Native Son
What People Are Saying . . .

Reviews and Endorsements

 I enjoyed this book very much!! The first story was amazing and the second book picked up right where the first one left off. Elizabeth is sent by Washington to continue spying among the British. Jon on the other hand is sent into Indian territory to try to convince the Indians that Washington needed them. Jon was captured and became a slave. Elizabeth has no idea if he is dead or alive. The only problem I had with this book was the fact that I now have to wait so long to find out what happens. A must read and a tender story.

—Jennifer Dieleman

 

Ms. Hochstetler’s prose is exquisite, her imagery breathtaking, her research impeccable and her story heart-wrenching. As the sequel to Daughter of Liberty, this story is even richer in drama and anguish than the first and certainly challenges Ms. Hochstetler to surpass these first two books in her next novel. Even if it “only” equals what is already written, it will be a superb piece of writing. . . . If there is a film producer looking for the next North/South series to mesmerize American TV audiences, adapting this series can do it.

—Bonnie Toews

 

Native Son, the second book of The American Patriot Series by J. M. Hochstetler, continues the saga of Brigadier General Jonathan Carleton and the woman who has stolen his heart, Elizabeth Howard. Each has pledged allegiance to General George Washington. Elizabeth’s spy mission sends her gathering information among the Loyalists, while Jonathan’s orders send him deep into Indian territory.

 

When Elizabeth learns Jonathan has been captured by the Indians, she tries desperately to gain information about the man she loves. Unable to learn of Jonathan’s fate, she is forced to continue life with the uncertainty of whether or not he yet lives. Jonathan’s life changes drastically when he becomes a slave to the tribe that captured him. He must make decisions that put him in battle against the people to whom he has pledged his allegiance.

 

Hochstetler examines a little-known aspect of the Revolution by following the hero Jon to the West. People think of the Revolution being fought in Boston and along the East Coast, but there was trouble in the West, too, with the English, the Indians, and the settlers. Hochstetler lets us see that part of the war through Jon’s eyes. Again the reader finds the war-tossed couple, Brigadier General Jonathon Carleton and spy Elizabeth Howard, separated by choice for the good of the new country and your heart breaks at the sacrifices these two make for the ultimate good of many.

 

After Jonathon is sent to Indian territory, Elizabeth ends up in Boston. With wars of all levels—spiritual, emotional, and physical—pressing on them, we feel the anguish they must endure. Rumors circulate and both characters must pretend they care nothing for the other. The story is set in 1775, and the reader is immediately folded into the setting, riding along enjoying every bump and bruise. Even when Carleton is captured, the reader hopes all will be well, although chances are pretty much against that.

 

Elizabeth and Jonathan have the perfect conflict: the American patriot and the British officer. Now they are being kept apart as Elizabeth is pressed back into service as a spy for General Washington. Elizabeth is the perfect society lady, listening in on secrets in Boston, occupied by the British. Her hair-raising exploits sneaking secrets past the ruthless British blockade are the best part of the book.

 

Jonathan, who has a price on his head, can trust no one. He goes West where he was reared and meets the Indians—not all of them friendly—he knew as a child. So wedding plans are put aside while each sets out to carry out the mission Washington has assigned them. As the months pass in silence, Beth wonders if he is even alive. Should she begin to consider a life without him? And as Jonathan is taken farther and farther away from Beth, he fears he will never see her again. How can he go back to her while the war still rages? The British want him dead, and his new life with the Indians has even made him an enemy of his own countrymen. Is their Christian faith and trust in God strong enough to see them through?

 

Native Son is an intensely moving story, impeccably researched and excellently written. It is an intricate look into some aspects of the birth of our nation, and the struggles and temptations faced by two unforgettable characters. J. M. Hochstetler expertly weaves a tale of historical fiction with a romance that must survive the trials and dangers of the times. Outstanding!

 Erika Osborn

Christian Book Previews.com

 

Along with being a great writer, J. M. Hochstetler is also a student of American Revolution history. She has chosen her subject well and her eye for detail comes through in the pages of Native Son, the second book in the promising American Patriot Series.

 

As in the first book of the series, Daughter of Liberty, we are taken back to the dark and troubled days of the early Revolution. The reader is reunited with Brigadier General Jonathon Carleton and Elizabeth Howard, lovers who are being thrust apart by the starkly defined allegiances of the war. Elizabeth, who has been secretly aiding the rebel cause, belongs to a family of staunch Loyalists, while Carleton has openly given his support to General George Washington.

 

Although the two long to be together, their plans are dashed when General Washington requests that Elizabeth continue operating as the infamous rebel spy “Oriole” and sends Carleton as an ambassador of sorts to the Indians. Danger dogs their every step, as Elizabeth works to remain above suspicion while gathering valuable intelligence and British general Gage places an enticing price on Carleton’s head.

 

Native Son is not only meticulously researched, but is an engaging story as well. J. M. Hochstetler has taken a thrilling time in American history and made it come alive with living, breathing characters that a reader can cheer onward. Native Son gets four stars and two thumbs up!

Craig Hart

Native Son is an intensely moving story, impeccably researched and excellently written. It is an intricate look into some aspects of the birth of our nation and the struggles and temptations faced by two unforgettable characters.

 

J. M. Hochstetler expertly weaves a tale of historical fiction with a romance that must survive the trials and dangers of the times. While there are references to events and personalities introduced in Daughter of Liberty, book one in the series, Native Son easily stands alone. Nevertheless, I think you would enjoy it more thoroughly if you read Daughter of Liberty first. Either way, this is a must read.

 

Native Son lived up to my expectations . . . except . . . I could have screamed at the ending! Talk about a cliff-hanger!

—Peg Phifer

Wordsmith Shoppe

 

Elizabeth Howard and Jonathan Carleton fight for freedom from England in the Revolutionary War. The two long to wed, but the demands of war postpone their dreams—perhaps forever. Elizabeth must return behind enemy lines and continue her dangerous game as the spy Oriole, posing as a Loyalist to collect British officers’ secrets, while General Washington sends Jonathan into Indian territory to negotiate with the tribes.

 

Hostiles seize Jonathan and carry him into the wilderness. When Elizabeth hears the news, she can’t decide which to fear more—that the natives will brutalize him or that they will sell him to the British for the price on his head. But what really becomes of him she never would have guessed.

Tense moments abound in this tale of intrigue, adventure and romance set against the compelling backdrop of the birth of a nation.

Romantic Times BookClub, August 2005.

 

Loved it! What a terrific mix of history and storytelling! Real events in our nation’s history come to life as you follow the wonderful storyline and fall in love with the characters. Native Son contains every bit the action and intrigue you loved in the first one, with the romance between the hero and heroine deepening, then undergoing a test as their paths take them separate directions for a while. I can’t wait for the next book in the series.

—Lisa Tuttle

Write On! Newsletter

www.lisatuttle.com

 

Joan Hochstetler has done it again. Native Son, a sequel to Daughter of Liberty, is a great historical novel and sets forth events occurring at the outset of the War of the Revolution. Jonathan Carleton had planned to marry Elizabeth Howard, but when ordered by General Washington to undertake a dangerous mission, he set his personal life aside and journeyed westward deep into Indian territory. In the Indian town of Buck Tooth, he is betrayed and taken captive by Great Owl.

 

Meantime Elizabeth, as Oriole, is continuing to spy on the British forces and her information proves to be valuable to General Washington. She has no way of knowing that Jonathan is in great danger. Her identity is discovered by an unsavory character who promises to keep it a secret if she will yield to his advances. She must continue to search out information for the Americans but now must find a way to protect herself.

 

This book is the second book in the American Patriot Series. I found it to be an accurate representation of history and recommend it to lovers of early American history. I’m convinced that a third book in this series will be forthcoming and I’ll be looking for it.

Robert H. Goss

Round Table Reviews

www.roundtablereviews.com

 

Native Son is the exciting sequel to Daughter of Liberty. It is rich with vivid historical detail of the Revolutionary War period and loaded with information about patriots and British officers. History lovers will find it difficult to set this book aside. Romance readers, however, may be disappointed. Elizabeth and Jonathan are separated for most of the book, but always striving for the day they will be reunited. I was also disappointed with how the book ended, but I realize that a sequel is in the works that I’m hope will result in a satisfying ending.

 

Readers will definitely want to read Daughter of Liberty, book 1 in The American Patriot series first, as Native Son is a continuation of that story. Imagine the movie The Patriot meets Last of the Mohicans and that’s what you have in Native Son. This book is extremely well-written, fast paced and engaging. Ms. Hochstetler’s knowledge of the various Indian tribes’ customs and daily living is quite amazing and intriguing. The faith message is powerful but deftly woven into the story in a realistic way. Readers will be anxiously awaiting the next book in this exciting series.

—Vickie McDonough

Dancing Word Reviews

 

J. M. brings American history to life once more when she reminds us that the Revolutionary War was not a North/South/East war but the West was involved, too. Again we find the war-tossed couple Brigadier General Jonathon Carleton and spy Elizabeth Howard separated by choice for the good of the new country. And our heart breaks at the sacrifices these two make for the ultimate good of many. While Jonathon is sent to Indian territory, Elizabeth ends up in Boston. With wars of all levels: Spiritual emotional and physical pressing on them, we feel the anguish they must have endured. Rumors circulate and each must pretend they care nothing for the other.

Set in 1775, the reader is immediately folded into the setting and the story and rides along enjoying every single bump and bruise. Even when Carleton is captured, we hope, hope, hope all will be well, although chances are pretty much against that. We meet General George Washington as he takes over a raggedy bunch of gung ho men eager to win liberty for the new country. The battles, events, real people actually feel alive as we read.

 

The author is also a historian. This could be a bad thing. When I hear that I think boring . . . dates . . . battles . . . stats . . . blah, blah, blah. But this historian is also a talented story teller and weaves the romance and emotion and a faith thread so it all breaths as one unit and keeps us up until the completely satisfying end.

Linda Mae Baldwin

The Road to Romance

www.roadtoromance.com

 

I read Daughter of Liberty a year ago and thought J. M. Hochstetler brought American history to life in that book. I hoped at the time she’d write a novel about every major battle in the American Revolution. I got my wish in Native Son, but not quite the way I expected.

 

I’d heard of the battles of Lexington and Concord, though I knew precious little about them. In Native Son, Hochstetler examines a little-known aspect of the Revolution by following our hero Jon to the west. We think of the Revolution being fought in Boston and along the east coast, but there was trouble in the west too, with the English, the Indians, and the settlers. Hochstetler lets us see that part of the war through Jon’s eyes.

 

Elizabeth and Jonathan, the star-crossed lovers in Daughter of Liberty, had the perfect conflict, the American patriot and the British officer. Now they are being kept apart as Elizabeth is pressed back into service as a spy for General Washington. Elizabeth is the perfect society lady, listening in on secrets in Boston, occupied by the British. Her hair-raising exploits sneaking secrets past the ruthless British blockade are the best part of the book.

 

Jonathan, now with a price on his head, can trust no one. He goes to the west where he was raised and meets the Indians—not all of them friendly—he knew as a child.

 

Hochstetler introduced me to a fascinating aspect of the revolution here and I’d say more except I don’t want to give away too much of the first book. If you haven’t read that book, I highly recommend you read the series in order.

 

I loved the glimpse into the lives of George Washington as he built his guerrilla forces into a fighting army, and the names and actions of the factual British Generals, intermixed with the fictionalized daring of our heroes. Fiction like this is a great, fun way to teach history.

Mary Connealy

At Home with Christian Fiction

www.athomewithchristianfiction.com

 

Brigadier General Jonathon Carleton has pledged to serve General George Washington in the war against England, and he has promised his heart to Elizabeth Howard. But Washington seems determined to keep Jonathon and Elizabeth apart! He orders Jonathon to take a group of his trusted companions and travel to outlying areas to try and garner Indian support for the American cause.

 

Elizabeth Howard moves among British officers by day and slips across the country-side to give their secrets to the Sons of Liberty by night. Washington plans to keep Elizabeth in the midst of the war, sending her to live among the English in Boston, and later, New York. When Jonathon is captured and beaten by Indians, Elizabeth fears he is dead. And everything does seem to be lost. The Indians are at odds what to do with him. Will they sell him back to the English so he can be killed as a traitor—or keep him as a slave?

 

Native Son is an extremely well-written novel that held my interest all the way to the end. I enjoyed revisiting with Jonathon and Elizabeth, whom I became acquainted with in Daughter of Liberty. I eagerly turned each page, waiting until Jonathon and Elizabeth could be together again.

 

The end of this book is a total shocker. Even as it stands, Native Son is an excellent book, which will remain on my bookshelf. It is an excellent resource for home-schoolers with its expert historical recreations. If you are looking for a wonderful historical fiction novel, Native Son is the book for you. However, if you want to read a series straight through without a huge cliff-hanger to tide you over between books, you might want to wait for Wind of the Spirit before reading Native Son.

Laura V. Hilton

 

Native Son, the second book of The American Patriot Series, continues the saga of Brigadier General Jonathan Carleton and the woman who has stolen his heart, Elizabeth Howard. Each have pledged their allegiance to General George Washington. Elizabeth’s spy mission sends her gathering information among the Loyalists while Jonathan’s orders send him deep into Indian Territory.

 

When Elizabeth learns Jonathan has been captured by the Indians, she tries desperately to gain information about the man she loves. Unable to learn of Jonathan’s fate, she is forced to continue life with the uncertainty of whether or not he is alive.

 

Jonathan’s life changes drastically when he becomes a slave to the tribe who captured him. He must endure decisions that put him in battle against the people to whom he has pledged his allegiance.

 

Native Son is an excellent portrayal of both sides of the Revolutionary War. Ms. Hochstetler’s riveting historical tale goes a step further and takes the reader to another side—the suffering of the Native Americans during this chapter of our nation’s history.

—Marian P. Merritt

 

I couldn’t put J. M. Hochstetler’s new book Native Son down. It was excellent. She has the history down and the fiction part is just so interesting. She also uses three syllable words that most authors today don’t use. It’s nice to read a book that the author has written for the intelligent reader. I will definitely recommend this book to my friends.

—June Simmons

 

Native Son is an amazing and intricately woven sequel to Daughter of Liberty. . . . The author sucked me right into 1775 and I felt like I was living in a dangerous world¾a cross between The Patriot and The Last of the Mohicans. Unlike many historicals, this one doesn’t gloss over the elements of the era, and feels authentic right down to the horrors of war. Temptations experienced by characters are not smoothed over and, in fact, add to the tension and beauty of the story. The different cultures are expertly contrasted, and you feel Carleton’s pain over having to choose, especially being a wanted man on all sides. This well-written novel had me up late and sitting on the edge of my seat, plucked at my heartstrings, then held me captive standing at the finish line, begging for more. This author is changing the face of historical fiction!

¾Michelle Sutton

 

When I read Daughter of Liberty, the first book in this series, I was hooked within the first few pages. When Native Son came out, I was so stoked to read it! J. M. Hochstetler writes in a way that you simply cannot put the book down. As a historical fiction book, it involves a great romance story, suspense, intrigue, war, and everything a reader wants in a book. Out of the many, many, many books I have read, this is definitely one of the best.

¾Katie Pedlowe

 

J. M. Hochstetler strikes again! Native Son picks up where Daughter of Liberty left off and doesn’t let go of the reader even beyond the last word on the last page. Ms. Hochstetler has crafted a story full of intrigue, romance, and heart-racing action, all woven around the most accurately portrayed historical events and settings this reader has ever seen. Her characters¾main and secondary¾come alive on the page and stay with the reader long after the book is over. The spiritual conflict is both touching and challenging. J. M. Hochstetler is a skilled author whose style engages and allows the reader to get lost in 1775... and makes me want to beg for more! I can’t wait to read the next installment.

—Kaye Dacus

 

I have just finished Native Son, and I think it may be even better than Hochstetler’s first book in the series, Daughter of Liberty. The story is just wonderful and I couldn’t put it down. The story, coupled with accurate history, just can’t be beat. But please, please, read Daughter of Liberty first to get the full impact of the story. I can’t wait for the next book.

—Karen Wevick

 

Native Son is so good, I couldn’t put it down. When I finished, I was disappointed there wasn’t more. I just may have to read this one again. I am so looking forward to book three.

—Sarah Topash

 

Native Son is a wonderfully detailed novel from a historian more than skilled in the craft of writing fiction! Hochstetler weaves a rich, descriptive tale with characters that practically leap off the page. The second in a series preceded by Daughter of Liberty, readers join Jonathan Carleton and Elizabeth Howard in further adventures and spiritual growth as they fill their respective roles in the fight for freedom. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Elizabeth’s spy missions for General Washington and the Sons of Liberty, as well as Carleton’s foray back into the Native American culture. As the fight for freedom escalates and the stakes continue to rise, readers will find themselves unable to stop turning the page. Looking forward to the next book in the series!

—Jesse Graham

 

 

Five stars for J. M. Hochstetler for crafting another riveting story wrapped around our nation’s history in a page-turner that both entertains and educates. The characters of Elizabeth and Jonathan are so deeply embedded in my heart and soul now, such that I dreaded reading the last page knowing how long I must wait for the next book in this series! I’m amazed at the attention to detail and setting that literally filled my senses with the sights, smells, and feel of this heartbreaking era of our history. These, along with actual historical figures whose stories are perfectly woven into this fictional account, make this one of those rare books that stays with you long after you finish reading it.

 

Years ago as a young girl, I read Harold Keith’s Rifles for Watie, a historical novel that first taught me about the Civil War from a human perspective. Forty years later, I’ve never forgotten that book and that story, and I credit it with my life-long passion for history. In the same way, I believe this American Patriot Series by J. M. Hochstetler would be excellent teaching tools, making this part of our history come alive for students of all ages. Outstanding! My only complaint is the pending wait for Book 3!

—Diane Moody

 

J. M. Hochstetler’s second book in the American Patriot Series, Native Son, draws readers into the compelling first chapter. Brigadier General Jonathan Carleton meets with George Washington to discuss the patriot troops’ readiness for war against trained British soldiers. Meanwhile, doctor’s assistant Elizabeth Howard ties down a wounded man and helps the doctor amputate the man’s gangrenous leg to save his life. As a patriot spy, Elizabeth faces constant danger of discovery.

 

Although Jonathan and Elizabeth determine to marry at the earliest opportunity, circumstances and General Washington’s orders conspire to separate them. Carleton heads into Indian Territory, while Elizabeth stays behind. They believe God has inspired their commitment to the Patriot cause, but as the separation stretches to months, each struggles with how it will affect their relationship.

 

When Carleton’s negotiations with several Indian tribes turn sour, the Mohawks take him prisoner. Elizabeth wonders at Carleton’s fate as time passes with no word from him. As she continues her work, one of the men helping her discovers her true role and threatens to expose her as a spy. Faced with danger at every turn, both Elizabeth and Carleton draw strength from the God they trust. But will it be enough as the pressures they face slowly change each of them and each continues to wonder about the fate of the other?

 

Native Son holds as much historical detail as the first book in the series, Daughter of Liberty. However, Hochstetler’s clear writing and obvious research make both books intriguing reads. The detail in the medical scenes is exquisite and gave me an eye-opening understanding of Revolutionary War-era amputation and medical care. Fascinating details also enhance the scenes in which the [Seneca] hold Carleton prisoner and in later scenes when he lives with the [Shawnee] Indians.

 

Although Carleton and Elizabeth spend most of the book separated by many miles and different cultures, the strength of both characters easily carries the book. For fans of historicals, this series is a must. Watch for Hochstetler’s third book in the American Patriot series.

—Diana Urban

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Books by J. M. Hochstetler

Daughter of Liberty

Native Son

Wind of the Spirit

One Holy Night

 

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J. M. Hochstetler

American Patriot Series Blog

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