Glencullen
 

 

Glencullen

         Glencullen is a townland in the civil parish of Kiltiernan, in the barony and Poor Law Union of Rathdown, in the county of Dublin, province of Leinster. It is in the Roman Catholic parish of Sandyford in the Barony of Rathdown in County Dun Laoghaire–Rathdown. Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown is located to the south-east of the City of Dublin, and has its administrative centre in the town of Dún Laoghaire. In 1994, the area of the Corporation of Dún Laoghaire, the Deansgrange Joint Burial Board and the south-east part of County Dublin were merged to create the county of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown.

 
Research Dublin City Library

The Knights Hospitallers

 

Sources:

- Dublin Parishes Author: Donnelly

Short Histories of Dublin parishes

Part IX Parishes of St. James and St. Catherine

 

 The Knights Hospitallers

 

Original owners of the Priory of Kilmainham were the Knights Templars rather than the Knights of St. John.

Papers by Mr. Litton Falkiner and Mr. Herbert Wood, Published in the Royal Irish Academy Proceedings, vol. XXVI, correct this mistake and determine as owners of the Priory of Kilmainham the Knights Hospitallers.

 The Order of The Knights  hospitallers was formed by Italian merchants to take care of the sick of Jerusalem. The later started protecting pilgrims as well.

This order became known as the Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, or just simply the Knights Hospitallers.

 

During Strongbow's conquest of Ireland on behalf of Dermot Mc Murrough he used a good number of these monastic warriors returning from the Crusades in his invading army.

Strongbow endowed the order with Kilmainham, later confirmed by Henry II in 1172.

Their possessions included the whole of Kilmainham down to the river.

At the same time, Hugh Tyrell (Strongbow's comrade in arms) was offended by Hugh de Lacy of Castleknock, which included the lands of Kilnamanagh.

 

Kilnamanagh was also important because of the fact that it was here, and not in Kilmashogue, that Niall Glundun, nicknamed the Black Knee, on September 15th 919, whilst marching on Dublin was defeated and mortally wounded by the Danes.

The ford of Kilmashogue can be found back in the Corporation records describing the riding of the Franchises.

The Knights Hospitallers were granted in a short space of time with lands and churches in eight counties of Ireland, next to their possessions in Dublin.

In Dublin the order owned a mill on the Liffey, the rectories of Kilmainham, Chapelizod, Ballyfermot and Palmerstown. All this wealth contributed to the fact that they received all the possessions of The Knights Templars in Ireland in 1308. This brought in to their jurisdiction the wealthy commandery of Clontarf.

Pope Eugenius III remitted portions of Church fines to those who gave money or entered the brotherhood in 1146.

Pope Adrian IV exempted them from tenths.

Pope Alexander III, in 1173, gave them the extraordinary right of enrolling priests as chaplain, exempted from Episcopal Authority, but subject immediately to the Prior of Kilmainham.

The Kilmainham Priory accommodated about 30 knights, with their esquires and companions.

The Dublin mountains, where the powerful O' Byrne and O' Toole clans reigned were frequently the scene of their contests. The Priory of Kilmainham sat as a Baron in Parliament.

Until the 15th Century the order was a very English affair and it wasn't until that century that we find the first Anglo-Irish names amongst the Priors. Most notably: Butler, Fitzgerald, and Talbot.

Sir John Rawson, the last Prior, surrendered their possessions to King Henry VIII in 1541.

By the time Queen Mary ascended the Throne most properties of religious communities suppressed by Henry VIII had fallen into lay hands but the Priory Lands of Kilmainham still belonged to the Crown. Queen Mary re-established the Priory o the Knights and appointed Sir Oswald Messingberd as Prior.

This ended when Elizabeth ascended the Throne and  Sir Oswald Messingberd left the island.

The buildings continued to be in use as the residence of the Viceroy for a short period, but eventually fell into ruin.

At the time of the erection of the Royal Hospital in 1680 the walls of the Priory Church were the only remains above ground. Nowadays the only visible surviving relic is the Priory Church window to be found in the Chapel.

 


Parishes of Sandyford and Glencullen, Killiney, Bray and Cabinteely

 

Sources:

- Dublin Parishes Author: Donnelly

Short Histories of Dublin parishes

Part V Parishes of Sandyford and Glencullen, Killiney, Bray and Cabinteely

- Wakeman, Vol. XXI, R.S.A.I. Journal, p.699

 

Let us begin with the Parish of Dundrum to Bray River.

From 1615 until 1829 one Catholic Parish existed in this area.

Its stretched from the boundaries of Blackrock, Kingstown, Monkstown and Glasthule Parishes to the Three Rock Mountain. All this formed one Catholic Parish.

It now comprises 3 Catholic Parishes, namely:

      The Parish of Sandyford and Glencullen

      The Parish of Killiney and Cabinteeley

      The Parish of Little Bray (united to Bray Parish in 1894)

 

 

The whole area is full of history. It has pre-historic remains and traditions, numerous ruins of old Celtic churches and stirring records of prolonged struggles between Clansmen and Palesmen.

During medieval times parochial denominations were numerous and some still survive in civil and legal documents connected with the transfer of lands and in the returns of the decennial census.

There were seven Catholic Parishes in total:

      Kilgobbin

      Kilternan

      Rathmicheal

      Old Connaught

      Killiney

      Tully

      Kill

 

 

The area also harvests a lot of well preserved Cromleachs and numerous other monuments in a.o. Shanganagh, Brennanstown, Kilternan, Glencullen and Carriggollogan.

 

 

Glencullen was at that time in the Parish of Kilternan.

 

Kilternan, or Kiltiernan, was named after Cill Tiernan, the Church of Tiernan.

Who this particular St. Tiernan (or St. Ternan) was is not known, since several saints of the same name are mentioned in Irish Martyrologies. St. Tiernan probably lived in the 6th, or early 7th, century as the older parts of the church are from this period.

This Cill or Teampull is in form a plain quadrangle, measuring externally 48 ft. by 24 (16 by 8 mtrs.). It still retains three of its main features:

      an original square-headed doorway in the west gable

      a pointed doorway in the south side wall

      a round-headed light to the east

 

It is similar in design to the churches we see at Glendalough. It is clear that the whole structure, with exception of the eastern gable and part of the adjoining side walls, is of a very early date.

(See Wakeman, Vol. XXI, R.S.A.I. Journal, p.699)

The doorway remains intact although blocked by medieval masonry.

The southside has a doorway of a very different style. It is pointed, clearly of  13th Century origin, and designed to replace the square-headed western doorway.

The eastern window is undoubtedly of the same period. Openings of a very similar character can be found at the nearby 13th century castles of Bullock and Dalkey.

Within the ruin you'll find a round, hollowed and perforated stone, supposedly a baptismal font, and  the Holy well of St. Tiernan, almost smothered by weeds and brambles.

Kilternan, including Glencullen, was transferred (both the lands as the spiritualities) to one of the Anglo-Norman invaders, William de Carew, who shortly afterwards donated it to the Monks of St. Mary's Abbey.. They named their Chaplain to administer the parish.

 

During the 13th century the Anglo-Norman invaders were allowed to enjoy their possessions in peace, and Archbishop Luke (1228-1255) passed most of his time in his manor at Shankill, as did one of his successors, John de Saundford (1284-1284).

The clans of the O' Byrnes and the O' Tooles had taken refuge in the inhospitable glens of the Wicklow Mountains after being driven from their lands in Kildare in the early part of the 13th century.

Around the year 1290 they started an armed campaign against their astonished neighbours in South Dublin which lasted for 600 years, devastating the district.

It wasn't until 1327, when Edward Bruce invaded the country, that the fortified frontier of the Pale came into existence..

The line of castles of the Pale, commencing with Rathfarnham and Roebuck and continuing through Dundrum, Kilgobbin, Kiltiernan, Shankill, Fassaroe, Rathdown, Kindelstown and Newcastle, marked the furthermost line beyond it was not safe for the Anglo-Normans.

Glencullen is just beyond this line in the mountains and therefore destined to be O' Byrnes and O' Tooles country. King Richard II the second was particularly ruthless in his attempts to conquer the mountains. So far were hostilities carried that even the Archbishop could not venture south beyond Newcastle, and the Holy See felt called upon to revive, at least temporarily, the old See of Glendalough, so that the faithful living under the independent sway of the O' Byrnes and the O' Tooles might not be deprived of Episcopal guardianship.

Being on the border of the Pale, Glencullen fell under this See of Glendalough.

The O' Byrne and O' Toole clans of Henry VIII reign surrendered to him and peace was restored in the 16th century. This peace was not breached until Elizabeth's reign, when Feagh mac Hugh started a new campaign.

After the Kilkenny Synod of 1615 the Irish church changed and the time of endowments and benefices came to an end.

Kilternan passed in 1571 to the hands of the Fitzwilliams of Merrion, but before the end of the 17th century they parted with it. Glencullen went into the hands of Mr. Thomas Fitzsimon, Kilternan went to the Johnson family.

 


The new Parish of Sandyford and Glencullen.

 

 In 1818 Father Patrick Smyth, a native of the diocese of Meath, was appointed Curate to Loughlinstown. In 1822 he was transferred to Maynooth, and Father Bartholomew Sheridan, taken from Maynooth, together with Father James M'Kenna, were appointed joint Curates to Loughlinstown. This arrangement continued until Father Flood, of Sandyford, died in1824 and Father Patrick Smyth was brought back from Maynooth and established as resident Curate in Sandyford. On March 20th, 1829, Canon Doyle was called to this ambt,after 48 years of service as Parish Priest. The rapid growth of Kingstown and its neighbourhood gave rise to the feeling that it was high time to give canonical status to the remote quasi-independent juirsidiction of Sandyford and Glencullen. Archbishop Murray, erected Sandyford and Glencullen into a separate Parish, with its resident Curate as its first Parish Priest.

This new Parish was made up of the old Pre-Reformation Parishes of Kilternan and Kilgobbin, together with certain parcels taken from the adjoining Parishes of Taney, Kill and Tully.

Dr. Murray's letter was dated April 6th, 1829, appointing Father Patrick Smyth Parish Priest.

In this letter he told the new Parish Priest to confer with Father Bartholomew Sheridan, whom was just appointed Parish Priest of Kingstown as to definitely and clearly fix the Parish's boundaries.

 

The following is a transcript from the official document made up at that Conference:

 

We, the undersigned, have finally agreed that the following townlands shall in future be the boundaries of the Parishes of Cabinteely and Sandyford, viz.: Ballyogan, Jamestown, Biddy Field, Glanamuck, Kingstown, Ballycorus, Barnaslingen, and the west side of the old road to the country brook. All the above lands are, by mutual agreement, to be hereafter attached to the Parish of Sandyford.

 

“Date, this day, 13 April, 1829.

 

“Bartholomew Sheridan, P.P., Cabinteely”

“P. Smyth, P.P., Sandyford.””

 

All through the 18th century, and perhaps even father back, Sandyford, but without this name, had enjoyed all the privileges of an independent Parish. It came therefore as no so surprise that it would finally become an official independent Parish in 1829.

In the register of 1704 it is mentioned that Father Patrick White was residing at Kilternan.

The Returns of 1731 register a priest at Kilgobbin, without giving his name.

From 1731 until 1761 no information can be found about Kilternan or Sandyford.

An old Baptismal and Marriage Register still exists, commenced in 1761, and from the identity of the handwriting down to 1782, we can establish that the clergyman of the earlier date was the same as the clergyman in charge mentioned in Dr. Carpenter's List of 1771, namely, Reverent James Mulvey. After Father Mulvey's hard and solitary life in the lonely mountains he met with a tragic, and even harder, termination of his religious career.

In Exshaw's Magazine for May 14th, 1779, we can read:

 

Some villains broke into the room of Rev. Mr. Mulvey, a Romish clergyman of Sandyford, near Kilgobbin, and plundered it of many articles of value. That gentleman calling on one of them by name in hope that he would make them desist, the villain gave him two separate cuts on the neck with a large knife, but happily missed the windpipe ; he, however, lies dangerously ill.”

 

The handwriting in the register, Mr. Mulvey's, continues until the summer of 1782, when we see a new handwriting appear, evidently denoting that the reverend gentleman had succumbed to the effects of the desperate attack.

 

The Reverent    Father Whelan,a  capuchin from Churchstreet Chapel, took ober Sandyford Parish until a secular priest came available.

In the list of those that took the test oath in 783, he is registered as Rev. Laurence Sylvester Whelan, though in the Sandyford register of Baptisms he figures twice as Rev. Joseph Whelan.

In 1780 a Rev. William Flood , native of Kildare diocese, was ordained by Dr. Carpenter for the diocese of Dublin, and sent to the College at Antwerp in Belgium to pursue his studies. Thence he returned in 1784 , and soon after was placed in charge of Sandyford and Glencullen.

He commenced the erection of the present Chapel of Sandyford.

William Flood died in 1824.

His successor placed a nice tablet in the wall of the chapel with the following inscription:

 

“ Reverendus Gulielmus Flood, Arcidioecesis Dubliniensis Presbyter. Hujusce Paroeicae Vice-Pastor. Necnon hujusce Ecclesie fundator. Obiit anno aetatis sucae septuagesimo, 17a die Aprilis, A.D. MDCCCXXIV. Reliquiis suis haec Ecclesia gaudet. R.I.P. Amen.”

 

This translates into:

 

“Reverent William Flood, Priest of the Archdiocese of Dublin and Founder of this church, died in the 70th year of his age, on the 17th of April, 1824. This church rejoices in the possession of his remains. R.I.P. Amen”

 


Reverent Patrick Smyth, Parish Priest 1829-1860

 

In 1853, Father Smyth compiled an inventory of all the Church property., and prefaced it by a short, but very interesting, historical retrospect. From it, and from the Visitation Schedules of 1834 and 1837 we know the following particulars.

When Father Smyth came to the parish in 1823, he found two thatched Chapels.

One Chapel, at Sandyford, was ready to yield at every blast of wind. The walls of the church were partly built, lied exposed for sixteen years, unfinished, without a roof.

He found another Chapel, also a barn, at Newtown on the mountain side and the estate of Sir Compton Domville.

There was no schoolhouse in the Parish.

In those days schools was held in the Chapels.

No suitable vestments or decent chalice were to be found in the Parish.

He commenced fter a while to finish the Church at Sandyford, and also tof ound and build another, about three miles form Sandyford, about 1,000 feet above sea-level, on a new site,and on the estate of Christopher Fitzsimon, Esquire.

After many years of toiling and collecting, Sandyford was at length brought to its present condition by many public contributions, and a generous gift by B.E. Lawless, who roofed the church at his own expense.

The Church of Glencullen was, thanks to generous efforts of T. O' Mara Esq. , and Christopher Fitzsimon, Esq., and also many public contributions, made respectable and tolerably finished.

The Church at Sandyford was opened in 1830, and dedicated to Our Blessed Lady under the title of her Assumption. The ground on which the church stands is held without any kind of lease, but on the title of undisturbed possession.

It was a gift to the Parish by a certain Mt. Swift, the original possessor.

In the answers of the queries of the commission, inquiring into the condition of the poor, Father Smyth states that “there are but three two-story houses in the Parish, one of which is the Parochial house, which will cost £300 when completely finished.”

 

Father Smyth mentions a cotton factory at Kilternan, and a paper factory near it, and o the smelting house at Ballycorus.

When Father Smyth first came to the Parish he rented a cottage at Murphystown until the Parochial house became available , in August, 1832.

Then came his first curate, Rev. T.A. Murphy. A second Curate was added in 1845.

In 1845 Father Smyth made a pilgrimage to Rome, and the priest that was left in charge, took up his residence at Glencullen, in a house adjoining the Church.

This house was paid for by money collected in Ireland and England by Brother Macarius ( a Trappist), on ground given to the church by Mr. Fitzsimon.

The schoolhouse in Sandyford was built in 1840.

It cost £ 500, provided by Lord Castlecoote.

Form the same source schools were provided at Glencullen. In 1840, Father Smyth added a tower, spire and vestry to Sandyford, and in 1853 he took a census of his flock, showing 2,554 Catholics.

The official census of 1901 showed 1,423 Catholics Father Smyth died on May 28th 1860.

He was buried at Glencullen at the end of the churchyard farthest from the road.

His grave is surrounded by an iron railing, and an inscription on the stone reads:

 

Erected to the memory of Patrick Smyth, Parish Priest of Sandyford and Glencullen, who was ordained  in 1815, came to this Parish in 1823, and died, to the regret of his bloved flock, on May 28th, 1860.

Requiescat in pace.”

 

Father Smyth was succeeded by Reverent Charles O' Connell, Parish Priest , 1860-1872

 

Reverent Charles O' Connell, Parish Priest , 1860-1872

 

Father O' Connell was ordained in Maynooth, in 1832, and soon after appointed Curate in St. Michan's , Dublin, where he continued until Parish Priest, Balbriggan, in 1851.

When he came to Sandyford, he found everything done that required to be done in the circumstances, and beyond building a curate's house on the other side of Sandyford Chapel, his adminisration was almost uneventful. He did make a collection for building a school at Stepaside or Golden Ball, for which purpose Father Smyth had left a small sum in his will. He collected between £300 and £400 but the school never became a reality, and the money being invested , the interest accruing is expended on the existing schools of the Parish. The Fenian rising of 1867, which culminated in “The Battle of Tallaght” , presented in this region an increased military presence.

A band of Fenians, fairly well armed, starting form Milltown, attacked the police barracks at Dundrum and Stepaside, made some of the Constabulary temporary prisoners, and forcibly commandeered Father James Walsh, of Glencullen, to act as chaplain to the forces. Father James Walsh excepted but 24 hours later the campaign was terminated and they all came to their senses.

The 2nd Curate to Father Smyth, in 1845, was Father P. Doyle, and Father T.A. Murphy was replaced by Father Charles O' Connor.

Charles O' Connor was of the O'Connor's in Kerry ,and nephew of “the Liberator”. He died in 1861.

After a short interval he was succeeded by Father Daniel Lyne, who was in turn succeeded in 1870 by Father Duff. Father James Walsh was appointed in 1853, and remained resident in Glencullen until 1881, when he was promoted Parish Priest to Skerries.

Fathers P. Warren, T. Boland, T. Keogh, E. Cullen, P. Connelly and R. Bowden were successively Curates for short terms in the Parish.

In 1893 Father Maguire came to Glencullen, to be succeeded by Father Seaver in 1901, and by Rev. M. Behan in 1905.

In 1895 the Rev. Philip Ryan, the resident Curate in Sandyford came to the Parish.

In 1872 Father O' Connell passed away, leaving as Curates Father Walsh and Father Duff and being succeeded by Rev. James (Canon) Leahy.

 


Very Rev. James (Canon) Leahy, Parish Priest, 1872-1905

 

Father O' Connell was buried in the chapel, and a slab over his head bears this inscription:

 

“Of  your charity, pray for the repose of the soul of Rev. Charles O' Connell, P.P., Sandyford and Glencullen, whose remains rest beneath this slab. He departed this life on 27th November, 1872, aged 64 years. R.I.P. Amen”

 

His successor, Father Leahy, was a native of Dublin, and of St. Andrew's Parish. On his coming to Sandyford he was pleased to identify the carved oak railing that encloses the altar as the same at which he had made his first Communion in old Townsend-street Chapel.

He was ordained in Maynooth in 1848, and after a short time in Chapelizod was named Curate in St. Nicholas's,  Francis-street, in 1850, and in 1860 transferred to a Curacy in Kingstown.

In 1880 he was admitted into the Chapter. During his long administration in Sandyford and Glencullen of 32 years, the schools and the newly-formed Sodalities of the Sacred Heart for Men and Women became his special care, but for the last 10 years of his life he was a permanent invalid, and only appeared in public occasionally.

He died in November 1905 and was buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.

His successor was Rev. John Kelly.

 


Rev. John Kelly, Parish Priest, 1905

 

For 30 years Father Kelly had served as Curate to Glasthule and Dalkey, mostly in the latter.

As short as his time in Sandyford was, he managed to leave a permanent impression on the parochial structures. He expended in 1905 £200, subscribed by the Parishioners, on painting, seating, and providing new confessionals at Sandyford. The rebuilding of the parochial house and improvement in the garden and grounds cost over £600; and the new Church at Glencullen, of which the foundation stone was laid by His Grace the Archbishop of Dublin on Sunday, July 5th, 198, is already several feet over ground. The contractor is bound to have it completed before August, 1909. The contract is for £1,915.A local fete, organised by Father Seaver in 1903, to fund this raised £430. A bazaar given in Mr. Richard Croker’s beautiful grounds at Glencairn brought in £790. This means that in total about £1420 was raised, which meant £1300 after bank interest. At the public meeting, held on the occasion of laying the foundation stone, the Archbishop donated the remainder of the contract money. A collection was then made for furniture and equipments, to which Mr. R. Croker contributed £100 and Mr. J. Talbot Power £50.Other sums quickly came in, realising a total of nearly £300


Glencullen Valley

 

The highest point of Two Rock Mountain, 1,763 feet (581 metres) above seal level, is crowned by a great cairn of stones called Fairy Castle., 30 yards (27.4 metres) in diameter and about 10 feet (3 ½ metres) high. No enclosing kerbstone can be seen and there is no evidence this cairn has ever been opened.  We assume that it contains a chamber built of large stones similar to the one on Seefin Mountain. On the lower slope of the Two Rock Mountain formerly known as Slieve Gearr, there is an oval enclosure 64 yards (58.5 metres) long and containing in the centre the foundations of a small square building. Against the inside of the enclosing bank are remains of two more structures.

Around 1900 this area was noted for its barren aspect and the extreme poverty of its inhabitants. There was no road or lane of any description between here and Glencullen village and no workable land except for a few little patches between the barren rock which scarcely repaid the worker of the land for the immense trouble of cultivating it. The main occupation here was the manufacture of brooms or besoms from the heath growing on the mountain. Conditions have changed much now. The road built by Mr. Chris Fitzsimon, Esq. is now used by tourists and all the new houses and well cultivated plots are evidence of an industrious community.

Remarkable are the fields on both sides of the Glencullen River which are divided into very small plots and strips by fences and low baulks. This can be seen as a remnant of the ancient and uneconomic system called rundale, which was the result of repeatingly subdivisioning of original holdings. This was probably the only place in Leinster where these conditions still existed.

On the far slope we see the small village of Boranaraltry. It can be reached by going down a very steep byroad descending down to the river to cross the bridge. This road continues on at the other side of the river up Glencullen Mountain to serve the old granite quarries which are a conspicuous landmark on the far side of the valley.

These quarries once supported many families in the valley and are almost deserted, and above and under it nature is taking over again. West of the quarries is a small passage to give access to higher parts of the mountain for turf cutting and other purposes.

 In one of the fields below the quarry we can find a small ringfort.

In 1836 when O’Curry was collecting place names in connection with the Ordnance Survey he recorded a place called Baile an Araldaigh (Harold’s Town) in Glencullen. This is probably identical with Boranaraltry and would indicate that this place was associated with the family of Harold who held large areas in County Dublin down to the 17th century.

 

The village of Brockey is next. On the south side of this village was once a fine ringfort known locally as Old Glencullen House, but no remains can be found nowadays.

The same fate befell a megalithic tomb, situated on a little summit just past Brockey village. It was known as Leaba na Saigh (the Hound’s Bed) and was covered with a large stone ten feet long and eight feet wide. A drawing of this ancient monument was made and published by the Royal Society of Antiquaries in 1855, some years before it completely faded away. It is now regarded as a natural rock formation.

After Brockey village a laneway right leads to Glencullen River and was part of an old road leading to Boranaraltry. In a field beside this land was a holy well known as the Butter Well. It was visited by those suffering from stomach disorders. In former times dairy vessels were washed with its waters as a precaution against the loss of butter by witchcraft, which no doubt accounts for the title of the well. Another well known as Fanny’s Well, used only for domestic purposes, is at the side of the lane, outside the field.

 

The lands of Glencullen were at one time the property of the Abbey of St. Mary the Virgin.

After the Reformation they were held by the Fitzwilliams of Merrion who sold them about the end of the 17th century to Mr. Thos. Fitzsimons whose descendants continued to reside there down to recent years. Glencullen House is situated in a picturesque setting on the south of the village near the Glencullen River and the old Granite quarry. Here resided during the 20th century Cristopher Fitzsimons D.L. who was clerk of the Crown and Hanaper and a Member of Parliament. He was married to a daughter of Daniel O’Connell.

Beside the entrance to Glencullen House on the site later occupied by the dispensary was the constabulary barracks which was attacked and captured by the Fenians on March 6th 1867.

The party, under Captain Patrick Lennon, had assembled at Rathgar the night before and marched through Dundrum and Stepaside where they had successfully captured the barracks. On approaching Glencullen, rifle men were deployed to surround the barracks. The police were called upon to surrender and refused, whereupon an exchange of rifle fire commenced, which did little damage on either side.  When a party got onto the roof and opened up a hole in preparation for an attack from above the inmates surrendered.

Enriched by the arms and ammunition from the barracks, the Fenians then marched over Glencullen Mountain taking the prisoners with them.

Captain Lennon, on seeing one his men urge on a straggler with the butt of his rifle, drew his revolver and threatened to kill the first person he found insulting or abusing a prisoner.



 

Name of Townlands and occupiers

Name of immediate Lessors

Description of Tenement

Content of land

 

 

Net Annual Value of Land

 

 

Net Annual Value of Buildings

 

 

Total Net Annual Value

 

 

Glencullen

 

 

A

R

P

£

s

d

£

s

d

£

S

d

George Dunne

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices and land

7

2

23

6

0

0

3

10

0

9

10

0

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

In Fee

House, Offices and land

236

3

36

225

0

0

65

0

0

290

0

0

Michael Dillon

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Gate-lodge

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

10

0

1

10

0

Lewis M’Donnell

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House and yard

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

10

0

2

10

0

Constabulary

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Police barrack and yard

 

-

-

-

-

-

5

0

0

5

0

0

John Farrell

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House and Garden

0

0

29

0

10

0

1

10

0

2

0

0

Timothy O’Driscoll

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

3

0

34

3

0

0

-

-

-

3

0

0

Rev. Charles O’Connor

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Office and Land

1

3

12

2

0

0

8

10

0

10

10

0

Roman Catholic Chapel

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

R.C. chapel and graveyard

0

2

34

0

15

0

25

0

0

25

15

0

John Dunne

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices and land

3

0

13

3

5

0

1

10

0

4

15

0

National School

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

National  school-house and land

1

3

28

2

5

0

14

15

0

17

0

0

Mary Doyle

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

3

3

11

4

5

0

8

15

0

17

0

0

James Mc Manus

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

21

1

17

22

0

0

3

0

0

25

0

0

Margaret Cullen

James Mc Manus

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

0

10

0

0

10

0

Esward Campbell

James Mc Manus

House and garden

0

0

17

0

5

0

0

15

0

1

0

0

Thomas Conlan

James Mc Manus

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Peter Neill

James Mc Manus

House, offices and land

1

3

18

2

4

0

1

12

0

3

16

0

Patrick Neill

James Mc Manus

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Patrick Walsh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

6

0

34

8

0

0

3

0

0

11

0

0

Timothy Conlan

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

5

1

0

7

10

0

3

0

0

10

10

0

Patrick Mc Manus

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

34

0

4

28

0

0

5

10

0

33

10

0

William Doyle

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House  and land

3

3

2

5

0

0

3

0

0

8

0

0

Edward Fitzacary

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices and land

13

1

23

16

10

0

3

10

0

20

0

0

Andrew Fitzacary

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Houe, offices and land

13

-

23

16

10

0

1

10

0

18

0

0

Patrick Kelly

Edwars Fitzacary

House and offices

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

0

1

6

0

John Neill

Edward Fitzacary

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

0

1

6

0

Thomas Ellis

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House and garden

0

2

4

0

15

0

1

0

0

1

15

0

Thomas Scully

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House and land

26

2

13

26

0

0

2

10

0

29

10

0

Cornelius Byrne

Thomas Scully

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Patrick Kavanagh

Margaret Kavanagh

Garden

0

1

30

0

8

0

-

-

-

0

8

0

Margaret Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

5

1

31

5

10

0

-

-

-

6

10

0

Timothy Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

10

0

39

12

0

0

-

-

-

12

0

0

Philip Maguire

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

6

2

1

3

0

0

4

0

0

13

0

0

Denis Maguire

Philip Maguire

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Timothy Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

1

1

31

1

0

0

-

-

-

1

0

0

Margaret Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

1

1

30

1

0

0

-

-

-

1

0

0

John Connor

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

7

0

10

8

10

0

1

10

0

10

0

0

Mrs. Neill

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

7

0

10

8

10

0

0

16

0

9

6

0

John Merrin

John Connor

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Mary Doyle

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Offices and land

34

1

17

38

10

0

0

15

0

39

6

0

Edward Byrne

Mary Doyle

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0

0

1

0

0

Patrick Grumley

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices and land

36

3

27

41

10

0

3

10

0

46

0

0

Simeon Grumley

Patrick Grumley

House

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

0

1

2

0

James Fitzacary

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices and land

16

2

15

16

10

0

2

10

0

12

0

0

John Murphy

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, offices, land

8

1

7

8

2

0

1

0

0

9

2

0

James Grumley

Patrick Grumley

House and garden

1

2

3

2

0

0

1

6

0

3

6

0

 

 

TOTAL

523

1

1

533

4

0

191

8

0

724

12

0

 

 

Exemptions: Police barrack and yard

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

0

0

5

0

0

 

 

 

R.C. Chapel and graveyard

0

2

34

0

15

0

25

0

0

25

15

0

 

 

National School, house & Land

1

3

2

2

5

0

14

15

0

17

0

0

 

 

TOTAL OF EXEMPTIONS

2

2

22

3

0

0

44

15

0

47

15

0

 

 

TOTAL, EXCLUSIVE OF EXEMPTIONS

520

2

19

530

4

0

146

13

0

676

17

0

Glencullen Mountain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Fitzacary

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

16

3

18

5

10

0

-

-

-

5

10

0

Mary Kelly

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

16

3

17

5

10

0

-

-

-

5

10

0

Thomas Scully

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

34

0

39

11

0

0

-

-

-

11

0

0

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

In Fee

Land

429

1

6

45

0

0

-

-

-

45

0

0

Daniel Murphy

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Care-taker’s lodge

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

10

0

1

10

0

Timothy Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and land

46

2

16

22

0

0

1

16

0

23

16

0

Margaret Kavanagh

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

House, office and Land

46

2

15

22

0

0

1

5

0

23

5

0

Patrick Kavanagh

Timothy Kavanagh

House nd garden

1

3

10

1

0

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

Mary Doyle

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

32

0

37

14

0

0

-

-

-

14

0

0

John Connor

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

7

1

3

1

12

0

-

-

-

1

12

0

Widow Neill

Chris Fitzsimon, Esq.

Land

7

1

2

1

12

0

-

-

-

1

12

0

 

 

TOTAL

639

0

3

129

4

0

5

11

0

134

15

0

 


Standing Stone

         Standing Stone

         Glencullen has an important standing stone. It's located near Johnny Fox's Pub.

         http://www.glencullengolfclub.ie/

          

         This beautiful quartz upright measures about 1.5m high and is square in section. Glistening white it now sits close to a tee on a small par 3 golf course. It can clearly be seen from the road. Even over the wall this stone gives out tremendous energy.
Grid Reference: O 191 203
GPS Reference: O 19120 20275 (7m)
OS Sheet: 50
Longitude: 6°13‘0.11“W
Latitude: 53°13‘11.2“N
Nearest Town: Bray (7.3km)

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                           


 

Johnnie Fox’s Pub

         Johnny Fox's Pub (also spelled as Johnnie Fox's Pub) was established in 1798, the year of the Irish Rebellion led by Theobald Wolfe Tone, which makes it one of the oldest pubs in Ireland. It claims to be the highest pub in Ireland and there's no proof it isn't. It was used by the 1916 Rebellion-leaders as a meeting place. It is renowned for its nice atmosphere, its great seafood dishes and live traditional music.

 

 


Glencullen Golf Course

Glencullen has a nine-hole golf course.

Glencullen Golf Club
Holes 9

Length 4705 m

Par 69
What is a townland?

         A townland is the lowest-level geographical unit of land used in Ireland, smaller than a Parish or County. Townlands vary in size from as small as half an acre (2,000 m²) (Old Church Yard, near Carrickmore, County Tyrone) up to more than seven thousand acres (28 km²) (Sheskin, in north-west County Mayo). Townland size was often determined by the fertility of the land, thus townlands in high quality land tended to be smaller, while townlands in mountainous or bog areas tended to be much larger in size. During the middle decades of the 19th century, an extensive series of maps of Ireland were created by the Ordnance Survey of Ireland for taxation purposes, which documented and standardized the boundaries of the more than 60,000 townlands in Ireland. Townlands form the building blocks for higher-level administrative units such as parishes and District Electoral Divisions (in the Republic of Ireland) or wards (in Northern Ireland). Historically, the townland name was used as the most important division in the Irish postal system; however this role has now been replaced in urban areas and in most areas of Northern Ireland by road names.

         A useful source of information on townlands (with an emphasis on the north) is the Federation for Ulster Local Studies. Its publications include Every Stony Acre Has a Name: Celebration of the Townland in Ulster by Tony Canavan, and Townlands in Ulster: Local History Studies, edited by W.H. Crawford & R.H. Foy.

         A townland system of land division has been used also in Scotland, where boundaries were generally disregarded and lost during 19th century agricultural improvements. In Scotland townlands were called also farmlands and many names remain identifiable in farmstead names ending in Mains. Townland is derived from Old English tún 'manor' or (modern English 'town').


What is a Parish?

         A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. It is used by some Christian churches, and also by the civil government in a number of countries.

 

         Ecclesiastical parishes

         A parish is a subdivision of a diocese or bishopric within the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Church of Sweden, and of some other churches. In Roman Catholicism, each parish has the services of a parish priest, who acts as the chaplain to the area. In some countries, a parish priest may have a fellow priest, called a curate, working along with him. Each parish usually has a central church or chapel, called the parish church, where religious services take place. Some larger parishes may have a number of such churches or chapels.

         With the decline in the numbers of people seeking ordination, in some countries many parishes are now being merged together or are all sharing the services of one priest in a phenomenon known in the United States as clustering. In some countries, parishes are now merely the equivalent of states in the USA, provinces in Canada, or counties in England.

 

         Parishes in civil administration

         In some countries a parish (sometimes called a "civil parish") is an administrative area of civil government. Parishes of this type are found in England, Ireland, the Channel Islands, the U.S. state of Louisiana (where it is equivalent to a county), Estonia and a number of island nations in the region of the Caribbean.

         Civil parishes in England form the lowest level of local government. Each parish has an elected parish council (in some cases known as the town council).


What is a county?

         Originally, in continental Europe, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count. Counts are called "earls" in post-Celtic Great Britain and Ireland - the term is from Old Norse jarl and was introduced by the Vikings - but there is no correlation between "county" and "earldom." Rather, the term "county," from French comté, was simply used by the Normans after 1066 to replace the native English term scir ("sheer") or "shire," in Modern English. A shire was an administrative division of an Anglo-Saxon kingdom (Wessex, Mercia, East Anglia, etc.), usually named after its administrative centre (e.g., Gloucester > Gloucestershire, Worcester > Worcestershire, etc.).

         Thus, whereas the word comté denoted a sovereign jurisdiction in the original French, the English word "county" denotes a subdivision of a sovereign jurisdiction.


What is a Province?

         The island of Ireland is divided into 32 counties, of which 26 later formed the Republic of Ireland and 6 made up Northern Ireland (for current status on Northern Irish counties, see under 'United Kingdom,' below). The counties are traditionally grouped into 4 provinces - Leinster (12), Munster (6) Connacht (5) and Ulster (9). Historically, the counties of Meath, West Meath and Dublin constituted the province of Meath - one of the "Five Fifths" of Ireland; but these have long since become the three northernmost counties of Leinster province. In the Republic each county is administered by an elected "county council", and the old provincial divisions are merely traditional names with no political significance.
The number and boundaries of administrative counties in the Republic of Ireland were reformed in the 1990's. For example County Dublin was broken into three: Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, and South Dublin - the City of Dublin had existed for centuries before. In addition "County Tipperary" is actually two administrative counties, called North Tipperary and South Tipperary while the major urban centers Cork, Galway, Limerick, and Waterford have been separated from the town and rural areas of their counties. Thus, though sometimes called the 'twenty-six counties', the Republic of Ireland now has thirty-four 'county-level' authorities.

         For almost all sporting, cultural and other purposes, the traditional 32 counties and 4 provinces remain in common usage. Each county has its own flag/colours (and often a nickname too), and county allegiances are taken quite seriously

         When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the tuatha.

 

The four provinces are;

         Leinster

         Munster

         Connacht

         Ulster

         Originally there were five provinces but over the course of time the smallest one, Meath, was absorbed into Leinster. During Ireland's golden age these provinces were little more than loosely federated kingdoms with somewhat flexible boundaries, but in modern times they have become associated with groups of specific counties though they have no legal status. They are today seen in a sporting context, as Ireland's four professional rugby teams play under the names of the provinces, and the Gaelic Athletic Association has separate provincial championships.

         The provinces were supplanted by the present system of counties after the Norman occupation in the twelfth century. The Irish word for province, "cúige", means "portion" and/or "fifth", reflecting the original division.

         Six of the nine Ulster counties form modern-day Northern Ireland, which remains a part of the United Kingdom. Northern Ireland is sometimes referred to as a province of the United Kingdom, usually by Unionists. These two usages of the word "province" in Ireland are often confused.


Leinster

         Leinster ( Irish: Laighin or Laigin) is the eastern province of Ireland, comprising the counties of Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, Laois, Longford, Louth, Meath, Offaly, Westmeath, Wexford and Wicklow. Leinster is Ireland's most populous province. The traditional flag of Leinster has a golden harp against a green background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dún Laoghaire–Ráth an Dúin

 

         Dun Laoghaire–Rathdown (Irish: Dún Laoghaire–Ráth an Dúin) is an administrative county in the Republic of Ireland forming part of the traditional county of Dublin. Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown is located to the south-east of the City of Dublin, and has its administrative centre in the town of Dún Laoghaire. In 1994, the area of the Corporation of Dún Laoghaire, the Deansgrange Joint Burial Board and the south-east part of County Dublin were merged to create the county of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown.

 

         The motto on the heraldic crest for Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown reads "Ó Chuan go Sliabh" meaning "From the Harbour to the Mountain". The crown in the shield is that of King Laoghaire, the High King of Ireland in the fifth century, who resided in the area.

 

         Now the smallest county in Ireland, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown is also the county with the longest name. The reason for this is that the titles of the new Dublin county councils were never examined at committee stage in the Houses of the Oireachtas, and were last altered under the 1991 Local Government Act which was infamously rushed into effect. Both parliamentary debates and Dublin County Council’s own reorganization report published in 1992 concluded that the name Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown was “unacceptable”. A one year proviso contained in the 1993 Local Government (Dublin) Act for changing the name of the county at local level was allowed to expire by the new council. The elected members of the council are still in a position to make representations for additional legislation altering the name of the county.

 

 

 

Glencullen Library Centre
Glencullen
County Dublin
Contact: Jennie Conlon

Glencullen is a small picturesque village situated in the foothills of the Dublin Mountains. This part-time library is housed in a Carnegie building dating from 1907.

 

Opening hours

Monday

 

 

 

7.00 - 9.00

Tuesday

 

 

 

3.00 - 5.00

Wednesday

 

 

 

7.00 - 9.00

Thursday

 

 

 

3.00 - 5.00

Friday

 

 

 

7.00 - 9.00

Closed on Saturday.

How to get to Glencullen Centre
Bus : 44B from Dublin
Parking: Very limited
Wheelchair access: No

 

 

Ballyedmonduff

There is a bronze age wegde tomb on the south eastern slope of Two Rock Mountain. It is a rectangular chamber divided into three parts surrounded by a U shaped double walled kerb filled with stones. The tomb was excavated in the 1940's when cremated bone,a polished stone hammer, flints and pottery were found. You can find if from Kiltiernan you take the Glencullen road, turn right at Johnny Fox's Pub, you will come to Glencullen golf course on your left hand side. The tomb is in the woods on the far side of the course about a hundred feet in from the gravel track that surrounds the woods. It is also known as Giant’s Grave

 

 

No. 68/1933: COUNTY DUBLIN (SPECIAL DIPPING AREA) SHEEP DIPPING ORDER, 1933.

COUNTY DUBLIN (SPECIAL DIPPING AREA) SHEEP DIPPING ORDER, 1933.

(No. 130.)

ORDER OF THE MINISTER FOR AGRICULTURE.

(Dated 5th May, 1933.)

     The Minister for Agriculture, by virtue and in exercise of the powers vested in him by the joint operation of the Agriculture Act, 1931 (No. 8 of 1931), and the Diseases of Animals (Ireland) Acts, 1894 to 1932, and of every and any other power him in this behalf enabling hereby orders as follows :—

  Short Title and Commencement.

1. (1) This Order may be cited for all purposes as the County Dublin (Special Dipping Area) Sheep Dipping Order, 1933.

     (2) This Order shall come into operation on the eighth day of May, 1933.

  Application of Interpretation Act, 1923.

2. The Interpretation Act, 1923 (No. 46 of 1923), applies to the interpretation of this Order in like manner as it applies to the interpretation of an Act of the Oireachtas.

  Definition.

3. In this Order—

The expression " the Act of 1894 " means the Diseases of Animals Act, 1894 ;

the expression " the Minister " means the Minister for Agriculture,

the expression " approved Sheep Dip " means a sheep dip approved by the Minister, for Sheep Scab and sheep dipping ;

" Inspector " includes Veterinary Inspector ;

" sheep " includes lambs ;

" owner " includes a joint owner ;

other terms have the same meaning as in the Act of 1894 and the Acts amending same.

  Application of Order.

4. (1) This Order shall apply to the area described in the Schedule hereto, hereinafter referred to as the Special Dipping Area.

     (2) While this Order remains in operation the area described in the Schedule hereto shall cease to form part of "the Dipping Area" to which the provisions of the Sheep Dipping (Ireland) Order of 1915 apply.

     (3) Where any farm or holding is situate partly within and partly without the Special Dipping Area the provisions of this Order shall, notwithstanding anything contained in any other Order of the Minister, apply to the farm or holding and the sheep thereon as if the whole farm or holding were in such area.

  Return by Owners of Sheep in Special Dipping Area.

5. The owner of any sheep brought into the Special Dipping Area on or after the eighth day of May, 1933 shall, within four days after the date of movement of the sheep into such Area, deliver or cause to be delivered by post or otherwise to the Gárda Síochána at the nearest Gárda Síochána Station in the Gárda Síochána district in which the sheep are located a return showing the name and description of the farm or holding or other premises on which the sheep are, together with the description and the number of such sheep so far as such description and number can reasonably be ascertained.

  Dipping of all Sheep in Special Dipping Area.

6. (1) All sheep in the Special Dipping Area on and after the eighth day of May, 1933, shall be dipped by the owner or person in charge of the sheep on such dates, under such conditions and at such dipping places as shall be required by a notice signed by an Inspector and served by post or otherwise on the owner or person in charge of the sheep referred to in the notice.

     (2) Sheep dipped under this Article shall be dipped by a thorough immersion in an approved sheep dip of the whole sheep (including the head and ears). The said immersion, except as regards the head and ears of the sheep shall be for a period of not less than one minute.

     (3) All sheep after having been dipped shall, where practicable, be kept isolated from sheep which have not been so dipped.

  Powers of Entry and Examination.

7. (1) For the purposes of this Order an Inspector of the Minister or of the Local Authority may subject to the direction of the authority appointing the Inspector, enter any premises within the Special Dipping Area and examine any sheep thereon, and such powers of entry and examination shall be in addition to any other like powers vested in the Inspector.

     (2) The owner and the person in charge of any sheep in the Special Dipping Area shall comply with all reasonable requirements of the Inspector as to the collection and penning of such sheep and afford all other reasonable facilities for the examination of such sheep by the Inspector.

  Clipping Before Dipping

8. A sheep shall not be deemed to have been dipped in accordance with the requirements of this Order unless it has been previously clipped in the current year but this provision shall not apply to lambs less than nine months old.

  Restrictions on Movement of Sheep out of the Special Dipping Area.

9. (1) Sheep shall not be moved out of the Special Dipping Area unless they are accompanied by a licence authorising such movement granted by an Inspector.

     (2) Before granting a licence under this Article the Inspector concerned shall satisfy himself by due examination and enquiry that all the sheep in respect of which the licence is sought are free from Sheep Scab and that they are intended for immediate slaughter and are to be moved direct to a slaughterhouse.

     (3) A licence for movement under this Article shall specify the slaughterhouse to which the sheep are to be taken and the route by which they are to be moved. The Licence shall be available for three days and no longer, and shall specify the time within which the sheep must be slaughtered after their arrival at the slaughterhouse.

     (4) Sheep moved under this article shall be moved direct to the specified slaughterhouse and shall not be moved therefrom and shall be kept separate from other sheep.

  Disinfection.

10. The occupier of any premises in the Special Dipping Area shall, if so required by a notice served on him by an Inspector, disinfect, at his own expense, and to the satisfaction of the Inspector any building, pen or like enclosure on the premises, which has been used for sheep.

  General Provision as to Movement.

11. Sheep in the Special Dipping Area, while being moved with a licence under this Order, shall be kept as far as practicable separate from all sheep in such Area which are not being moved with such a licence.

  Provision for Movement through Special Dipping Area.

12. For the purposes of this Order, sheep shall not be deemed to be in the Special Dipping Area or to be moved out of such Area:

(i) where they are moved through such Area by a road vehicle from a place outside that Area to another place outside that Area without unnecessary delay and without the sheep being unloaded within that Area ; or

(ii) where they are walked through such Area by road from a place outside that Area to another place outside that Area provided that such movement is authorised by a licence granted by an Inspector.

  Restriction on Movement of Sheep not Dipped.

13. Where any sheep in the Special Dipping Area shall not have been dipped as required by this Order an Inspector may, without prejudice to any proceedings for the offence, serve the owner or person in charge of the sheep and the owner or person in charge of any sheep then in contact with the undipped sheep with a notice requiring the dipping of the sheep described in the notice and prohibiting their movement from the farm, holding, or other place where they are at the time the notice is served until all the sheep shall have been dipped, after the service of the notice, in the presence and to the satisfaction of the Inspector or have been slaughtered, and thereupon if shall be unlawful for the owner or person in charge of the sheep to move the sheep or permit the sheep to be moved in contravention of the notice.

  Production of Licences, Names, and Addresses.

14. (1) Any person in charge of a sheep being moved where under this Order a licence is necessary, shall, on demand of an Inspector or a member of the Gárda Síochána, produce and show to him the licence, if any, authorising the movement, and shall allow it to be read and a copy of or extract from it to be taken by the person to whom it is produced.

     (2) Any person so in charge shall, on demand as aforesaid give his name and address to the Inspector or member of the Gárda Síochána.

  Local Authority to enforce Order.

15. Without prejudice to Section 43 (1) of the Act of 1894 the provisions of this Order shall be executed and enforced by the Local Authority.

  Offences.

16. Any person committing or aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring the commission of any breach of the provisions of this Order is liable, on summary conviction, to the penalties provided by the Act of 1894.

     Given under the Official Seal of the Minister for Agriture this fifth day of May, nineteen hundred and thirty-three.

(Signed) F. J. MEYRICK.

SCHEDULE.

SPECIAL DIPPING AREA.

     So much of the Administrative County of Dublin as lies within the following boundaries:—

     The road running North from Glencullen Bridge through Glencullen Cross, along the Ballyedmunduff Road, past the quarries at tire Three Rock Mountain to Ticknock Cross, then West to Harold's (range Cross and Kilmashogue Cross, then North to Whitechurch Cross, then West along Taylor's Lane to Ballyboden, then South to Ballyboden Bridge, then Westward by the Scholarstown and Knocklyon Road to the Gate Lodge of Sallypark, then South along the Ballycullen Road to the gate of Orlagh College, then South-East along the Gunney Road to the Kilakee Road, thence to Glencree Cross, then East along the road at the foot of Cruagh Mountain and then South-East along the Pine Forest Road to where it crosses the Glencullen River at the Boundary between Ballybrack and Tibradden then along the Glencullen River to Glencullen Bridge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sources

         A topographical dictionary of Ireland, comprising the several counties,,cities, boroughs, corporate, mark and post towns, parishes and villages, with historical and statistical descriptions embellished with engraving of the arms of the cities, bishoprics, corporate towns, and boroughs; and of the seals of the several municipal corporations: with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, as defined by the act of the 2nd & 3th of William IV. By Samuel Lewis. In two volumes. London, published by S. Lewis & Co. 87, Aldersgate street, 1837

         Dublin Parishes. Author: Donnelly. Short stories of Dublin Parishes. Part IX Parishes of St. James and St. Catherine.

         Dublin Pairshes. Author Donnelly. Short stories of Dublin Parishes. Part V Parishes of Sandyford, Glencullen, Killiney, Bray and Cabinteely.

         Wakeman, Vol. XXI, R.S.A.I. Journal, p. 699

 

 

jorgenpfhartogs's stuukske 

Curriculum Vitae 

County Cup 2006 

Wessem 

Tours around Rathfarnham 

Rathfarnham Roads 

Mountain Meitheal 

Tour 1 

Tour 2 

Tour 3 

U2 tour 

Bray- Greystones walk 

Glencullen Mountain Walk 

Walk The World 

Hill walking advice 

Wicklow as a 3rd degree white water river 

Annual Camp 2006