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Research

From time to time, research is conducted that is directly related to the activities of search and rescue using canines. Below are some abstracts of ongoing research that is being conducted.

Title

Methamphetamine Contaminant

Authors

Kelly, K.R., C.E. Melvin, V.Ayers, R. Bouet, L. Bouet, S. Everett & M.Appleton. 2009. Unpublished material

Abstract

In February, 2007, a search dog did not give a trained indication to a cadaver reportedly under the influence of methamphetamine when last seen alive. Debriefing indicated that methamphetamine contamination may block the deceased odor pattern.

Three cross-trained dogs were exposed to methamphetamine contaminated human remains in two blind trials including negatives, uncontaminated human remains, and live samples. None indicated the presence of contaminated samples or negatives but indicated 100% of other samples.

Upon subsequent imprinting to methamphetamine samples, the dogs indicated its presence from 75% to 100%.

      

 Title

Can a flower smell like a dead human?

 Authors

Garcher, K., S. Williams, K. R. Kelly & C. E. Melvin. 2009. High School International Science Fair entry. Reno, NV. Unpublished material.

 Abstract

The purpose was to determine if fresh-cut herbaceous flowers were capable of transporting water containing dissolved human scent. The experiment used carnations, (Dianthus caryophyllus), cross trained search dogs, human remains scent samples and human blood samples. The carnation’s ability to transport substances was determined by allowing the flower stalks to soak in the test solution, then recording the trained indications made by the search dogs. The preliminary results of this project were; 66 % of the flowers soaked in human scent for 48 hours were located, and 50 % of the flowers soaked for 168 hours were located, using 3 dogs. One dog found 100% in all trials.

  

 Title

Search & Rescue Trailing Canines Using Aged Blood Scent Articles

 Authors

Chuck Morris, North American Search Dog Network and SCEMK9

 Abstract

Download article (MS Word)