2012 Madrid Workshop

Workshop on Challenges of Electoral Integrity

When: 9.00-7.00pm on Saturday 7th July 2012

Where: The Universidad Complutense de Madrid at the Moncloa Campus, Madrid

Classroom 234, and tutorial rooms 23E & 23G, the Faculty de Farmacia building, the Universidad Complutense de Madrid at the Moncloa Campus. The building is a 5 minute walk from the metro station Ciudad Universitaria. Map of campus:

http://www.ucm.es/centros/webs/en/pags.php?tp=Localizaci%F3n&a=localiz&d=plano.php


Description:

IPSA-ECP is organizing a one-day workshop on Challenges of Electoral Integrity in Madrid on 7th July 2012, prior to the IPSA World Congress 8-12th July 2012. The Workshop is generously co-sponsored by International IDEA and by the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems.

A downloadable copy of the program, including all materials, local maps, and a workshop registration form are provided at the bottom of this page

The workshop focuses on the challenges of ‘electoral integrity’, understood as a complex and multidimensional concept which reflects internationally-agreed standards for the conduct of these contests.

Lack of electoral integrity is a major challenge facing the world. This includes flaws in the conduct of elections, raising issues of transparency, accountability, accuracy and ethical standards. Problems of integrity can influence all stages of the electoral process from franchise restrictions and voter registration procedures, boundary delimitation for electoral districts, party/candidate registration, campaigns, media, financing, voting, and vote counting, to the final declaration and outcome of the results. A growing body of research, by scholars and policy analysts, is starting to conceptualize the notion of ethical standards of electoral integrity, to examine techniques commonly used to manipulate electoral processes, and to analyze the consequences for citizens, legitimacy, political stability, democratization and the quality of democracy.

Challenges to electoral integrity arise from a range of techniques which violate internationally agreed standards, with different degrees of severity, such as practices which fail to respect basic political rights and civil liberties, undermine the independence of Electoral Commissions, unduly restrict ballot access for parties or candidates, repress opposition forces, limit fair and balanced access to campaign funding resources, disenfranchise citizens, coerce and intimidate voters, buy votes, manipulate election rules, limit balanced campaign news, generate fraudulent ballot counts, and prevent the legitimate victors from taking office.

Many regimes now hold elections but contests lacking integrity can generate legal disputes, reduce public confidence in democracy, and, in extreme cases, trigger outright violence and conflict. 

You can now download one large PDF file listed at the bottom of this page containing all briefing materials, the workshop program, list of participants and all papers except for two.

A major new research study, The Electoral Integrity Project (www.electoralintegrityproject.com ), will also be launched at this workshop.

The workshop brings together an international network of more than fifty leading scholars and practitioners to discuss these issues in six panels.

Practical arrangements:

Papers accepted for the Workshop are requested to be emailed to Pippa Norris three weeks prior to the event, by 15th June 2012. Papers should ideally be around 8,000 words in length. These will be circulated to discussants and posted on the ECP website, www.IPSA-ECP.com, in advance of the event. All papers will be considered for subsequent publication and Electoral Studies has indicated interest in reviewing papers for a special issue of the journal. Paper-givers and discussants are requested to present their comments for no more than 15 minutes each, to maximize time for discussion and interaction. Buffet lunch and refreshments will be provided for all registered participants. An evening dinner will also be arranged for chairs, paper-givers, and discussants.

Details about any amendments to the final program, and the practical logistics will be confirmed closer to the date. You are recommended to consult the IPSA Congress for details about recommended hotels. http://www.ipsa.org/events/congress/madrid2012/congress-accommodations.

Papers with this symbol can be downloaded from the workshop papers page.

Program schedule (Last updated 18th June 2012)

Time

Sessions

Presentations

09.00-09.15

Classroom 234

Registration and coffee

09.15-09.30

Classroom 234

Welcome: Pippa Norris and Donley Studlar

09.30-11.00

PANEL 1

THE CONCEPT AND MEASUREMENT OF ELECTORAL INTEGRITY

 

Classroom 234 This panel aims to unpack the complex idea of electoral integrity into its component parts, to discuss the normative assumptions, and to consider how best to measure each dimension.

 

Chair: Pippa Norris

 

 

Harvard University and the University of Sydney  pippa_norris@Harvard.edu Bio link

 

Papers:

 

 

1.1 

What Kind of Animal is Electoral Integrity?

 

 

Jørgen Elklit

 

 

(Aarhus University) elklit@ps.au.dk   Bio Link

 

1.2 

Information and self-enforcing democracy: The role of international election observation

 

 

Susan Hyde and Nikolay Marinov

 

 

(Yale University) susan.hyde@yale.edu Bio Link 

 

1.3

Measuring the Quality of Election Administration

 

 

Gary Bland, Andrew Green, and Toby Moore 

 

 

(RTI International) gbland@rti.org Bio Link

 

1.4

Government Accommodation and Repression in Non-Democratic Elections

 

 

Tavishi Bhasin and Jennifer Gandhi  

 

 

(Kennesaw State University and Emory University) jgandh2@emory.edu Bio :Link

 

1.5

Are there global norms and universal standards of electoral integrity and malpractice? Comparing public and expert perceptions

 

 

Pippa Norris

 

 

(Harvard University and the University of Sydney) Pippa_Norris@Harvard.edu Bio Link

 

Discussant: Megan Reif

 

 

(University of Colorado, Denver) reifmegan@live.com  Bio link

11.00-11.30 

 

REFRESHMENT BREAK

11.30-1.00

PANEL 2

THE CAUSE OF ELECTORAL MALPRACTICES

 

Tutorial room 23E This panel aims to identify and analyze the causes of electoral malpractices through case-study, longitudinal, and cross-national evidence.

 

Chair: David Carroll 

 

 

(The Carter Center)  djcarro@emory.edu Bio link

 

Papers:

 

 

2.1 

Carrot or Stick? The Political Economies of Electoral Malpractice

 

 

Sarah Birch

 

 

(University of Essex) bircsi@essex.ac.uk Bio Link

 

2.2 

Mapping manipulation: Explaining the spatial dimension of electoral fraud

 

 

Skye Christensen

 

 

skyeschristensen@gmail.com 

 

2.3 

Still A Model Democracy? Electoral Administration and the Integrity of the Electoral Process in the Britain

 

 

Alistair Clark

 

 

(University of Newcastle) alistairclark33@hotmail.com

 

2.4 

Benchmarking Election Administration: The Response of Local Officials to the UK Electoral Commissions Performance Standards Scheme

 

 

Toby James

 

 

(Swansea University) t.s.james@swansea.ac.uk

 

2.5 

Assessing Electoral Fraud in New Democracies: Refining the Vocabulary

 

 

Chad Vickery and Erica Shein

 

 

International Foundation of Electoral Systems (IFES)  CVickery@ifes.org

 

Discussant:

Fredrik M. Sjoberg

 

 

(New York University) fms268@nyu.edu

11.30-1.00

OR PANEL 3

CHALLENGES OF ELECTORAL INTEGRITY IN AFRICA

 

Tutorial room 23G This panel aims to identify and analyze the challenges of electoral malpractices, especially problems of electoral violence, through case-study, longitudinal, and cross-national evidence in Africa.

 

Chair: Staffan Lindberg

 

 

(University of Florida) sil@ufl.edu

 

Papers:

 

 

3.1 

Equality and society as a panacea to post-election violence: A critical analysis of North Africa

 

 

Victor Ojakorotu

 

 

(Northwest University, Johannesburg) vojakoro@yahoo.com

 

3.2 

Making Democracy Safe: Managing Electoral Violence in Africa’s Democratic Transition

 

 

Nkwachukwu Orji

 

 

(University of Nigeria) nkwaorji@yahoo.com

 

Discussant:

Jørgen Elklit

 

 

(Aarhus University) elklit@ps.au.dk Bio link

01.00-2.00

Location Tbc

BUFFET LUNCH

 

 

 

02.00-3.00

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

 

Classroom 234 The Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security works to promote and protect the integrity of the electoral process, which is fundamental for sustainable democracy. The Commission will distill recommendations to governments, regional and international organizations on how to prioritize and implement principles and practices to enhance the integrity of electoral processes.
www.global-commission.org

 

 

Stephen J. Stedman

Professor Stedman serves as the Director for the Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security. He is Freeman Spogli Senior Fellow at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law and FSI, an affiliated faculty member at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, and professor of political science (by courtesy) at Stanford University.

 

 

(Stanford University) sstedman@stanford.edu

03.00-4.00

PANEL 4

THE IMPACT ON CITIZENS AND DEMOCRACY

 

Tutorial room 23E

This panel will consider the consequences of lack of electoral integrity for citizens and for democracy, such as for party competition, electoral disputes, political legitimacy, regime change, and the quality of democracy, drawing upon selected cases and cross-national comparisons for evidence.

 

Chair:

Susan Hyde

 

 

(Yale University) susan.hyde@yale.edu

 

Papers:

 

 

4.1

Clean elections, good governments? The consequences of electoral fraud for the quality of government.

 

 

Carolien Van Ham

 

 

(European University Institute/University of Twente) Carolien.VanHam@EUI.EU

 

4.2 

Perceptions of electoral integrity, efficacy, and support for democratic institutions in Latin America

 

 

Miguel Carreras and Yasemin Irepoglu

 

 

(University of Pittsburgh), carreras_miguel@hotmail.com

 

4.3

Corruption and turnout in the Portuguese regions

 

 

Daniel Stockemer and Patricia Calca

 

 

(University of Ottowa), d.stockemer@web.de, (University of Lisbon), patriciacalca@gmail.com

 

4.4 


Making Voters Count: Evidence from Field Experiments about the Efficacy of Domestic Election Observation

 

 

Fredrik M. Sjoberg (New York University) fms268@nyu.edu

 

Discussant: Lonna Atkeson <atkeson@unm.edu>

 

 

(University of New Mexico)  atkeson@unm.edu 

03.00-4.00

OR PANEL 5

CHALLENGES OF ELECTORAL MALPRACTICE IN ASIA

 

Tutorial room 23G This panel aims to identify and analyze the challenges of electoral malpractices in Asia, through case-study, longitudinal, and cross-national evidence in Africa.

 

Chair: Pippa Norris

 

 

(Harvard University) Pippa_Norris@Harvard.edu

 

Papers:

 

 

5.1 

Electoral Engineering and Hegemonic Party Resilience in Singapore

 

 

Netina Tan

 

 

(University of Toronto) netina.tan@utoronto.ca

 

5.2 

Capturing Politics: Political Corruption Scandals and Political Disaffection in Indonesia

 

 

Liana Rahmawati

 

 

(West Virginia University) lrahmawa@mix.wvu.edu

 

5.3

The Cycle of Electoral Manipulation

 

 

Andrew Ellis

 

 

(International IDEA, Asia-Pacific) A.Ellis@idea.int

 

Discussant:

Sarah Birch

 

 

(University of Essex) bircsi@essex.ac.uk

4.00-4.15

 

Refreshment break

4.15-6.00

PANEL 6

THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC POLICY

 

Classroom 234

Workshop participants are asked to select one of the following interactive workgroups. You are asked to brainstorm and recommend strategic ways to strengthen electoral integrity either by (group A) programming electoral support, (B) strengthening transparency through the media, or (C) considering the goals and impact of electoral observation. The facilitators are asked to engage all participants in the groups discussions.  In the final 15 minutes, after reassembling in plenary, the group rapporteur is asked to present 3-5 strategic recommendations arising from your discussions.

 

Chair:

Zachary Alpern

 

 

(International IDEA) Z.Alpern@idea.int

Group A: Improving Programming Electoral Support

Facilitator: Niall McCann (Senior Electoral Assistance Advisor Coordinator, UNDP, Joint EC-UNDP Task Force on Electoral Assistance) 

Classroom 234 


Group B: Strengthening transparency through the media and election watch NGOs

Facilitator: Susan Hyde (Yale University)

Tutorial Room 23E


Group C: Observation Goals and Impact: Bridging the gap between theory and practice

Facilitator: Tbc  

Tutorial Room 23G

Report back by work-groups  to the plenary

6.00-7.00

Staff and Faculty Cafeteria on the Medicine building

PUBLICATION PLANS, LAUNCH OF THE ELECTORAL INTEGRITY PROJECT, AND COCKTAIL RECEPTION

9.00pm

 

Dinner at a local restaurant is by invitation only for all paper-givers, chairs and discussants.

The location is Restaurant Casa Marta, C/Santa Clara, 10 Opera, Madrid 28013 restaurantecasamarta.com

Entrar

There are many tapas bars in the vicinity for those wanted to meet informally for snacks and drinks before dinner. Given the timing (of dinner in Spain), you are asked to make your own way from your hotel to meet at the restaurant.

IPSA Madrid Workshop
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