3D Printing

(Edited by Liz Arum)



3D Printers


3D Software

Desktop 
 123D Catch  Autodesk  Scanning
 123D Design  Autodesk
 123D Make  Autodesk  
 3ds Max    
 3DSlash    
 Art of Illusion    
AutoCAD  Autodesk  
Blender    
BRL CAD    cross-platform open source solid modeling system
Burr Tools    
Cinema4D    $$$$
Design Spark Mechanical    $$$$
FreeCAD    
Geomagic Design    $$$$
Grasshopper    Algorithmic modeling for Rhino
Inventor  Autodesk  
KnotPlot    
 Leopoly    
MakeHuman      
Mathematica    
MathMod     
Maya  Autodesk  3D animation software
Memento  Autodesk converting any captured reality input (photos or scans) into high definition 3D meshes
MeshLab    
MeshMixer  Autodesk  Meshmixer 101 videos
NetFabb    Repairing
OpenSCAD    
Osirix MD    $699
Rhino    
Sculptris    
Skanect  Scanning
Sketchup    
Solidworks    
TopMod    topological mesh modeler
Wings 3D    
ZBrush    



Mac Only

 Cheetah3D   $99


Windows only

 Cubify Invent  $49
 Cubify Sculpt  $129
 IceSL  
 Makers Empire   100 1year $1000/ curriculum-aligned lesson plans (74+ hours) and full primary and middle school teachers training and support
 Seamless 3D   Open source
 SeifertView  a variety of knots and links in many different styles, and with many display options can be produced
 Truespace 5  


Cloud-based

 3DSlash  
 3DTin  needs chrome plugin
 
Blockscad
Einstein''s WorkshopDARPA open-source solid CAD/block-based openscad
 Charmr Autodesk 
 Clara.io  
 Cookie Caster  cookie cutter maker
 CubeTeam  Collaborative 3D painting and modeling
 Fusion 360 Autodesk 
 ImplicitCAD  
 OnShape  3D CAD system
 OpenJSCAD  
 Parametric Parts  
 PublishYourDesign  
ScupltFab   needs wacom tablet plugin
SculptGL  
Shapeshifter.io Autodesk 
Shapesmith  Open source
 Terrain2STL  
Tinkercad Autodesk 
Usecubes  



iPad

 123D Sculpt  
 Blockify  
 Cubify Draw  
 Leopoly  
 MakerBot PrintShop  
 Makers Empire  100 1year $1000/ curriculum-aligned lesson plans (74+ hours) and full primary and middle school teachers training and support
 Morphi  
 Novo Modeler  
 Origami Block  
 Structure  Scanning
 Tinkerplay Autodesk 
 Usecubes  



Android

 ModelAN3D  
 SubDivFormer  




Print Services





Online Repositories
Lesson Ideas


  

Math

Teachable Objects

Resources



Science

  1. Biology: Create your own species. Design a fossil or skeleton and determine its scientific classification.
  2. Biology: Print out bones, jaws,etc. and have students determine scientic classification
  3. Biology: Explore the story of how a child's skull, found in an ancient cave, helped answer one of our oldest questions: Where do we come from: Radio Lab's The Skull
    Print the Taung Child Skull
  4. Biology: How to 3D Print Proteins' guide
  5. Engineering Challenge: Recreate a model from the Reuleaux Collection of Mechanical Mechanisms at Cornell University
  6. Engineering Challenge: Create pieces for Rube Goldberg Contraption
  7. Engineering Challenge: Design a machine that implements at least one of the following:
    • inclined plane
    • lever and fulcrum
    • wedge
    • screw
    • wheel and axle
    • Pulley
  8. Explore Leonardo da Vinci's inventions.
  9. Engineering Challenge: Design a robot that can move forward using kinematics.
  10. Engineering Challenge: Design an automaton.
  11. Engineering Challenge: Design the tallest structure with moodular parts.
  12. Science and Engineering Challenge: Egg Drop Holder
    Design an Egg Drop Container Using Autodesk 123D.
  13. Balloon Racers.
  14. 3D and Museums
    Please Feel the Museum: The Emergence of 3D Printing and Scanning by Liz Neely and Miriam Langer.
  15. Light.
  16. Sound.
  17. Moving across water.
  18. DNA comb for a Gel Electrophoresis Separation
  19. Designing blades/Conservation of Energy
  20. LOW-COST 3D PRINTING FOR SCIENCE, EDUCATION & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    LOW-COST 3D PRINTING FOR SCIENCE, EDUCATION & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (iBook)
  21. Topographical maps
  22. Brdige Design: modify this bridges assignment from BEAM, U.C Berkeley's Science and Engineering Outreach Program.
  23. GIS

Teachable Objects

  1. NIH 3D Print Exchange
    3dprint.nih.gov is a community-driven resource, which provides access to a community-contributed database of bioscientific 3D printable files. Click here to browse or search the database. 
    The site is the result of a collaborative effort led by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development and the National Library of Medicine.

  2. example
    Capture the Wind

  3. Catch the Wind Competition

  4. example
    Educational Model of A Bacteriophage

  5. example
    Jet Racer

  6. example
    Articulated Arm

  7. example
    Foam Gliders

  8. example
    Dragon Fly

  9. example
    Infectious Pathogens

  10. example
    Magnetic Rack for 8, 1.5mL Tubes

  11. example
    Laboratory Pipette

  12. example
    Adjustable Volume Straw Pipette

  13. example
    Pythagorean Cup

  14. example
    Gale Crater, Mars

  15. example
    Nematocyst

  16. example
    Paddle Boat

  17. example
    BodyParts3D Foot

  18. example
    BodyParts3D Lumbar Vertebrae

  19. example
    3D Printed Single Coil Pulse Motor

  20. example
    Perpetual Motion, da Vinci Style



DESIGN PROCESS

  • Collaboration
  • Research
  • Design
  • Building
  • Testing
  • Communication


Basic steps

  1. Describe the general situation or problem you are trying to solve. Instead of asking "what do you want to design?" Ask "why do you want to design that?" and "what problem and or need will your design ultimately be solving?"


  2. Identify your target population, which group of people will benefit from your project. Is the target population an individual, a group, a specific community, or a larger, identifiable population? Is the target population from a specific location (country, region, town), demographic (age or gender), or other identifying characteristics (health condition or employment)? How is your target population connected?


  3. Identify requirements and constraints. A requirement is a need or a necessity; it's what a particular product or service should do. A constraint is a restriction on the degree of freedom you have in providing a solution to a need or problem. 


  4. Ask what are the disadvantages of the present solution to the problem?


  5. Ask what compromises have been made in the present solution?


  6. Determine if the compromises are necessary?


  7. Determine if the solution can be improved?
    1. By taking a new approach
    2. By making the design more accurate, safer, more convenient, easier to maintain, cheaper, or more attractive

  8. Determine if you can reduce the costs by eliminating parts, using different materials, changing the way the product is manufactured?


In a nutshell

  1. Design Step 1: Identify the Need
  2. Design Step 2: Research the Problem
  3. Design Step 3: Brainstorm Possible Solutions
  4. Design Step 4: Engineering Analysis-select the most promising solution
  5. Design Step 5: Construct a Prototype
  6. Design Step 6: Evaluate/Manufacture a Final Product-Reiterate




Design Provocations

The following list is attributed to Alex Osborn
  • Substiture something
  • Combine it with something else
  • Adapt something to it
  • Modify or magnify it
  • Put it to some other use
  • Eliminate something
  • Reverse or rearrange it



OTHER IDEAS

  • Adornment challenge: design pendants, bracelets or superhero rings.
  • Puzzle Challenge: design a puzzle comprised of 3 interlocking separate objects
  • Mr. Potato Challenge: Design a base and modular pieces to attach to the base
  • Ball and Socket: Create an articulated hand or foot
  • Animation Challenges: Design/Plan a possible stop motion animation that could use printed pieces
  • Animation Challenge: Create a face with pieces for the mouth, eyes and eyebrows that can be moved and synced to sound
  • Design Challenge: Lamp That— turn an object into a lamp.
  • Design Challenge: One a Day—ideating, designing, modeling and making. Pick an object like a coffee cup and see how far you can push it
  • Design Challenge: Create a 3D model from a younger student's drawing
  • Design Challenge: Scan and modify a plush toy
  • Humanities: Create puppets and re-enact a reading or play.
  • CyArk: Spurred by the Taliban's destruction of the 1600-year-old Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, CyArk was founded in 2003 to ensure heritage sites are available to future generations, while making them uniquely accessible today. Visit the website for 3D lesson plans
  • Interdisciplinary: Capture your town, neighborhood, school
  • Interdisciplinary: Urban Futures
  • CyArk is a non-profit organization that is working on creating digital replicas of the world's best known monuments, with the hope of capturing 500 in total. The idea is to map and preserve these monuments. The CyArk website also provides resources for educators.
  • From a drawing to a model (inspired by DesignMakeTeach's SHARPIE TO 3D PRINT IN 30 MINUTES
    1. Draw a small picture on an index card with a Sharpie marker.
    2. Take a photo of the drawing
    3. Upload to your computer
    4. Open in Inkscape
    5. Select Path>Trace Bitmap. Click Update and close the pp-up window
    6. Save file as .svg
    7. Open a new model in Tinkercad
    8. Click Import, select file, scale the file
    9. Download and print
  • DesignMakeTeach's PERSONALIZE A GIMBAL
  • Create your own nets with these hinges or download and print Mathgrrl's (Laura Taalman ) Triangular polyhedra nets 
    The nets are made to have .2mm (one layer) base thickness plus another .2mm (another layer) for the faces themselves, which are inset just a bit from the base layer so that fold lines develop naturally. Thicker nets did not fold very well and tended to snap along the edges. 

    Even better, make your own nets. 
    Look at Origami Heavenfor inspiration.
  • Coin Trap
  • Tinkercad Gyro Maker by Mathgrrl (Laura Taalman) 
    • learn to move, align, and group objects and use that knowledge to put together a customized gyro from pre-made pieces.
    • Choose one small inside hole and use the sliders in the Shape Script to change the number of sides/petals or the amount of twist in the shape. Then Align the small hole with the small blue gyro center and Group them together. For the outside, choose a large shape and customize it to your liking, then Align and Group the large shape with the large hole. Finally, select the customized outer ring together with the orange, yellow, green, and customized blue gyro rings, and Align and Group together to make the final gyro.


The following information has been collected through scanning NYCIST email. People on this list have indicated that they are interested in 3D printing or are actively engaged with it in their classrooms. 
I would like to track who uses what (printers and software) in their classrooms, and if there are lessons people would like to share. 
Send email if you would like to be added or removed from this list or if information can be added. (lizarum@gmail.com)

This is a starting point:

Scott Adamson (Friends Seminary) sadamson@friendsseminary.org
Printers:
Software:

Lizabeth Arum (Saint Ann's) lizarum@gmail.com
Printers:
MakerBot Replicator 2:4
Ditto Pro:4
Ultimaker 2:1
Ultimaker 2 Go:1
Software:
AutoCAD
Fusion360
123D Design
TinkerCAD
SketchUp
Meshmixer
Blender
OpenSCAD

Matthew Bachiochi (The Buckley School) matt@mattbach.com
Printers:
Software:

Rachel Beane (Riverdale Country School) rbeane@riverdale.edu
Printers:
Software:

Nicole Blandford (Nightingale) nblandford@nightingale.org
Printers:
Ultimaker:1
Software:

Karen Blumberg (Columbia) karenblumberg@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Bill Campbell (Dwight-Englewood School) campbb@d-e.org
Printers:
Software:

Cathy Cheo-Isaacs (Trevor Day School) ccheoisaacs@trevor.org
Printers:
Software:

Luigi Cicala (The Brearley School) lcicala@brearley.org
Printers:
Software:
OpenSCAD

Tim Cooper (The York School) timothy.s.cooper@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Raúl Cuza (UNIS) 
Printers:
Software:

Sean Dagony-Clark (Riverdale) sdc@riverdale.edu
Printers:
Software:

Jennifer Davenport (Speyer Legacy School) jdavenport@speyerlegacyschool.org
Printers:
MakerBot:2
FlashForges:2
Software:
TinkerCAD

Jaymes Dec (Marymount) jaymesdec@gmail.com
Printers:
MakerBot Replicator 2:2
MakerBot Replicator 2X:2
MakerBot:8
Software:
TinkerCAD, OpenSCAD

Jed Dioguardi () jed3rd@gmail.com
Printers:
PrintrBot Simple:1
PrintrBot Plus:1
Software:

Vera Donovan (The Stevenson School) vdonovan@stevenson-school.org
Printers:
Software:

Deborah Faber (Riverdale) dfaber@riverdale.edu
Printers:
Software:
SketchUp
123D Design
TinkerCAD

Jacob Farkas (LREI .:. Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School) jfarkas@lrei.org
Printers:
Software:

Steve Farnsworth (The Dwight School) farnsworth.steve@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Chris Fleischl (Dwight-Englewood School) fleisc@d-e.org
Printers:
Software:
TinkerCAD

Liz Gallo (The Churchill School and Center) lgallo@churchillschool.com
Printers:
Software:

David Held () dheld@poughkeepsieday.org
Printers:
Afinia:1
Software:

Lan Heng (Ethical Culture Fieldston School) 
Printers:
Software:

Laura Hollis () laurahollis525@gmail.com>
Printers:
M3D:3
Software:

Pat Hough (International School of Brooklyn) phough@isbrooklyn.org
Printers:
Software:

Jill Kaplan (Village Community School) jkaplan@vcsnyc.org
Printers:
Software:

Young Kim (Hewitt) 
Printers:
Software:

Matthew LeWinter (Stephen Gaynor School) mlewinter@stephengaynor.org
Printers:
Software:

Jay Levine (Staten Island Academy) mrlevineteacher@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Brenda MacDonald (Red Deer Catholic Regional Schools ) brenda.macdonald@rdcrs.ca
Printers:
Software:

Jay McKay (Ethical Culture Fieldston School) jmckay@ecfs.org
Printers:
Software:

Timothy McKeon () tmckeon@churchillschool.com
Printers:
MakerBot Replicator 2:1
MakerBot Gen 5:1
MakerBot Gen 5 Mini:1
Form 1+:1
Software:

Vanessa Miller (Rodeph Sholom School) vv.miller@gmail.com
Printers:
MakerBot Replicator:2
Software:
TinkerCAD

Grant Olds (The Town School) gkolds@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Rebecca Penina Simon (Solomon Schechter School of Queens) rsimon@sssq.org
Printers:
Software:

Diana Potts (Ethical Culture) dpotts@ecfs.org
Printers:
Software:

Jeremy Sambuca (Hewitt School) jsambuca@hewittschool.org
Printers:
New Matter MOD-t:1
MakerBot Replicator 2:2
MakerBot Gen 5 Mini:2
Software:
TinkerCAD
SketchUp

Colin Anton Samuel (Greenvale School) csamuel@greenvaleschool.org
Printers:
Software:

Steve Schecter (Trevor Day School) sschechter@trevor.org
Printers:
Software:

Clair Segal (LREI- Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School) csegal@lrei.org
Printers:
Software:

Judith Seidel (Friends Seminary) jseidel@friendsseminary.org
Printers:
Software:

Christina Shailas (Convent of the Sacred Heart) cshailas@cshnyc.org
Printers:
Software:

Michelle Sherry (School of the Holy Child) m.sherry@holychildrye.org
Printers:
Software:

Ross Stafford (Robert Louis Stevenson School) rstafford@stevenson-school.org
Printers:
Software:

Alex Steinberg (Churchill School and Center) asteinberg@churchillschool.com
Printers:
MakerBot Replicator 2:1
MakerBot Gen 5:1
Software:

Tony Tepedino () ttepedino@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Anthony Tricarico (Saint Saviour) tricarico.anthony@gmail.com
Printers:
Software:

Quoc Vo (Francis Parker) qvo@francisparker.org
Printers:
PrintrBot Simple:
Cubify Ekocycle:1
Software:


Sources:
Ċ
Kristjan Järvan,
Aug 10, 2017, 2:35 AM
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