Jacobs Ladder Piercing

    jacobs ladder piercing
  • A series of frenum piercings (piercings along the underside of the penis that can continue along the scrotum if desired) done in a ladder-like pattern. [top]
jacobs ladder piercing
Azabacheria (Guild House), across the square from Catedral de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, España
Azabacheria (Guild House), across the square from Catedral de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, España
Santiago de Compostela Cathedral (Galician: Catedral de Santiago de Compostela) is a Roman Catholic cathedral of the archdiocese of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain. The cathedral is the reputed burial-place of Saint James the Greater, one of the apostles of Jesus Christ. It is the destination of the Way of St. James, a major historical pilgrimage route since the Early Middle Ages. The building is a Romanesque structure with later Gothic and Baroque additions. History According to legend, the apostle Saint James the Greater brought Christianity to the Celts in the Iberian Peninsula. In 44 AD he was beheaded in Jerusalem. His remains were later brought back to Galicia, Spain. Following Roman persecutions of Spanish Christians, his tomb was abandoned in the 3rd century. Still according to legend, this tomb was rediscovered in 814 AD by the hermit Pelagius, after witnessing strange lights in the night sky. Bishop Theodomirus of Iria recognized this as a miracle and informed king Alfonso II of Asturias and Galicia (791-842). The king ordered the construction of a chapel on the site. Legend has it that the king became the first pilgrim to this shrine. This was followed by a first church in 829 AD and again in 899 AD by a pre-Romanesque church, at the order of king Alfonso III of León, causing the gradual development of a major place of pilgrimage. In 997 this early church was reduced to ashes by Al-Mansur Ibn Abi Aamir (938-1002), army commander of the caliph of Córdoba, Spain. The gates and the bells, carried by Christian captives to Córdoba, were added to the Aljama Mosque. When Córdoba was taken by king Ferdinand III of Castile in 1236, these same gates and bells were then transported by Muslim captives to Toledo, to be inserted in the Cathedral of Saint Mary of Toledo. Construction of the present cathedral began in 1075 under the reign of Alfonso VI of Castile (1040–1109) and the patronage of bishop Diego Peláez. It was built according to the same plan as the monastic brick church of Saint Sernin in Toulouse, probably the greatest Romanesque edifice in France. It was built mostly in granite. Construction was halted several times and, according to the Liber Sancti Iacobi, the last stone was laid in 1122. But by then, the construction of the cathedral was certainly not finished. The cathedral was consecrated in 1128 in the presence of king Alfonso IX of Leon. According to the Codex Calixtinus the architects were "Bernard the elder, a wonderful master", his assistants Robertus Galperinus and Ophiro Gozesse and, later possibly, "Esteban, master of the cathedral works". In the last stage "Bernard, the younger" was finishing the building, while Galperinus was in charge of the coordination. He also constructed a monumental fountain in front of the north portal in 1122. The church became an episcopal see in 1075 and, due to its growing importance as a place of pilgrimage, it was soon raised to an archiepiscopal see by pope Urban II in 1100. A university was added in 1495. The cathedral was expanded and embellished with additions in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Exterior of the Cathedral Each of the facades form with their respective squares great urban places. The Baroque facade of the Obradoiro was performed by Casas Novoa, also baroque is the Acibechería, work by Ferro Caaveiro and Fernández Sarela and modified by Ventura Rodríguez, the Praterías, built by the Master Esteban in 1103, and especially the Pórtico da Gloria, primary work of Romanesque sculpture, completed by Master Mateo in 1188. Pórtico da Gloria Reproduction of the Pórtico da Gloria in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The Pórtico da Gloria of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela is a Romanesque portico by Master Mateo and his workshop at the request of King Ferdinand II of León, who donated for this purpose one hundred maravedís annually between 1168 and 1188, when the latter consisting inscribed in stone in the cathedral as its completion. On April 1, 1188 placed the lintels of the portico and the conclusion of the set was delayed until 1211, at which time the temple was consecrated by the presence of King Alfonso IX of León. The portico has three arches that correspond to each of the three naves of the church, supported by thick piers with pilasters. The central arch is the largest (twice than each side), is the only one who has tympanum and is divided by a central column, the mullion, with the figure of Saint James. Vertically, the lower band is formed by the bases of the columns, decorated with fantastic animals, the middle strip consists of columns supporting the statues of the Apostles and attached the upper arches crowning the three doors. The sculpture is intended as an iconographic representation of different symbols taken from the Apocalypse of St. John and other texts of the Old Testament. Tympanum The arrangement of the tympanum is based on the description of Christ that the
Interior, Catedral de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, España
Interior, Catedral de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, España
Catedral de Santiago de Compostela is a Roman Catholic cathedral of the archdiocese of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain. The cathedral is the reputed burial-place of Saint James the Greater, one of the apostles of Jesus Christ. It is the destination of the Way of St. James, a major historical pilgrimage route since the Early Middle Ages. The building is a Romanesque structure with later Gothic and Baroque additions. History According to legend, the apostle Saint James the Greater brought Christianity to the Celts in the Iberian Peninsula. In 44 AD he was beheaded in Jerusalem. His remains were later brought back to Galicia, Spain. Following Roman persecutions of Spanish Christians, his tomb was abandoned in the 3rd century. Still according to legend, this tomb was rediscovered in 814 AD by the hermit Pelagius, after witnessing strange lights in the night sky. Bishop Theodomirus of Iria recognized this as a miracle and informed king Alfonso II of Asturias and Galicia (791-842). The king ordered the construction of a chapel on the site. Legend has it that the king became the first pilgrim to this shrine. This was followed by a first church in 829 AD and again in 899 AD by a pre-Romanesque church, at the order of king Alfonso III of León, causing the gradual development of a major place of pilgrimage. In 997 this early church was reduced to ashes by Al-Mansur Ibn Abi Aamir (938-1002), army commander of the caliph of Córdoba, Spain. The gates and the bells, carried by Christian captives to Córdoba, were added to the Aljama Mosque. When Córdoba was taken by king Ferdinand III of Castile in 1236, these same gates and bells were then transported by Muslim captives to Toledo, to be inserted in the Cathedral of Saint Mary of Toledo. Construction of the present cathedral began in 1075 under the reign of Alfonso VI of Castile (1040–1109) and the patronage of bishop Diego Peláez. It was built according to the same plan as the monastic brick church of Saint Sernin in Toulouse, probably the greatest Romanesque edifice in France. It was built mostly in granite. Construction was halted several times and, according to the Liber Sancti Iacobi, the last stone was laid in 1122. But by then, the construction of the cathedral was certainly not finished. The cathedral was consecrated in 1128 in the presence of king Alfonso IX of Leon. According to the Codex Calixtinus the architects were "Bernard the elder, a wonderful master, his assistants Robertus Galperinus and Ophiro Gozesse and, later possibly, Esteban, master of the cathedral works. In the last stage Bernard, the younger was finishing the building, while Galperinus was in charge of the coordination. He also constructed a monumental fountain in front of the north portal in 1122. The church became an episcopal see in 1075 and, due to its growing importance as a place of pilgrimage, it was soon raised to an archiepiscopal see by pope Urban II in 1100. A university was added in 1495. The cathedral was expanded and embellished with additions in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Exterior of the Cathedral Overview of the cathedral complex.Each of the facades form with their respective squares great urban places. The Baroque facade of the Obradoiro was performed by Casas Novoa, also baroque is the Acibechería, work by Ferro Caaveiro and Fernández Sarela and modified by Ventura Rodríguez, the Praterías, built by the Master Esteban in 1103, and especially the Pórtico da Gloria, primary work of Romanesque sculpture, completed by Master Mateo in 1188. Pórtico da Gloria Reproduction of the Pórtico da Gloria in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.The Pórtico da Gloria of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela is a Romanesque portico by Master Mateo and his workshop at the request of King Ferdinand II of León, who donated for this purpose one hundred maravedís annually between 1168 and 1188, when the latter consisting inscribed in stone in the cathedral as its completion. On April 1, 1188 placed the lintels of the portico and the conclusion of the set was delayed until 1211, at which time the temple was consecrated by the presence of King Alfonso IX of León. The portico has three arches that correspond to each of the three naves of the church, supported by thick piers with pilasters. The central arch is the largest (twice than each side), is the only one who has tympanum and is divided by a central column, the mullion, with the figure of Saint James. Vertically, the lower band is formed by the bases of the columns, decorated with fantastic animals, the middle strip consists of columns supporting the statues of the Apostles and attached the upper arches crowning the three doors. The sculpture is intended as an iconographic representation of different symbols taken from the Apocalypse of St. John and other texts of the Old Testament. Tympanum The arrangement of the tympanum is based on the description of Christ that the Evangelist John makes in Revelation (Chap
jacobs ladder piercing