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This workshop is concluded. Presentations, abstracts, speaker bios, and notes are here.
IoT Security and Privacy Keynotes Workshop
Abstract
The 2015 Internet of Things (IoT) Security and Privacy Keynotes Workshop will interactively create a roadmap of security and privacy priorities for the IoT led by security, privacy, and IoT luminaries from a variety of disciplines. Keynote speeches will be interspersed with guided, public discussion to distill challenges and priorities for future development of IoT devices, services, and policies that preserve security and privacy.
Objective: To assemble diverse expertise to create a roadmap of security and privacy priorities for the Internet of Things from complementary perspectives.  

Organizing Committee


Workshop Schedule


Scope Secure protocols and trustworthy computing enable reliable, private, and secure operation of IoT-connected devices, but technology is only one dimension of the problem. Social aspects, management policies, research agenda, and legal considerations must also be considered. Resource constraints of many small devices present a challenge to both security and privacy in the IoT. Many professionals are interested in addressing these challenges, but tangible progress is still limited. Many voices advocate privacy and security, but little practical research appears to have been done in processes, guidelines, and frameworks that enable development to continue without increased risk of security and privacy complications. Our research has uncovered a very limited amount of empirical research resulting in useful frameworks for privacy or security that would work in the real world of industry, manufacturing and consumer products. Many well-intended security and privacy measures (particularly in the healthcare domain) interfere with workflow and increase risk of process failure. An informed and guided discussion of priorities and near-term actions will assist the larger science and engineering community to settle on practical directions for research and policy that go beyond the protocols and products available today. Particularly, we are interested in examining the state of the technology; assessing its impacts on security and privacy for business, governments, and individuals; and creating guidelines, designing processes, and establishing frameworks that developers can use to reduce the risks we envision from the explosive adoption of IoT. To meet this need our workshop at the IEEE World Forum will host invited speakers from academia, industry and government to present whitepapers to be discussed with all attendees. Attendees will identify and help prioritize security and privacy priorities for the IoT from the presentations and their own experience. The objective is to promote security and privacy by creating a roadmap of priorities for IoT developers for the next five years. Keynote speakers will present their white papers for a public dialogue on security and privacy of the IoT. The workshop will last one day, and rather than simply listening to the presentation of papers, workshop participants will be given ample opportunity to discuss each paper. During each discussion session, the facilitator will encourage all participants to note ideas for challenges and priorities for security and privacy. Under the guidance of a facilitator, attendees and keynote speakers will together identify key challenges for IoT security and privacy research in the coming years. Finally, the entire group will prioritize the challenges into a recommended roadmap for security and privacy for IoT research and development over the next five years.
Intended Audience Since IoT and the disciplines of security and privacy are cross-cutting, we expect broad interest in this topic. Researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in fields related to security and privacy and IoT will find the symposium most interesting. Integration of the cyber and physical worlds represents the driving motif, and consequently those interested in security and privacy aspects of cloud computing, ubiquitous sensing, crowdsourcing, and mobility will also be interested.