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Gannett

Stats & Intro
Peak Name
Gannett Peak
WY Elevation & Prominence Rank
 1
 Contiguous US Prominence Rank  15
 Contiguous US Elevation Rank  132
 Elevation 13804' 
 Prominence 7074' 

Dates: 8/1-3/2009
Distance: ~42 miles
Elevation Gain: ~10,200’
Time: 55 hours
Trailhead: Pole Creek
Participants: Brian Kalet, Colin Fain, Evan Blumberg & Wes Lloyd

Our plan was to climb Gannett Peak in three days.  We drove to the Pole Creek Trailhead late Friday night and were surprised to see so many cars in the large parking lot. We quickly set up camp and went to sleep.

Day 1

We started the 17 mile hike to Titcomb Basin via the Pole Creek Trail, Seneca Lake Trail, India Basin Trail and Titcomb Basin Trail Saturday morning carrying ropes, snow pickets and ice screws. I spoke with climbers descending that stated they used a rope to cross the bergshcrund above the Gooseneck Glacier. Luckily, I ran into fellow climbers Sarah and Dominic, who claimed no rope was currently necessary for Gannett and that there was a snowbridge across the bergschrund. We arrived at our idyllic campsite in Titcomb Basin 8 hours after departing from the trailhead. I decided to sleep under the stars since the weather looked favorable; I was welcomed by the moonrise and a great display of stars.

Colin, Wes & Evan, from left to right, making final preparations. Photo: Brian Kalet

The Wind Rivers from near Photographers Point. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Fremont Peak from near Photographers Point. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Barbara Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Hobbs Lake. Photo: Brian Kalet

Fremont Peak & Jackson Peak from Seneca Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Little Seneca Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Mount Woodrow Wilson from Island Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Fremont Peak from Island Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Colin & Evan, from left to right, above Titcomb Lakes. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Moonrise over Mount Sacagawea. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Day 2

We all slept in and leisurely prepared for the ascent, not leaving camp until 7 am. First, we approached Bonney Pass on foot, then put on crampons and started climbing frozen snow to Bonney Pass. Looking back, we had great views of Mount Helen. At the top of the pass, we got our first full view of our objective. We took off our crampons to begin the descent to the Dinwoody Galcier, but after seeing continuous snow, quickly re-donned crampons for the descent. Traversing the Dinwoody Glacier was easy, seeing only a few benign crevasses. After reaching the northern end of the Dinwoody Glacier, we traversed north on talus to the Gooseneck Glacier. We then climbed moderately steep snow to towards Gooseneck Pinnacle. We crossed the bergschrund at the base of the Gooseneck Couloir, then climbed the couloir to gain Gannett's south ridge. We followed the south ridge on a mixture of rock and snow to the final summit ridge. The summit ridge had some decent exposure, but was easy. In short time we were at the summit four hours and forty minutes after leaving our camp in Titcomb Basin. We were surprised we so no other parties en route and enjoyed nearly perfect weather on the summit for 45 minutes before heading down the ridge. The descent was uneventful, but we were cautious with to monitor balling on our crampons. We arrived back at camp 9 and a half hours after leaving in the morning. We ate, drank and celebrated our climb.

Our campsite in Titcomb Basin. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Bonney Pass. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Climbing Bonney Pass with Mount Helen in the background. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Titcomb Lakes from Bonney Pass. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Gannett Peak from Bonney Pass. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Gannett Peak, Gooseneck Glacier and Dinwoody Glacier from Bonney Pass. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Colin & Evan on the Dinwoody Glacier. Bonney Pass in the background. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Brian, Colin & Evan approaching the northern end of the Dinwoody Glacier. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Evan & Colin traversing to the Gooseneck Glacier with Dinwoody Glacier & Bonney Pass in the background. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Brian, Evan & Colin, from right to left, approaching the snowbridge over the bergschrund above Gooseneck Glacier. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Evan & Colin, from left to right, climbing the Gooseneck Couloir. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Colin, Brian, Wes & Evan, from left to right, at the summit. Photo: Colin Fain

Brian in front of Turret Peak, Mount Warren, Doublet Peak & Dinwoody Peak, from left to right. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Brian descending the summit ridge. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Evan & Colin descending the summit ridge. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Gannett Peak and its hanging snowfield from its south ridge. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Looking down to the Dinwoody Canyon. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Brian descending the south ridge with Turret Peak, Mount Warren, Doublet Peak & Dinwoody Peak, from left to right, in the distance. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Colin & Evan, from left to right, descending the Gooseneck Couloir. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Gannett Peak, showing the crown and debris from a slab avalanche, taken from Bonney Pass. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Day 3

The next morning we all slept in again and slowly broke down camp. We started for the trailhead at 10 am. On the hike out, we passed many parties, which made us feel lucky not only for good weather, but solitude.

East Twin Peak, West Twin Peak & Mount Woodrow Wilson from Island Lake. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Brian, Colin & Evan, from front to back, descending the Seneca Lake Trail above Seneca Lake with Fremont Peak & Jackson Peak in the background. Photo: Wes Lloyd

The Wind Rivers from near Photographers Point. Photo: Wes Lloyd

Map. Annotation: Brian Kalet
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