SID#1 News & Info --

There has been some questions with regards to the "end of the SID payments" as a result of the Johnson Lake Lease Negotiations. To clarify, the Service Connection Assessment for those electing the 15 year option will end in 2023. However, the SID Tax Levy covering the General Obligation Loans and Bond Issue will not be paid off in full until approximately 2032.
Check out the recap of these costs at the top of the list of SID Documents.  Please feel free to email SIDclerk@jlake.org if you have any questions.

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The Water Systems Council received a grant in 2015 from EPA to provide technical assistance, training, and educational programs to owners of private and small community water wells.  A portion of the EPS grant monies was used to produce the new Well Owner's Manual.  You can view or download a copy here:
Or, it is available in the SID Document folder on the left.  A printed copy can be ordered by sending an email
to:   egreenstreet@watersystemscouncil.org  and more information is also available on-line at:   www.wellcarehotline.org
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Just a refresher on the three components that are related to SID#1 charges to each property owner:

1.  The first is the Annual User Fee, which covers the annual operational maintenance and repair expenses,  billed on or about May 1st each year, currently $170.91 with sales tax and delinquent on June 15th, then drawing 12% interest on the balance due.  Payments should be made payable and  mailed to: Johnson Lake SID#1, 3 Olmstead Circle, Johnson Lake, NE 68937.  If still unpaid as of September 1st, a Lien will be filed against the property for the total amount then due including past interest and a service fee of $35.  This lien will then draw 14% interest until it is paid in full.  All lien payments must be made to your local county treasurer.

2.  The Sewer Connection Assessment was levied on August 12th, 2009 for each properties share of the collection mains and the actual costs of abandoning the existing septic and cost of hooking up the property to the sewer collection main.  If not paid in full at that time; this amount was due in 15 equal annual installments to be paid annually to your county treasurer before August 12th, plus 5% interest on the entire balance from the date of the last payment.  If an annual installment is not paid before August 12th, it draws an additional 2% interest penalty. The remaining assessment may be paid to the county treasurer at any time in the amount of any number of annual payments plus the then due interest.  If there are 3 or more annual payments past due, the full balance will be called and then draws 14% interest until such time that the property is foreclosed.

3.  The annual SID#1 Property Tax Levy covers the SID's payments on the low interest CW-SRF loans and the Bond Issue that financed the costs of the eleven (11) pump stations, the force mains from each pump station to the next if required and the force mains going to the sewer treatment lagoons; the construction of the four cell wastewater treatment lagoons, the SID maintenance and operations center building, the formation cost and associated legal expense and the annual administrative, auditing and legal expense.   Providing there are no later projects requested of the SID; this amount will drop substantially on or about 2030 to 2032 as these loans and bonds are paid off.  This levy is paid as part of your total property tax annual amount payable to your county treasurer.  The levy % is the same for all; but the dollar amount varies by valuations.

If you should have any questions about these bills, feel free to contact the SID Clerk @ 308-785-2353 or by email:  SIDclerk@jlake.org
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ASSESSMENTS DUE BEFORE THE 12TH OF AUGUST!!

JUST A QUICK REMINDER THAT THE  ANNUAL SEWER CONNECTION ASSESSMENT PAYMENTS  BECOME DELINQUENT AFTER THE 12TH OF AUGUST; THEREAFTER DRAWING AN ADDITIONAL 2% INTEREST FEE ON THE NOW-DUE PAYMENT AMOUNT.  INTEREST OF 5% IS CALCULATED ON THE FULL UNPAID BALANCE FROM THE DATE OF THE LAST PAYMENT.

PROPERTIES DELINQUENT  FOR THREE (3) ANNUAL INSTALLMENTS WILL HAVE THE FULL UNPAID BALANCE CALLED; SUCH THAT IT THEN DRAWS 14% ON THE FULL UNPAID BALANCE AND SUBJECTS THE PROPERTY TO FORECLOSURE ACTION IN ACCORDANCE WITH NEBRASKA STATE STATUTES.

ALL ASSESSMENT PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE TO THE RESPECTIVE COUNTY TREASURER'S OFFICE; AS WELL AS ANY SEWER USER FEE UTILITY LIEN PAYMENTS; WHICH ALSO DRAWS 14% INTEREST UNTIL PAID.

ONLY THE CURRENT YEAR'S SEWER USER FEE; NOW PAST DUE IN THE AMOUNT OF $170.91 plus 12% Interest from May 1st, SHOULD BE MAILED TO THE JOHNSON LAKE SID#1, 3 OLMSTEAD CIRCLE, JOHNSON LAKE, NE. 68937.

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History

When Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District (Central) initially built Johnson Lake and the related system of irrigation canals, no one could have imagined that the lake would one day become one of the most popular recreational sites in Nebraska. But in the late 1940s and early 1950s, houses began going up around the lake and soon there was a large community of private homes and businesses around its perimeter.

The majority of these homes and businesses around the shoreline are located on land owned by Central. All have their own individual septic tanks and drain fields to treat their wastewater. Drinking water is provided by 41 community wells and 35 private wells. These wells and septic tanks must all comply with the requirements of the State Department of Health and the State Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ).

In March of 2000, NDEQ representatives met with JLDI officers and area presidents and explained that many of the properties at Johnson Lake would not be able to meet the setback requirements for septic tanks and drain fields from wells, buildings, lot lines, and shorelines as specified in the adopted State regulations for which they are responsible for enforcement. It has been estimated that 75 percent of the lots around Johnson Lake are too small to meet the new requirements and would not be able to obtain a permit to replace, repair, or expand their septic systems nor could they alter or change their existing buildings.

Routine sampling and testing by NDEQ, begun in 2001, has shown that Johnson Lake contains significant quantities of pathogenic bacteria. Although the source of these bacteria has not been determined, human indicators were identified and the results show that contamination of the lake is occurring and could have a negative impact on the recreational use of Johnson Lake in the future.

In September 2001, Central hired the engineering firm of Olmsted & Perry to assess these issues. In their report of April 2002, Olmsted & Perry reported that:

The implications led the lot owners and leaseholders to decide to create some form of shared governance. By a margin of nearly two to one, with nearly 60 percent of eligible voters participating, they decided to create an SID.

In February 2005, the District Court granted the formation of the Johnson Lake SID and the first meeting of the five-member Board of Trustees took place. 

Phase I (Completed in 2005)

As the project began, there was no single wastewater management method that was clearly the best choice for the lake community. Instead, the engineers and scientists began by studying a variety of options and approaches.

Choosing the Best-suited System for the Lake Community

For collection of wastewater, the alternative sanitary sewer systems considered were:

For wastewater treatment alternatives, the team considered these options:

Much of Phase I study time was spent gathering information about all these options. Then, the team applied a broad range of criteria to each option, including capital construction costs, life-cycle costs, system reliability, regulatory compliance, and public acceptability, in order to come up with their formal recommendation.

The JLET Engineering Team’s Recommendations

For collection: a gravity sanitary sewer system
For treatment: a complete retention lagoon--With future growth, this could be converted to a controlled discharge lagoon.

These are the primary reasons for this recommendation:

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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:10 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:06 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:10 PM
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HUB8-08-06Article.txt
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:10 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:05 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Jan 6, 2011, 11:26 AM
Ċ
Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:06 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:07 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:07 PM
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Larry Ossenkop,
Feb 28, 2009, 7:08 PM
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