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Drugs and Their Possible Side Effects

Part 3:  Medications To Help Make Bladder Expressing Easier

There is no substitute for good veterinary care.

  This information is for educational purposes only and

should NOT be used in place of consultation with your veterinarian.

 

 

When Things Don’t Work Right!

 

 

Usually, after learning the exact technique, figuring out the perfect timing, and getting into a routine, expressing going very smoothly.  Learning to express a dog’s bladder can be challenging enough but when a dog’s sphincter simply doesn’t want to cooperate, it can be very difficult or nearly impossible. There can be many reasons why a paralyzed dog’s sphincter does not open easily due to nerve damage from a disc episode; but don’t worry, we won’t go into all the technical details of what may have happened.  Let’s just say that urination is actually a complex function requiring several different sets of muscles both in the bladder and sphincter to all work together properly, and that doesn’t always happen with a paralyzed dog or a dog with nerve damage. Muscle spasms in the sphincter can make expressing very difficult. The good news is that there are medications that can help.  Many dogs don’t ever need these drugs at all; but occasionally, some dogs do. For those dogs that do, these medications can really help.

 

 

Phenoxybenzamine

 

Phenoxybenzamine relaxes the urethral sphincter muscles, which can relax the urethra, allowing urine to pass more easily.

 

 

Reasons Why Your Dog May Not Be Able To Take Phenoxybenzamine:

 

If your dog has heart or kidney problems your dog may not be able to take phenoxybenzamine.

 

 

Possible Side Effects Your Dog May Experience:

 

(Should your dog have any of these, please notify your vet immediately.)

 

    ·         Nausea

    ·         Vomiting

    ·         Low blood pressure

    ·         Weakness

    ·         Dizziness

    ·         Rapid heart beat

    ·         Dilated Pupils

 

 

Medications That Interact With Phenoxybenzamine:

 

 

    ·         Epinephrine

    ·         Phenylephrine

    ·         Reserpine

 

http://www.wedgewoodpetrx.com/learning-center/medication-information-for-pet-and-horse-owners/phenoxybenzamine-for-dogs-and-cats.html

 

 

Bethanechol Chloride

 

 

Bethanechol chloride strengthens the bladder muscle’s contractions.  If the lower sphincter is too tight or has spasms from nerve damage, this medication will help the bladder to contract harder to overcome it. If the bladder is loose due to lack of muscle strength, bethanechol chloride will help it regain strength so that it can empty urine in a controlled way rather than just leaking.

 

 

Reasons Why Your Dog May Not Be Able To Take Bethancechol Chloride:

 

Your dog probably will not be able to take benthanechol chloride if your dog has certain heart problems, low blood pressure, stomach or intestinal ulcers, over-active thyroid, urinary obstruction, weak bladder wall, epilepsy, or asthma.

 

 

Possible Side Effects Your Dog May Experience:

 

(Should your dog have any of these, please notify your vet immediately.)

 

    ·         Not wanting to eat

    ·         Nausea

    ·         Vomiting

    ·         Drooling

    ·         Need to urinate more often

 

 

Medications That Interact With Bethanechol Chloride:

 

Bethanechol chloride works well together with diazepam and/or phenoxybenzamine.

 

 

Other Info: 

 

Bethanechol chloride should be given on an empty stomach to avoid nausea and/or vomiting.

 

 

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2153

http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/bethanechol-urecholine-etc/page1.aspx

 

 

 

Prazosin

 

 

Prazosin is an older drug used to treat congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and also urethral sphincter spasms.

 

 

Reasons Why Your Dog May Not Be Able To Take Prazosin:

 

If your dog has low blood pressure or kidney failure your dog probably will not be able to take prazosin.

 

 

Possible Side Effects Your Dog May Experience:

 

(Should your dog have any of these, please notify your vet immediately.)

 

    ·         Not wanting to eat

    ·         Lack of energy and drowsiness

    ·         Nausea

    ·         Vomiting

    ·         Diarrhea

    ·         Constipation

    ·         Dilated pupils

 

 

Medications That Interact With Prazosin:

 

Most all are used to treat heart and blood pressure problems:

 

    ·         Atenolol (Tenormin)

    ·         Propranolol (Inderal)

    ·         Sildenafil (Viagra)

    ·         Verapamil

    ·         Nifedipine.

    ·         Clonidine may decrease the effects of prazosin.

 

 

Other Info: 

 

Should be given with food.

 

 

http://www.wedgewoodpetrx.com/learning-center/professional-monographs/prazosin-for-veterinary-use.html

http://www.petmartpharmacy.com/view/?ref=10203


To download a helpful Medicine Chart that will help you keep track of your dogs meds, click HERE


Continue reading about Anti-inflammatories: 

IVDD drugs and their possible side effects.

Continue reading about Pain Killers:

Drugs and their possible side effects part 2.

 

 

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©The K9BackPack, 2014.

 

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