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Mini-Archive: "Boston Tea Party" or "the Destruction of the Tea"

Below find pdfs of primary source documents related to the December 16, 1773 destruction of the East India Company's tea in Boston.  We have come to think of this event as the Boston Tea Party, but Americans did not call it that at the time.  According to my research, the first source to refer to "the destruction of the tea" as the "Boston Tea Party" was the February 24, 1826 Providence Patriot, which cited an unnamed source as one of the "40 unknown people dressed like Indians" who "threw overboard 114 chests of tea" and now resides in Cincinnati, Ohio.  According to the Patriot, this Ohio resident often bragged of the part he played in the "Boston tea party."  Please note that the Patriot does not identify the Ohio resident who used the phrase and  they incorrectly accounted for the number of chests of tea destroyed in 1773: there were 342 chests of tea destroyed, not 114 as the Patriot describes.  They also incorrectly identify the number of people involved in the destruction as 40, when other reports have the number at about 150 people.  Below you can find the Patriot's article as well as those immediately after the destruction of the tea (including eye-witness accounts) and various news reports about the Boston Tea Party as Americans remembered it between 1773 and 1842.  By 1842 it was well known as the "Boston Tea Party."

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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:52 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:52 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:51 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:52 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:52 PM
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jennifer mercieca,
Oct 12, 2011, 5:52 PM
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