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                                                          from MY UROHS


 

To Linda Rabon Torres  

EMELIHTER KIHLENG 

 

How often do you shoot off your .22-caliber rifle?

Do you always shoot into your backyard jungle or do you sometimes shoot up in to the night sky? Perhaps aiming for a bird or a star?

I bet you are one of those people who fires off a couple of rounds every New Year after you’ve finished off a 6-pack of Bud.

You would never admit to this now, but on the inside, did you secretly want to shoot someone, like one of those Chuukese neighbors of yours?

One of those Micronesians always causing trouble in your little “peaceful” Yigo neighborhood?

One of those stealers, pugua  chewers, heavy drinkers without any indoor plumbing?

What did you think was in your backyard jungle that April evening that made you pull out that rifle of yours?

Was it really those darn dogs always fighting and barking?

Did you hear the pig squeal?


Torres is a woman from Yigo, Guam who fired her .22-caliber rifle into her backyard jungle to supposedly scare off wild pigs and dogs, killing a 14-year-old Chuukese boy, A.C. Kaselen on April 17, 2006. The case was initially dismissed, but she was re-indicted in September 2007, and pleaded guilty to charges of negligent homicide (Pacific Daily News, September 6, 2007). Kaselen’s family believes that justice was slow because they are Chuukese (PDN, June 16, 2006).     

Pugua is the Chamorro word for betel nut.