a private in the 1st Confederate Infantry for a 12 month enlistment.  He returned home and enlisted in Company O of Phillip's Legion and became a 2nd Lieutenant. At Pocataligo, South Carolina he was accidentally shot in the foot and his leg was amputated above the ankle. He became and enrolling officer and later a captain.



Pvt. Samuel Hunter Scott began the war as a private in Company O of Phillip's Legion. He would serve in that capacity until the Legion moved with the rest of Longstreet's Corps to Georgia in late 1863.  While there he was reported to be AWOL but appears on the rosters of the 1st Georgia Cavalry as newly enlisted.  He would serve with this unit, rising to the rank of Lieutenant, and survive the war.  After the war he moved to Texas where he died in 1910.



Surgeon William F. Shine began the war with a Florida, then a South Carolina regiment. In mid 1863 he became the surgeon of Phillip's Legion and later chief surgeon of Wofford's Brigade.  After the war he graduated from the University of Georgia and practiced medicine in St. Augustine, Florida.  He died there in 1910.





Many of the pictures here of Phillip's Legion men are from the excellent website of Mr. Kurt Graham.  The web address is http://www.angelfire.com/tx/RandysTexas/page4.html


 










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