Bonnington House, by Ratho, West Lothian

1306     
♦ 25 MARCH: CORONATION OF ROBERT I, ROBERT THE BRUCE.
Charter of Robert I to Walter Stewart, of the barony of Bathcat, the lands of Richardtoun, the barony of Rathew, the lands of Bernes, the lands of Boundingtoun, Ednam, Kenpont, &c. Edinburgh.

1331
NOVEMBER: CORONATION OF DAVID II.
Charter of David II to Hew Eglingtoun, of the lands of Bondingtoun and half lands of Nortoun, in the barony of Rathow, in Lothian; ane annual furth of Wefthall.

1371
MARCH: CORONATION OF ROBERT II, THE STEWARD.
6 May: Charter by Robert II to Hugoni de Eglyntoun, Militi, terre de Bondyngtoun, et annui redditus quatuor marcarum et octo folidorum de terris de Wefthall, in baronia de Rathew, in vic. d Edinburgh.
In 1361 Sir Hugh de Eglinton was justiciary of Lothian, and six years thereafter he was one of the commissioners for a treaty with England. He married Egidia, or Giles, daughter of Walter, high steward of Scotland, and sister of King Robert the Second, widow of Sir James Lindsay of Crawford, and soon after the accession of his brother-in-law to the throne, his majesty granted to him certain lands in Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Mid Lothian. He appears to have died soon after 1376. He had an only daughter, his sole heiress, Elizabeth, who married Sir John Montgomery, the seventh laird of Eaglesham, ancestor of the earls of Eglinton. With her Sir John obtained the baronies of Eglinton and Ardrossan, and the large possessions of the Eglinton family, and in consequence of this marriage he quartered the arms of Eglinton with his own.

Charter by Robert II to Hugoni de Eglyntoun, de terris de Bondingtoun, et annuo redditu quatuor marcarum et octo folidorum de terris de Wefthall, in baronia de Rathew, et vicecom. de Edinburgh, on the refignation of Robert de Erfkyne.
Charter by Robert II to Hugoni de Eglingtoun, Militi, et Egidie de Lyndifay forori Regis fponfe fue, de terris de Boningtoun, dimidio terre de Nortoun, et dominio terrarum de Wefthall et Cotraw, cum annuo redditu 4 marcarum et 8 folidoreum de Wefthall et Cotraw, in vicecom. de Edinburgh, tenen. De Rege et heredibus fuis Senefcallis Scotie.
Charter by Robert II to Robert de Erfkyne, Knight, of ane annual duty of 20 l. and 10 marks Sterling forth of the barony of Cadyow, in vicecom. de Lanark, in excambion for the lands of Bondingtoun, and an annual duty of four marks out of Wefthall, in the barony of Rathew and fhire of Edinburgh.

1387
Alexander Montgomery acquires the lands of Bonnington in the Barony of Ratho from his mother, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Hugh Eglinton of that Ilk.

1390
AUGUST: CORONATION OF ROBERT III            
1460
10 AUGUST: CORONATION OF JAMES III AT KELSO.

1469
JULY: MARRIAGE OF JAMES III AND MARGARET, DAUGHTER OF KING OF DENMARK.

1488
11 JUNE: JAMES III KILLED AT SAUCHIEBURN. SUCCEEDED BY HIS SON, JAMES IV.

1513
9 SEPTEMBER: JAMES IV FALLS AT THE BATTLE OF FLODDEN. SUCCEEDED BY JAMES V AS A MINOR.
THE DUKE OF ALBANY ACTS AS REGENT.

1525
? Marriage of Isobel Cunningham, “daughter of William Cunningham of Bonnington” to James Livingstone of Jerviswood. But is this the same family and house?[IGI submitted]

1542
16 DECEMBER: JAMES V DIES AT FALKLAND. BURIED AT HOLYROOD. SUCCEEDED BY HIS DAUGHTER MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS WHO WAS A MINOR. HIS WIDOW, MARY OF GUISE ACTED AS REGENT UNTIL 1563.

1559
MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS DECLARES HERSELF QUEEN OF ENGLAND.

1567
24 JULY: MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS FORCED TO ABDICATE. SUCCEEDED BY HER SON, JAMES VI.

1587
8 FEBRUARY: EXECUTION OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS.

1589
April: King James VI hunted frequently at Hatton, the neighbouring estate to Bonnington. He was there in April 1589 when word was brought to him that the wild Earl of Bothwell was mustering his desperadoes at Kelso, with the intention to seize the King at Hatton. James was hunting again at Hatton in 1591 and 1597. The laird of the time, Sir William Lauder, belonged to the extremer Protestant faction. [Douglas Simpson, 1944-5]
20 AUGUST: JAMES VI OF SCOTLAND MARRIES ANNE OF DENMARK.

1603
24 MARCH: DEATH OF ELIZABETH I.
25 JULY: JAMES VI OF SCOTLAND CROWNED JAMES I OF ENGLAND.

1607     
22 January: Edinburgh, grant by James VI to Lady Margaret Montgomery … the terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. Antique extensus, cum tenenetibus &c. …[Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VI, p. 668, 1838]

1608
2 May: Whitehall. Grant by James VI to James, Lord Balmerino …ejusque heredibus masc. et tallie in ejus   infeofamento terrarium et baronie de Kirknewton alias  the West-baronie, specificatis, - terras de   Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. antique extensus, cum mansionibus, maneriei locis, molendinis, silvis [woods – the only mention in all of the charters], piscariis, feudifirme firmis, tenenetibus &c…. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VI, p. 754, 2073]

James Elphinstone, 1st Lord Balmerino (c. 1 553-1612), Scottish politician, was the third son of Robert, 3rd Lord Elphinstone (d. 1602). Rising to power under James VI he became a judge and secretary to the king; he accompanied the king to London in 1603 and was made Lord Balmerino, or Balmerinoch, in 1604. In 1605 he became president of the court of session, but his Roman Catholicism brought about his overthrow. In 1599 on the king's behalf, but without the king's knowledge, he had sent a letter to Clement VIII. Balmerino later admitted that he had written the compromising letter, that he had surreptitiously obtained the king's signature, and that afterwards he had added the full titles of the pope. In March 1609 he was tried, attainted and sentenced to death, but after a brief imprisonment he was released and he died at Balmerino in July 1612.  
1609
8 October: Grant by James VI to Alexander Drummond of Midhope [of all the lands of Lord Balmerino]… terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. antique extensus, cum mansionibus, maneriei locis, molendinis (piscariis) feudifirme firmis, tenenetibus &c…. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VII, p. 55, 149]

1611
28 November: Edinburgh, Grant by James VI to Margaret Montgomery, Countess of Winton and Alexander Seton of Foulstruther… 10 liberat, terrarum ant. ex. de Bonyngtoun…[Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VII, p. 222, 591]

The 5th Earl of Eglinton, foreseeing he would died childless, made a resignation of his earldom, dated at Seton, July 27, and August 1, 1611, and had a new grant of it, (a practice not unusual in the Scottish peerage,) under the great seal, dated November 28, following, with the former precedency to him and the heirs male of his body. Failing which, the Earldom of Eglinton and Lordship of Kilwinning, comprehending Eglinton, Ardrossan, Robertoun, Dreghorn, Giffen, Wrichty- hill, Torbolton, Methie, Langschaw, and Kilwinning, in Ayrshire ; Eglisham, Eastwood, Langside, Caldwell, and Lochliboside, in county Renfrew ; Bonytoun, and Piltoun, in shire of Edinburgh ; Lochransay, in Arran, and Island of Little Cumray, — were settled on Sir Alexander Seton of Foulstruther, (the son of his Aunt Margaret, Countess of Winton,) and heirs male of his body ; which failing, Thomas and John Seton, and their heirs male ; whom all failing, to his own nearest and lawful heirs male whatsoever, bearing name and arms of Montgomerie” [Montgomery, 1863, p. 61] James VI challenged his right to the title of 6th Earl but eventually granted it to him in 1615. [Bourke]


1613
8 July: Edinburgh, grant to John, [2nd] Lord Thirlstane… terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. Antique extensus, cum mansionibus, maneriei locus, molendinis, piscariis, feudifirme firmis, tenenetibus &c…. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VII, p. 321, 876]

John, 2nd Lord Maitland of Thirlestane was the son of Sir John Maitland, 1st Lord Thirlestane by his spouse Jean, only daughter and heiress of the 4th Lord Fleming (subsequently Countess of Cassillis); admitted a member of the Privy Council of Scotland on July 20, 1615. On April 2, 1616 he was created Viscount of Lauderdale, by Letters Patent, to him and his heirs male and successors in the lordship of Thirlestane. He was subsequently made President of the Privy Council, and was appointed an Ordinary Lord of Session on June 5, 1618. He was at that time one of the Commissioners for the Plantation of Kirks. On March 14, 1624, at Whitehall, London, he was created, by patent, Earl of Lauderdale, Viscount Maitland, and Lord Thirlestane and Boltoun.[adapted from Wikipedia]


1614     
3 September: Windsor, Grant by James VI to John, [2nd] Lord Balmerinoch…terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. Antique extensus, cum mansionibus, maneriebus, molendinis, piscariis,     feudifirme firmis, tenenetibus &c…. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VII, p. 407, 1115]

John Elphinstone, 2nd Lord Balmerinoch was the son of Sir James Elphinstone, 1st Lord Balmerinoch and Sarah Monteith. On 4 August 1613 he was restored to the blood by Royal letters. He married Ann Kerr, daughter of Sir Thomas Ker of Fernyhurst (and sister of Robert Ker, Earl of Somerset) on 30 August 1613 and died on 28 February 1648/49 at Edinburgh, from apoplexy. He was buried on 1 March 1649 in the Logan isle, at Restalrig. Between 3 December 1634 and 20 March 1635 he was tried and convicted for joining in a petition to the Crown against grievances. He held the office of President of the Scottish Parliament in 1641 and was a Lord of Session between 1641 and 1649. In 1648 he was one of those who rescued the King from his imprisonment.

1618     
THIRTY YEARS WAR BEGINS ON THE CONTINENT.
1625     
27 MARCH: DEATH OF JAMES VI AND I.
1626     
2 FEBRUARY: CORONATION OF CHARLES I IN LONDON.
1628
The lands of Easter and Wester Bavelaw were granted by the King to Laurence Scott of Harperrig, advocate in 1628. A manor house and tower existed on the site which was built by Walter Dundas, so some of the fabric may date to an earlier period, although Scott enlarged the existing house and is responsible for its present appearance.[Historic Scotland]
1629     
19 February: Holyrood House, Grant by Charles I to Laurence Scott of Harperrig, advocate and his son, James Scott… terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. antiqui extensus, cum mansione, manerie, molendinis, piscariis, feudifirmis, tenenetibus &c, vic. Edinburgh …. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. VIII, p. 465, 1374]

Laurence Scott of Harprrig, son of James Scott of Scotsloch, Irvine, d. December 1637. Married Elizabeth, daughter of William Pringle, litster [a dyer of cloth], Burghess of Edinburgh. Elizabeth died November 1660. Clerk to the Privy Council, Clerk of Session and Clerk of Parliament. Admitted to the Faculty of Advocates, 6 January 1607. Witnessing documents for  Hugh 5th Earl of Eglinton from 1610, if not before.

Sir William Scott, of Clerkington, Lord Clerkington (d. 1656), judge, was the eldest son of Laurence Scott of Harprig. He succeeded his father in December 1637 and was knighted by Charles I in November 1641. He was a member of the committee of war in 1644, 1646, 1647, and 1649 and, after the enactment of the Act of Classes (1649), barring from office those involved in the engagement with Charles I, was appointed an ordinary lord of session on 7 June 1649, taking the title Lord Clerkington. He was a member of the committee of estates (1649, 1651), and a commissioner to parliament for the shire of Edinburgh in 1650–51. He joined Argyll in March 1651 in unsuccessfully opposing moves to admit some of those excluded from civil office since 1649 to the committee to manage the army. He was a commissioner of supply in 1655. Contemporaries considered him competent, and he was described by Nicoll as ‘a verry guid judge’ (Nicoll, 188).
            Scott and his first wife, Catherine, daughter of Morison of Prestongrange, whom he married on 4 October 1621, had three children: Laurence, his heir, William, and Catherine, who married Hugh Montgomerie of Bridgend. By his second marriage, to Barbara, daughter of Sir John Dalmahoy, bt, he had four sons and three daughters: Barbara, Agnes, John of Malleny, Frances, Alexander, James of Scotsloch, and Robert, dean of Hamilton. He died of apoplexy in Edinburgh on 23 December 1656.[DNB]


1630
18 August: Marriage of James Scott and Violet Pringle [IGI, date submitted, Grant 1944]
1632
22 September: Christening of a daughter Violet, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1633
18 JUNE: CORONATION OF CHARLES I AS KING OF SCOTLAND AT HOLYROOD.
1634
2 April: Christening of a son Laurence, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
11 June: Laurence Scott, advocate carries the arms of Walter, 1st Earl of Buccleugh at his funeral in St.  Mary’s Church, Hawick. [http://www.james.com/border_scott/]
1635
7 November: Christening of a daughter Elizabeth, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1636
20 December: Christening of a son Laurence, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1637
6 December: Christening of a son Robert, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1638
6 December: Christening of a son William, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1641     
17 August: Scottish Parliament, Ratification to Master James Scott of Bonnington. See Appendix I below. [NAS, PA2/22, f.251v-253r]
1642     
6 November: Christening of a daughter Elizabeth, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
Nsd: Birth of Hugh Cunningham, later ‘of Bonnington’[Information from his tomb]
1647
16 March: Christening of a daughter Jean, by James Scott and Violet Pringle, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1648     
7 January: Edinburgh, Charles I to James Scott of Bonytoun… necnon  decimas garbales et decimas rectorie ville, terrarium et terrarium dominicalium de Bonytoun  et terrarium molendinarium earundem, vic. Edinburgh …. [Reg.  Great Seal, Vol. IX, p. 704, 1892]
9 September: Sasine for “John” Scott of Bonytoun, [NAS,   , vol. 36 f. 228]
1649     
23 May: Charter in favour of Mr James Scott of his gift granted to him by the Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariston, Lord Clerk Register as one of the clerks of session and parliament. Ratified by Scottish Parlaiment, 7 August 1649. [See Appendix I]

James Scott of Bonnytoun, second son of Laurence Scott of Harperig, advocate, died before 1668. Married first, 18 August 1630, Violet Pringle, daughter of Robert Pringle, WS. Married secondly, December 1703, Margaret, eldest daughter of William Elliot of Stobbs and widow of William Bennet of Grubet, parson of Ancrum. He was made Deputy Lord Clerk Register, Clerk of Session and Clerk of Parliament in place of and on the appointment of his brother Sir William Scott of Clerkington as a Lord of Session in 1649. Admitted to Faculty of Advocates, 8 June 1649.


1650
SEPTEMBER: CHARLES II DEFEATED AT BATTLE OF DUNBAR.
1651
11 JANUARY: CHARLES II CROWNED KING OF SCOTLAND AT SCONE.
3 SEPTEMBER: CHARLES II DEFEATED AT BATTLE OF WORCESTER, GOES TO FRANCE.
1653
28 August: Christening of a son Gilbert, by James Scott and his second wife Margaret Elliot, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1654
15 August: Marriage of John Scott and Margaret Elliot, Ashkirk, Roxburghshire [IGI] This may be James    Scott – see  Sasine registered in the name of John Scott for Bonnington, 9 September 1648.
1661
23 APRIL: CORONATION OF CHARLES II.
1668
12 October: Death of Barbara Scott, daughter of James Scott of Boninton ‘deceased’? Interred in Greyfriar’s  Churchyard, Edinburgh. [Paton, 1902]
1674
3 August: Marriage of James Scott and [his third wife?] Isoble Pringle, Athelstaneford, East Lothian. [IGI] Is this James Scott of Bonnington? – but see 1668 and 1687
1675     
22 January: Gilbertus Scott de Bonytoune, hæres masculus talliæ et provisionis Magistri Jacobi Scott de   Bonytoune, patris, - in terris de Bonytoune extendentibus ad 10 libratas terrarum antiqui extentus, per      annexationem infra baroniam et vicecomitatum de Renfrew: - A.E. 10l. N.E. 46l. 13s. 4d. taxatæ divoriæ.
24 February: Hugh Cunningham appointed Dean of Guild, Edinburgh on payment of ‘fourscore ten    pund Scots’ [ECA, SL141/1/4]
10 March: Death of Gilbert Scott of Bonnington? Interred in Greyfriar’s Churchyard, Edinburgh. [Paton 1902]
3 August: March: Christening of a daughter Jean, by James Scott and Isobel Pringle, Athelstaneford, East Lothian [IGI]
1676
March: Christening of a daughter Marion, by James Scott and Isobel Pringle, Athelstaneford, East Lothian [IGI]  See 1687.
1681
15 December: marriage of Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish. [IGI] Some say she was the daughter of the Rev. Alexander Moncrieff, minister of Scoonie in Fife. This needs further work. This is often confused with the marriage in 1782 – see.
1682
25 May Carolus Scott de Bonyntoune, hæres masculus talliæ et provisionis Gilberti Scott de Bonyntoune, fratris germani, - in terris de Bonyntoune extendentibus ad 10 liberatas terrarum antiqui extentus, per      annexationem in baronia et vicecomitatu de Renfrew.  A.E. 10l. N.E. 40l. taxatæ divoriæ   xxxvii.180.
18 September: Christening of a daughter, Anna by Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish    [IGI]
1684
17 January: Christening of a daughter, Elizabeth  by Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1685
6 FEBRUARY: DEATH OF CHARLES II. SUCCEEDED BY HIS BROTHER JAMES II.
2 April: Christening of a son, Alexander by Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish    [IGI]
23 APRIL: CORONATION OF JAMES II.
1686
18 May: Christening of a son, James by Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1687
?Marriage of Rev. John Lumsden to Marion Scott, said to be a daughter of James Scott of Bonnington, at Lauder, Scottish Borders. [IGI submitted entry – probably incorrect date]

John Lumsden, 1685 M.A. (St Andrews, 26th July 1670) ; minister of St Mungo about 1676 ; trans, to Dalgety in 1680; trans, to Second Charge, Canongate, in 1682; trans, and inst. 16th April 1685 ; deprived by the Privy Council, 9th Aug. 1689, for neither reading the Proclamation of the Estates nor praying for William and Mary, but for the late King, that God "would give him the necks of his enemies and the hearts of his subjects." In 1701 he lived at the head of Patrick Steils Close, Edinburgh. He married Marion, daughter of James Scott of Bonnington, and had issue; Charles. [Peterkin s Constitution of the Church. ] [Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae]


1688
13 July: Marriage of James Scott and Marion Cunningham, Edinburgh Parish. [IGI] James was Sheriff Clerk of Edinburgh in 1724. [NAS, B52/14/56] Was he a son of James Scott, advocate? The IGI has a submitted entry for such a birth, c, 1637, which cannot be accurate.
1689
11 APRIL: CORONATION OF WILLIAM & MARY.
27 JULY: THE BATTLE OF KILLIECRANKIE.
November: Hugh Cunningham elected one of the Masters of Pauls Work, City of Edinburgh.
17 December: Marriage of Charles Scott and Margaret Rutherford, Edinburgh Parish [IGI] Was he the son of Gilbert Scott, mentioned in the Charter of 1682?
1690
13 July: Christening of a daughter, Catherine  by Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]. Catherine would marry George Smollett, 2nd of Bonhill, who died in 1738.
Hearth Tax records [NAS. E69/3/1 ff.7 and 14] See

1692
3 FEBRUARY: MASSACRE OF GLENCOE.
Nsd: Hugh Cunningham elected to Edinburgh Town Council
1693
13 May: Birth of a son, Hew to  Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
1694
16 May: Hugh Cunningham offers the City of Edinburgh a bond for £4,000 [TC Minutes, Armet   Extracts…1689-71]
Nsd: Hugh Cunningham elected a Water Baillie of Leith and appointed a Burgess of the Canongate ‘for most generous and good deeds'. 

1697
11 January: Birth of a son, Matthew to  Hugh Cunningham and Anna Moncrieff, Edinburgh Parish [IGI]
3 March: Reference to Hugh Cunningham, Baillie of Edinburgh in the Darien papers. Also “Hugh Cunningham, merchant in Edinburgh, conform to the deputation from Mathew Moncreiff of Collforgie, .    . . . . [£]100”. Was this the extent of his engagement? [See: The Darien Papers]
1699
16 August: Contract between George Home, Lord Provost of Edinburgh, Hugh Cunningham and George   Warrander, bailies, and others, assuming Lieut. Col. George Wishart and John Campbell, merchant, Edinburgh, as copartners in the tack of the Inland Excise set by the Treasury on 24 March 1699 [NAS, GD214/610]
1700
Nsd: [1700?] Copy petition to Chancellor and Treasury of George Warrender and Hugh Cunningham, late bailies of Edinburgh. George Watson, merchant there, and Robert Inglis, goldsmith, for repayment of money advanced by them to Sir William Denholm, master of the Mint [NAS, GD224/1058]
Nsd: Hugh Cunningham elected as Master of the Merchant Company of Edinburgh. Served until 1701
1701
20, 28, 29 May & 5 June: Contract of partnership between Sir George Home of Kello, late Provost, Hugh Cunningham and George Warrender, merchants, late baillies, Samule Mclellan and John Campbell, merchants, Lieut. Colonel Wishart and Harry Rollock of Woodsyde, touching the tack of the excise and cess. Dated London and Edinburgh [ECA, Moses bundle No. 4889]
1702
23 APRIL: CORONATION OF QUEEN ANNE.
6 October: Hugh Cunningham of Bonnington elected Lord Provost of Edinburgh.  
1703
15 February: Hugh Cunningham, Lord Provost, convenes a visitation to the University of Edinburgh in the University Library to challenge a group of masters for setting up an independent faculty [Dalzel, Innes and Laing, 186,2 pp. 279-80]
31 May: Heritable Bond for 1000merks, by Thomas Moffat, merchant, to Hugh Cunningham, present Lord Provost, security of rent for his dwelling house and cellar [ECA, Moses Bundle 4977]
17 & 24 September: Contract between Sir George Home of Kello, Sir Henry Rollo of Woodside, Daniel Stewart, brother of Sir William Stewart of Castlemilk,  George Warrender, Sir  Hugh Cunningham, present Lord Provost and Mr. John Montgomery of Wrae, Samuel Mclellan and John Campbell, merchants, contractors with H. M. Treasury for the last two years of the excise duty of 3d on the pint of ale and excise upon other liquors, set to Mr. Archibald Dunbar of Thunderton for which that have to advance £10,000stg with certain obligations and …… as co partners [ECA, Moses Bundle 7931]
1704
Hugh Cunningham petitions the City of Edinburgh to be granted a burial plot in Greyfriars Churchyard 
1705
24 March: Account of the estate of the late James Stewart, advocate, Town Clerk, left in trust to Sir James Stewart, H. M. advocate and Sir Hugh Cunningham of Craigend, Lord Provost and others [ECA, Moses Bundle 5103]
1706     
THE ACT OF UNION CLOSES THE SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT.
1708
15 April: William Mitchell and Margaret Cunningham (daughter of Sir Hugh C, of Craigend) had a son, Andrew who married his second cousin Barbara, only daughter and heiress of Thomas Mitchell Esquire of Thainstone. She died in 1728, having a daughter Barbara, her heiress. [See Forbes Mitchell Family] Margaret's birth not recorded but she is mentioned below [1710]. Margaret married William Mitchell in Edinburgh, Canongate, 29 October 1705 but she is described as Margaret Cunningham or Stewart [IGI] Craigend house by Stow belonged to the Mitchell family before they changed the name to Mitchell in 1752 [See Craigend House]

1710
29 May: Disposition and Tailzie by Sir Hugh Cunningham of Craigend, of the lands of Craigend in the Lordship and Barony of Stow, Regality of St. Andrews & Sheriffdom of Edinburgh; lands of Bonnytoun extending to a ten pound land of old extent, in the Sheriffdom of Edinburgh; lands of Whitehill & Burnhouse in the barony of Calder... Obligation upon Margaret and Catherine Cunningham, daughters of Sir Hugh Cunningham to present and maintain one poor child of the surname of Cunningham from time to time in the Merchant Maiden Hospital in Edinburgh. Liberty to Alex. Cunningham, eldest son to Sir Hugh Cunningham to burden the said lands with sum of 15 thousand pounds and to others, heirs of Tailzie, to burden with £10,000…. Dated 4 December 1710. Goes on to list other lands in security. [NAS, Index to Entailed Estates, 115, vol. 4, f. 249]
16 December: Death of Hugh Cunningham of Bonnington. Buried in Greyfriars Churchyard, Edinburgh.
1711
In a memorandum written by Rev. John Liston, c.1711 he stated that David Wilkie, son of James Wilkie (d. 1640) and Janet Wilson, is living at Bonnington head and  his father at Rathobyres. [McCall, 1890] I suspect that Bonnington head was the farm just beyond the big house and now used as the education centre. [JR]
1712
“King Robert having now triumphed over the English, invaded their nation, guarded the borders, strengthened, enriched and inspired his people, freed himself of Boscm enemies of whatsoever names, made an advantageous alliance or association with a confederated faction of an oppressed neighbouring people, feuled the succeflion of the crown, and married1 his daughter Lady Marjory to Walter Lord Stewart of Scotland - one of the most deserving of his subjects, to whom he gave in frank marriage of the Baony of Bathcate, the Lands of Ricartoun and Rathow, also the lands of Wermse Eryncaith, Gallowhill, Bondingtoun, and the lands called Burome contiguous and adjacent to the town and loch of Lithgow….”[David Symson: An Historical and Genealogical Account of the Most Illustrious Family of Stewart, Edinburgh 1712, with spelling corrections JR]
1714
1 AUGUST. DEATH OF QUEEN ANNE.
20 OCTOBER: CORONATION OF GEORGE I.
1715
SEPTEMBER: THE EAR OF MAR RAISES THE ROYAL STANDARD AT BRAEMAR.
13 NOVEMBER: BATTLE OF SHERIFFMUIR.
1719
John Slezor publishes his Theatrum Scotiae. 
1724
12 February: Bond to City of Edinburgh by Dame Anna Moncrieff for £550 [c.£43,000 today], payable at Candlemas 1732 [ECA, Moses Bundle 6127] [I could only find re-payments of £400 in 1731-2]
1725
Dalmahoy House built for George Dalrymple, son of the 2nd Earl of Stair by William Adam. Said to have been finished in this year and sold, c. 1750 to the Earl of Morton.[McWilliam, 1978]
1727
11 OCTOBER: CORONATION OF GEORGE II.
1731
2 June: Order to pay Mr. [Alexander?] Cunningham of Bonnington part of the debt due to him and his mother by the Good Town [of Edinburgh] out of the money consigned by Baillie Flint and cash account. £250 stg plus £4 10s interest [c.£21,000 today] [ECA, Town Council Minutes Vol. 53 pp. 370-1]
1732
2 February: Order to pay Mr. Cunningham of Bonnington principal £150 and interest £5 1s 3d due to him. Total [c.£13,000 today] [ECA, Town Council Minutes Vol. 54 p. 13]
1739
Matthew Wilkie of Echlin appointed executor of the will of James Liston of Overnewliston. [McCall, 1890]
1745
23 JULY- 3 AUGUST: PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD ARRIVES IN ERISKAY, WESTERN ISLANDS.
17 SEPTEMBER: THE PRINCE ENTERS EDINBURGH.
5 DECEMBER: RETREAT TO DERBY. VARIOUS ACTS OF PARLIAMENT FORBID THE WEARING OF HIGHLAND DRESS [IN FORCE UNTIL 1780] AND PLAYING OF THE PIPES.
16 APRIL: BATTLE OF CULLODEN.
20 SEPTEMBER: PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD SAILS FOR FRANCE.
1754
Mrs Margaret Cunningham of Bonnington, of the lands of Whitehill and Burnhouse, in the barony of Calderclear and old regality of Dalkeith [she is a Buccleugh vassal] [NAS, GD224/376/8] But is this the same Bonnington? 
1755
13 March: William Wilkie married his second cousin, Janet Liston, daughter of James Liston of  Overnewliston and aunt of Sir Robert Liston, British Ambassador to Turkey. [McCall, 1890].
28 October: Christening of Matthew Wilkie son of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]. He purchases Bonnington in 1804.
1757
17 February: Christening of James Wilkie son of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]. Died before 1764.
15 July: Christening of Adam Cunningham Durhan, son of Adam Cunningham Durham and his wife, Margaret Cunningham at Canongate, Edinburgh, [also registered at Ratho – born there? [IGI]
1758
21 August: Christening of Anna Janet Wilkie daughter of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]
1760
19 August: Christening of William Wilkie son of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]
1761
22 SEPTEMBER: CORONATION OF GEORGE III.
1762
8 June: Christening of Janet Wilkie daughter of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]
1763
2 February: Testament dative (i.e. he died intestate) and inventory of Sir Hugh Cunningham of Bonnington. Given up by Adam Cunningham Durham of Bonnington , husband to and having best knowledge, & behalf of Mrs. Margaret Cunningham, his spouse. Which Margaret Cunningham as being grand-daughter of said defunct is his only executor…nearest in kin discerned and that by decree of the Commissar of Edinburgh as the same, dated 26 January 1763. Inventory: The defunct had owing to him £82 3s 3d sterling with interest of £42 0s 1d since 3 September 1762, (£124 3s 4d or c.£9,000 today) due by decreet of accompt and reckoning among the representatives of the tax men of the customs before the Union, pronounced by Lords of Session of date, 4 August 1762…. [NAS, CC8/8/119 f. 511]
1764
17 February: Christening of James Wilkie son of  William Wilkie and Janet Liston at Dalmeney [IGI]
1782
February: Adam Cunningham of Bonnington marries Jean Moncrieff, [17.05.1757 - 01.1826] daughter of Sir William Moncrieff of that Ilk, 4th Baronet [11.02.1732 -  28.09.1784, 2nd son] and his wife, Clara Guthrie. [Stirnet]
1785
18 November: Birth of Sir David Wilkie, son of Rev. David Wilkie and Isobel Litester. Christened at Cults, Fife, 4   December.[IGI] He moved to London in 1805, was appointed His Majesty's Limner for Scotland in 1823, was       Knighted in 1830 and died at sea in 1840. The Wilkies of Rathobyres, Cliftonhall and Bonnington were his cousins. [McCall, 1890]
1791
5 June: Grizel Agnew, daughter of Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw, seised Bonnington [estate] with the mill and mill lands and other lands including Craigend, in security of £500 in bond by Alexander Cunningham of Bonnington to James Durham of Largo, 23 November 1733. Pr. Clare Constat by Margaret Cunningham of Bonnington to James Durham of Largo, as heir to said James Durham, his father, 28 February 1756. Disposition and Assignation by him to Sir Thomas Brand, Usher to His Majesty and Jean Home his spouse in con fee, 18 March 1756. Pr of Clare Constat by the said Margaret Cunningham to the said Jean Home, now spouse to Alexander Stevenson of Mountgreenan, WS, 18 January 1774. Disposition and assignation by her and the said Alexander Stevenson, his father, 16 September 1763. Disposition and assignation by him to the Society in Scotland for propagating of Christian Knowledge, 25 January 1774, on disposition ns assignation by the said Society, 16 November 1790. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 358. 1]
1792
7 July: William Wilkie (b. 1760?) marries Elizabeth Kidd at Kirkliston, West Lothian [IGI]
22 October: William Cunningham of Bonnington marries Elizabeth Gay King, daughter of James King of Drums, Renfrewshire, in Edinburgh [Grant, 1922] She (Elizabeth Gray King) died 15 April 1840 [NAS,    SC70/1/59 f. 755] But is this the same Bonnington?
1793
10 July: Christening of Elizabeth Wilkie, daughter of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston.[IGI]
1795
26 March: Christening of Janet Wilkie, daughter of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]
1796
1 August: Christening of William Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]  He dies at Bonnington in 1863.
1797
18 December: Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington, Ratho, marries Amelia Hamilton, daughter of Archibald Hamilton, writer in Hamilton, in Tolbooth Parish, Edinburgh [Grant, 1922]
1798
9 July: Christening of Archibald Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI] He inherits Bonnington from his brother William in 1863 but his sister Mary has residence for her life.
Description of the road between Burnwynd and Mid Calder…’on the east is Bonnington – William Cunningham Esq.’ [John Carey, Carey’s New Itinerary (London, 1798)]
1799
29 March: Christening of William Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
1801
23 January: of Archibald Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
Description of the road from Edinburgh to Glasgow… ‘On the right Hatton House – Lord Cullen, beyond on right, Bonnington - W. Cunningham Esq.’ [Kearsley’s Traveller’s Entertaining Guide through Great Britain, (London 1801)]
Thomas Aitchison’s Edinburgh and Leith Directory, 1801: Miss Cunningham of Bonnington – 6 Castle Street. Mrs. Cunningham of Bonnington, 63 George Street.
1802
7 August: Christening of Matthew Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
1803
19 December: Christening of Anne Wilkie, daughter of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]
1804
28 August: Christening of James Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
8 October: Matthew Wilkie [b.1755] of Newburn seised Bonnington [eastate] extending to a £10 land, not including the mill on the river Almond, on disposition by James Gibson of Ingleston, WS. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 529. 147]
27 November: Trustees of William Cunningham, late of Bonnington, seised Bonnington [estate] extending to a £10, not including mill etc. in security of a £10,000 bond by Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 532. 170]
1805
6 October: Christening of Matthew Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]
1806
25 February: Christening of Catherine Wilkie, daughter of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
1807
12 April: Christening of John Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]
1 September: Christening of Janet Wilkie, daughter of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
1808
29 January: Trustees of Grizel Agnew, daughter of Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw, seised the £10 land of Bonnington [estate] and other lands in security of £500 in bond and disposition by Alexander Cunningham of Bonnington to James Durham of Largo, 23 November 1733. On charter Adjudication in Implementation and Confirmation by Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 604. 227 ]
30 March: Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington gets Ren. by the Factor for the Trustees of Grizel Agnew, daughter of Sir Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw, of the £10 land of Bonnington [estate] and other lands and of £500 in bond and disposition by Alexander Cunningham of Bonnington to James Durham of Largo, 23 November 1733. Vide 29 Jan 1808. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 609. 128]
1809
6 April: Christening of John Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
28 October: Christening of James Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI]
1810
9 August: of George Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
11 October: Walter Bryden, tenant, Ramsaycleugh seised Bonnington [estate] extennding to a £10, not including mill etc. in security of a £2,000 bond and disposition by Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 666. 155]
24 November: Alexander Gray, tacksman of Lyne, seised Bonnington [estate] extennding to a £10, not including mill etc. in security of a £2,000 bond and disposition by Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 668. 185]
25 December: Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington gets Ren. by the Trustees of William Cunningham, late of Bonnington, of Bonnington [estate] and other lands and of £10,000 in bond. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 684. 271]
1811
18 January: At a ploughing match held by the Ratho Farming Club in a field owned by the Earl of Morton, third prize went to Thomas Robertson, servant to Mr. Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. [The Agricultural Magazine, or Farmers’ Monthly Journal of Husbandry and Rural Affairs…. 1811. (London, 1811) p. 54.
26 September: On Monday se'nnight, Mr. James Wilkie [b.1764?] had been looking after some shearers, who were at work in a field near Bonnington, and having incautiously gone into a field where a young bull was grazing, the animal ran at him, and having struck him on the breast, when attempting to seize him by the horns, there being no means by which he could possibly escape, he was thrown down, trampled upon, and tossed about for some time, when the bull was joined by two bullocks which were feeding with him ; and such was the fury of the animals, that although this melancholy scene took place within view of a whole field of shearers, it was impossible to render him the slightest assistance. When Mr. Wilkie was taken up, he was still alive, with his breast, back, and almost every bone in his body broke ; he was able to speak a little, and drank some water, but expired two hours afterwards [The Annual Register for 1811, a new edition, London 1825, p. 108]
1812
19 April: Christening of Edward Wilkie, son of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
1813
7 August: Trustees of Alexander Gray, tacksman of Lyne, seised Bonnington [estate] extennding to a £10, not including mill etc. in security of a £2,000 bond, corroboration, SB disposition by Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington. Vide 24 Nov. 1810 [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 721. 451]
1814
1 July: Christening of Amelia Wilkie, daughter of Matthew Wilkie and Amelia Hamilton, at Ratho. [IGI]
2 November: Christening of Mary Wilkie, daughter of William Wilkie and Elizabeth Kidd, at Kirkliston. [IGI] She inherits the contents of Bonnington from her father in 1863.
1815
18 JUNE: BATTLE OF WATERLOO. 
1816
11 November: Matthew Wilkie [b.1755] of Bonnington gets Ren. By the Factors for the Trustees under the marriage contract between Elizabeth Cunningham and William Mowat, advocate, of the £10 land of Bonnington and Teinds and of £1000 in bond and disposition to the said Trustees, 2 January 1812. [NAS, Reg. Sasines PR 789. 250]
1818
21 August: Estimate provided by William Wilkie and Andrew Mitchell, “residing at Bonnington” for wright work carried out at a villa in Trinity Grove, Edinburgh, belonging to James Ballantine, printer in Edinburgh. Considering the work to be of poor quality, Ballantyne withheld £149 7s 1d from an account of £312 16s and Wilkie pursued him in an action dated 29 May 1822. Ballantine sought the advice of the architect, William Burn, who’s report agreed that the work was poorly done. The legal row continued until the 1830’s, by then with Ballantine’s trustees, who included Sir Walter Scott. [NAS, CS 228/B/17/53]
29 September: Death of Matthew Wilkie [b.1755] of Bonnington at Bonnington [The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, vol. 82, 1818]
1819
8 May: Trustees of Matthew Wilkie [b.1755] of Bonnington, seised Bonnington [eastate] extending to a £10 land, not including the mill on the river Almond, on disposition by the said Matthew Wilkie, 5 January 1814. [NAS, Reg. of Sasines, PR 852. 117]
1820
21 February and 8 March: The Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway get disposition by the Trustees of Matthew Wilkie of Bonnington to a piece of ground being part of the lower fields of the lands of Bonnington.[NAS, Reg. of Sasines PR878. 126]
1821
19 JULY: CORONATION OF GEORGE IV.
1822
15 AUGUST: GEORGE IV VISITS SCOTLAND.
1826
Letters of Henrietta Ramage 3: - “ The Bonnington Road is almost finished Mr Wilkie has behaved very handsomely sent his carts and horses free of expense.”
Letters of Henrietta Ramage 4: - “Mr William Wilkie of Bonnington has made another elopement from his mothers intempret tongue.
Letters of Henrietta Ramage 14: - refers to Mr Wm. Wilkie visiting Millburn Tower. [taken from the ‘Bonnington House’ website – no reference given]
1831
1 January: Marriage at 45 Montague Street on 23rd, Mr. Joseph Stewart, Bonnington House, to Agnes, eldest daughter of the late John Thomson Esq., Edinburgh. [Scotsman p. 6]
8 SEPTEMBER: CORONATION OF WILLIAM IV.
1832
18 August: Horticultural Competition –North British Professional Gardeners Society – met in Merchants Hall, Hunter Square, Edinburgh – prizes awarded: for the best six yellow turnip, to Joseph Stewart, gardener, Bonnington House.[Scotsman p. 3]
Death of William Wilkie, son of William Wilkie and Janet Liston (b. 1760, aged 72?).
1833
8 June: To Let – the Wester farm of Bonnington in parish of Ratho. 150 acres Scots. Offers to Matthew Wilkie, 9 Hope Street, Edinburgh until 15 July when the farm will be let. [Scotsman p. 1]
1835
28 March: To Let, the farm of Easter Bonnington, upwards of 300 Scots acres. [Scotsman, p. 1]
27 June: Dinner of the Association of Edinburgh Market Gardeners, in Paxton’s Royal Exchange. Mr. Stewart, Bonnington House acted as croupier. [Scotsman p. 1]   
1836
6 April: Death at Bonnington House, on the 28th ult., Mr. Robert Stewart, much and deeply regretted. [Scotsman p. 3.]
William Wilkie of Bonnington listed as a Land Tax Commissioner [A Collection of Public Statues 1836]
1838
28 JUNE: CORONATION OF QUEEN VICTORIA.
1839
21 September: Game certificates for the year 1839, from 24 Aug – 17 Sept. £3 13s 6d. Schedule D, Edward Wilkie Esq. Bonnington House. [Scotsman p.1]
1845
Bonnington. — The proprietor of the lands of Bonnington, or, as it was anciently called, Bondyngton, of whom mention is first made, is Robert de Erskine. A charter was granted him of L.20 Sterling from the      annual rent of the lands of Cadyon, near Hamilton, in excambion for Bonnington. This seems to have been done with a view to reward the military services of Hugh de Eglin- ton, as a charter was given him immediately thereafter of the said lands, with four merks and eight shillings from the lands of West- hall in the Barony of Ratho. In the middle of the seventeenth century, the said lands were the property of Lord    Collington. They have since been successively the property of families of the names of Durham,    Cunningham, and Wilkie [New Statistical Account of Scotland, Edinburgh 1845, p. 83]
1857
Birth of William Wilkie to Archibald Wilkie of Ormiston and Grace Napier, [IGI] He, an only child, inherited Bonnington from his father in 1883.
1858
Date on the wallhead gutters at Bonnington – presumed to be the date of the alterations to the house. This work has been attributed, quite reasonably, to the architect Alexander Black [1798-1858].
1860
10 May: List of contributors to the Hospital for Sick Children, W. Gibson, Bonnington House, £1.0.0     [Scotsman p. 1]
12 December: Edinburgh Horticultural Society, annual show held yesterday. For market garden produce, Messrs. Miller, Bonnington House. [Scotsman p. 2]
1861
27 February: To Let. Bonnington , 2 small houses of four apartments. Apply to Mr. James Miller, Bonnington House. 1 June ditto – a small house. [Scotsman, p. 4]
1862
14 October: Death of William Johnstone  residing at Bonnington in the Parish of Ratho.

His testament  leaves Bonnington to Alexander Johnston, his brother, in liferent and to Mary Johnstone or Wilkie, his sister[in law], wife of James Wilkie residing at Linburn, West Gate, Parish of Kirknewton and her heirs, in fee. (The document is not clear because it divides the estate into two and gives both halves to Mary).  Testament signed at Bonnington, 9 September 1862 and witnessed by Peter Purdie, wright and George Bryce, day labourer. [NAS, SC70/4/91 f. 281]

            His inventory, at the time of his death refers to houses owned in Bonnington, occupied by George Bryce and David Kitchen. Mary Wilkie is unable to write and simply makes her mark with a cross. She and Alexander Johnstone are said to be residing in Bonnington house and she has entered into the management of the estate. The total estate was £31 9s 3d but a further sum of £54 was in the hands of Alexander Johnstone and this was handed over in March 1865. Mary once again made her mark, having stated that she could not write and she is noted as the wife of James Wilkie, formerly residing at Linburn, now Bonnington.[NAS, SC70/1/120 f. 225 and 1/124]

1863
21 August: Death of William Wilkie of Bonnington at Bonnington House [Chr. 1796]. His testament, made out on 7 August 1863 witnessed by his gardener, James Stevenson and his coachman, John Forrest, both living at Bonnington. Left the house and all contents to his sister, Mary Wilkie or Anderson [b. 1814, married Patrick Anderson, 17 July 1839, Edinburgh], residing at Bonnington, in liferent – “all and whole the mansion house of Bonnington with the gardens, hot houses, outhouses and small grass field next to and in front of the mansion house all as possessed by me and my servants (but not the lodge or dwelling house at the south gate occupied by the forrester)…”. Mary to have an annuity of £450pa.  James Wilkie [b. 1809] residing at Ormiston, his brother to have £200 and his sister Margaret Wilkie or Thomson [married John Thomson, 30 July 1831 at Kirkliston] to have £500 “on condition that she will not make any claim or give any trouble to my heirs or successors, the affairs of my late father, mother, brother or sisters, or attempt to question or impugne the present or any other settlement…”. To Archibald Wilkie of Ormiston [Chr. 1798], his brother and whom failing, James Wilkie his brother, he left all of his estate, with the burden to his sister noted above.  In an inventory at the time of his death, his estate was valued at £4940 10s. His tenants are noted as James Melvin, Bonnington farm and Mr. Leslie, Boghall farm, whose 4eerent was reduced by £37 10s to take account of the house he had built on his farm. Mr. Davison rented the grass parks. [NAS, SC70/4/88 testament and SC70/1/118 inventory]
[I cannot find any record of the birth of Margaret Wilkie mentioned above. Was she a natural child possibly with Margaret Paul, Chr. 26 October 1800 in Cathcart ?(a submitted IGI entry) Could this be the reason for the rider? JR]

1869
23 November: Situation. With eight years good character and 2 years with Mrs. Anderson, Bonnington House. Address: James Witt, Bonnington House, Ratho. [Scotsman p. 1]
1873
10 March: Report on the Cup and Ring marks on Kaimes Hill, Ratho by John Alexander Smith. He was guided to the marks by Mr. James Melvin, Bonnington Farm. Also 13 February 1882. [Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 1873]
1883
24 January: Death of Archibald Wilkie at Ormiston [Chr. 1798], leaving an only son, William Wilkie [McCall, 1890] His Testament signed at Ormiston, 10 July 1871. Left al his property to a group of trustees; his wife, Grace Napier, James Wilkie his brother, George Napier, advocate, Alexander John Napier, WS, James Boyd Fleming, previously surgeon in the Indian army, now residing in Edinburgh. £800pa to his wife at his death to be used for her maintenance and education of their only son, William until he is 25 or marries. She is to have all moveable property outright and the house at Ormiston in liferent. Bonnington was left to his trustees with very detailed instructions on how it could be given to William or retained as they think proper. (There is something rather obsessive about this document!) All else failing, the property was to go to Mary Wilkie or Anderson. On 14 April 1873 he added a codicil giving William, Bonnington without any restriction but that he should work with the trustees in the management of all the estate, including Ormiston and Boghall. On 13 February 1883 Grace accepted her role as trustee and executor but all the others declined and James Wilkie had pre-deceased his brother. In a list of debtors noted: John Forrester, architect £20 and John Hamilton, mason 13/- but these could relate to any of the three properties. [NAS, SC70/4/201 f. 647]
1886
William Wilkie married Maud Murdoch daughter of Charles T. Murdoch, MP for Reading [McCall 1890]
1888
31 December: Death of Alexander Russell Melvin, farmer, Bonnington, Ratho. Lived at Ratho Mains. Debtors   included William Anderson at Bonnington House and others. He owed Mr. Wilkie rent for easter and wester  Bonnington. [NAS, SC&)/1/274 f. 187]
1891
19 November: Important displenishing sale at Bonnington farm, Ratho, belonging to Mr. Melvin, Fixed for  Thursday 5 December. [Scotsman p. 12]
1896
8 August: Death of Mary Wilkie or Anderson [Chr. 1814], sister of William Wilkie and husband of Patrick Anderson, Agency inspector for the British Linen Bank. Left all property to William Wilkie of Ormiston, her nephew. Robert Hog, her coachman, £10, later £20 and later still, £25 (there were codicils added in 1894 and 1896), Peter Hutchison her gardener, £10 ditto, and to Margaret McTavish and Alice Morrison, her household servants, £10 each ditto. To Mrs. Maud Murdoch, wife of her nephew William she left all of her diamonds and other specified items of jewellery. To Jane Anderson, her sister living at Bandoch, Inverkeiller, a gold watch belonging to her late husband, and his broach and portrait. To other sisters, specified items of jewellery. Refers to “an easy chair of coral work grounded in blue and the cushion in crimson, both in my drawing room”; a Dresden china clock in the drawing room. In a codicil dated 13 January 1894 she leaves  her piano, harmonium and musical box to William Wilkie for his son, Archibald S. Hanning Wilkie. In a further codicil dated 13 June 1896 she mentions “my inlaid desk in the dining room and the silver inkstand and cut bottles in the drawing room” [NAS, SC70/ 4/294 and SC70/1/354]
1902
26 JUNE: CORONATION OF EDWARD VII.
1911      
22 JUNE: CORONATION OF GEORGE V.
1926     
St Cuthbert’s Co-operative Association sells Bonnington to Hugh Barr.
1928     
Hugh Barr sells Bonnington to Mrs Mary Elizabeth Leith Malcolm or Henderson.
1930     
Valuation roll - the following people were in occupation. Mrs Mary Elizabeth Leith Malcolm or Henderson and Miss Stella Violet Aline Malcolm Henderson.
1931     
Bonnington passes to Amy Louisa Huntly Henderson on the death of Mrs Mary Henderson.
1936     
20 JANUARY: ACCESSION OF EDWARD VIII. ABDICATED 10 DECEMBER.
1937     
12 MAY: CORONATION OF GEORGE VI.
1938     
Bonnington passes to Mary Henderson after the death of Miss Stella Aline Malcolm Henderson.
1944     
Amy Louisa Huntly Henderson or Moore Dutton, sells Bonnington to Iver Ronald Stuart Salvesen [1901-1957]

1960     
Bonnington passes to Marion Hamilton Salvesen [nee McClure, d. 1997], widow of Ivor Ronald Stuart Salveson.
1978     
The property is sold to Berardino Conte for £40,000.
1979     
The property is sold to T. Boland & Company for £250,000.
1980     
Yhe property is sold to Murray International Metals Ltd., for £108,000.
1989     
The property is purchased by David Farquhar Brewster and Alexander Kinloch Brewster for £550,000.  Plans were put in place to turn the property into a golf club shortly afterwards, however this scheme  came to nothing.
1990s   
The property was let to the religious sect known as the Moonies.
1999     
The property is sold to a Mr. Robert Nelson Wilson & Mrs. Nicola Jane Wilson.
Key:
Purple = Legal Title
Red = Building work
Blue = Furnishings
Green = Landscape and grounds
Italic = Associated information
UPPER CASE = Major events
Bold = Family events


Summary of research findings. 

Bonnington estate in Ratho parish is a great deal more significant than previously believed. This is because the house has not been the subject of any detailed research and because its history is often confused with other early and important properties (Bonnington House in Edinburgh, Bonnington in Lanark, home of the Carmichael family, and Bonninton in Angus).

Records show that the “terras de Bonyngtoun extendentes ad 10 librat. Antique extensus”; the £10 land of Bonnington, of old extent, [roughly 500 acres], was presented by the Stewart Kings to reward loyal supporters and the earliest grants, dating from the 14th century, are to members of the Montgomery family, later Earls of Eglinton. Their influence as feu superiors is dominant until the eighteenth century. 

Contrary to the reference in the Statistical Account, stating that the house was built in 1622, the earliest charter to refer to a “mansionhouse” on the estate is dated May 1608 when the lands were gifted to James Elphinstone, 1st Lord Balmerino [c.1553-1612]. His tenure was short, lasting until October 1609, when he fell out with the King. The first house may thus have been built by the Montgomery family and there is an intriguing reference in the papers of the 5th Earl of Eglinton, recording his debts for 1609. The handwriting is difficult but it reads “Mylne of Polmon[e?]”. Could this be a reference to one of the early members of the Mylne family, master masons to the King in Scotland? John Mylne [d.1621] built the earliest house at The Drum for the 7th Lord Somerville – a house later rebuilt by William Adam around 1725. 

Early charters can be helpful in dating a house but they refer, more often than not, to feudal title and are therefore no indication of who actually lived in the house at the time of transfer of title. The earliest charter to mention a gentleman as being “of Bonnington” occurred on 7 January 1648 when James Scott “of Bonytoun” took possession of the title. There is good reason to believe that he lived in the house as he was an advocate in Edinburgh and he was also the man of business to the Eglinton family, specifically to Lady Ross, wife of Sir Alexander Seton, 6th Earl of Eglinton, daughter of Walter, 1st Lord Scott Buccleugh and widow of James, 6th Lord Ross. 

Bonnington may have been occupied earlier by Laurence Scott of Harperig, father of James, as he had been given Bonnington by Charles I on 19 February 1629 in liferent (in other words, he had the use of the house during his lifetime) and his son and all his heirs, in fee. The charter had a fascinating provision (or blench) in that Laurence was required, at 24 hours notice, to provide the King with a rose noble of gold. In effect this meant that he had the estate for a nominal rental of 16 merks, but only payable at the King’s request. Laurence was a major player at the Stewart Court – Clerk to the Parliament, Clerk of Session and as Clerk to the Privy Council, he was close to the King. It seems very likely that it was he, or his son James, who laid out the grounds at Bonnington with a formal hunting park and it is also just possible that the King hunted there. James Scott was succeeded at Bonnington by his son Gilbert and grandson, Charles. Advocates have a tendency to be conservative in their taste and it seems very likely that Bonnington suffered very few changes until the beginning of the eighteenth century. 

The next phase in the history of the estate requires further research, particularly into the transfer of ownership from the Scott family to the Cunninghams. Hugh Cunningham was designated as “of Bonnington” when he became Lord Provost of Edinburgh in October 1702. He is also confusingly known as “of Craigend” in some documents and in 1711 when he places Bonnington under an entail to his son Alexander, he is known as Sir Hugh Cunningham. Strangely there is no mention of his knighthood on his spectacular tomb in Greyfriars Churchyard and his arms are not recorded in the College of Arms. This harks back to an anomaly in the records regarding Laurence Scott who is also occasionally known as Sir Laurence Scott. The only sensible explanation for this is that both titles were given by the Stewart Court and were therefore only used when it was politic to be associated with the Stewart cause. 

Under the entail of 1711, “Sir” Hugh Cunningham gave Bonnington to his son Alexander with the provision that he could burden the estate with a debt up to £15,000 and his heirs, with a further £10,000. Hugh died in 1710 and once again, further research is required to understand more about Alexander and his sources of income. However, it seems very likely that he was responsible for rebuilding Bonnington house at a date before 1747, when it appeared on Roy’s map as a square house with curved screen walls and large pavilions. A close examination of The Drum on the same map, already mentioned as an example of the work of William Adam in this period, shows the house and one of its pavilions indicated in red ink. The other pavilion is indicated in grey ink and in fact this was never built, a subtlety that suggests Roy’s map is very accurate. In the case of Bonnington house both pavilions are shown in red ink, suggesting they were constructed.

Bonnington has not previously been discussed in relation to the work of William Adam but there are remarkable similarities in its design to other houses by Adam, most notably the Drum (c.1725), the House of Dun (1730). It may also relate to another Adam design published in Vitruvius Scoticus, specified as for “a person of rank” and “not yet built”. 

Relevant points: 
• The great square house at Bonnington is to some extent concealed by the double gables added in 1858 to provide more space in the attic floor, but they do not obscure the two massive chimney stacks, typical of the Adam houses mentioned above. 
• The arrangement of windows (2-3-2) is also typical of the houses mentioned. 
• Perhaps the ‘doubling’ with another block, observed by McWilliam is an incorporation of the earlier house although at the Drum, the earlier Mylne house is incorporated as one of the wings. 
• The building of the house may be related to the bond taken by Alexander Cunningahm of Bonnington for £500 from James Durham of Largo, 23 November 1733 (see 1791). 
• William Adam was also employed on the nearby estate of Dalmahoy for George Dalrymple, Lord Dalmahoy, son of the 2nd Earl of Stair. According to McWilliam, that house was complete by 1725 and sold to the Earl of Morton around 1750. The beginnings of a formal garden (similar to an existing design by William Adam for House of Dun, near Montrose) also appears to be laid out. A design for Dalmahoy, was published in Vitruvius Scoticus. 

In 1804 Bonnington was purchased by Matthew Wilkie of Newburn, on adisposition by James Gibson of Ingleston, WS. This marks the beginning of ownership by the Wilkie family, who had been associated with the estates of Rathobyres and Clifton for many centuries and would still be at Bonnington in the early twentieth century. The painter, Sir David Wilkie, RA, was probably Matthew’s cousin. The Wilkie family genealogy presented here requires more work. The most important question is how the estate came to William Wilkie [b.1796] from his uncle Matthew [b.1755] who died in 1818, apparently intestate. 



Select Bibliography. 

David Hume: Commentaries on the Law of Scotland (Edinburgh 1797) 

Patrick Grant Elchies, Francis Grant, William Maxwell Morison: Decisions of the Court of Session: From the Year 1733 to the Year 1754, Collected and Digested Into the Form of a Dictionary (Edinburgh 1813) 

The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany (Edinburgh 1818) 

John Bourke, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions Or High Official Rank.... ( London, 1836) p. 171 for the Laurence Scot family under Scott of Malleny. 

A Collection of the Public General Statutes Passed in the Sixth and Seventh Year of the Reign of His Majesty King William the Fourth (London 1836) 

Andrew Dalzel, Cosmo Innes, David Laing: History of the University of Edinburgh, from its foundation. ( Edinburgh 1862) 

Thomas Harrison Montgomery: A Genealogical History of the Family of Montgomery. Printed for private circulation [H. B. Ashmead, printer], 1863 

H. B. Mc Call: Some Old Families: A Contribution to the Genealogical History of Scotland, (? 1890 privately printed) 

George Seton: The House of Moncrieff, (Edinburgh, privately printed, 1890) pp. 96-7 

Henry Paton, ed. Register of Interments in the Greyfriars Burial Ground, Edinburgh, 1658-1700, (Edinburgh 1902) 

Henry Paton, ed. The Register of Marriages for the Parish of Edinburgh, 1701-1750 (Edinburgh, 1908) 

Francis S. Grant, The Register of Marriages for the Parish of Edinburgh, 1751-1800, (Edinburgh, 1922) 

M. Wood and T. B. Whitson, The lord provosts of Edinburgh, 1296 to 1932 (1932) 

The Faculty of Advocates in Scotland, 1532-1943, with genealogical notes, ed. Sir Francis J. Grant, (Edinburgh, 1944) 

W. Douglas Simpson, ‘Hatton House, Midlothian’, in Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, Scotland, 1944-5 , pp. 15-26.

See: Bonnington House site for some good pictures.
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