About

What is Intensity Analysis?

Intensity Analysis is a quantitative method to analyze maps of land categories from several points in time for a single site by considering cross-tabulation matrices, where one matrix summarizes the change in each time interval. We called it “Intensity Analysis” because the method accounts for the intensity of land transitions while answering the following three interrelated questions through examining the degree to which changes are non-uniform at three levels: interval, category, and transition.

  1. In which time intervals is the annual rate of overall change relatively slow versus fast as revealed by our interval intensity analysis? 
  2. Given the answer to question 1, which land categories are relatively dormant versus active in a given time interval as revealed by our category intensity analysis, and is this pattern stable across time intervals? 
  3. Given the answers to questions 1 and 2, which transitions are intensively avoided versus targeted by a given land category in a given time interval as revealed by our transition intensity analysis, and is this pattern stable across time intervals? 

Go to this page to read more about the method. Also you can download for free a computer program to perform the analysis from this page



What is the unique contribution of the Intensity Analysis?

The unique contribution of the Intensity Analysis is that it combines all three levels of analysis into one unified framework, where the more detailed levels are conditional on the less detailed levels. This integration improves the ability of scientists to characterize patterns of change appropriately at different levels of details and over several time intervals in order to generate a research agenda to find the processes and causes of change.

Go to this page to read more about the Intensity Analysis.



How much error can explain non-uniform results from Intensity Analysis?

We offer you a method to compute the size and nature of hypothesized errors in the data that can explain non-uniform differences in the data. Our method tests a uniform hypothesis that assumes the real changes are uniform; in which case some amount of hypothesized error in the data would explain the non-uniform differences. Larger hypothesized errors give stronger evidence against the uniform hypothesis.

Go to this page to read more about the method. Also you can download for free a computer program to perform the analysis from this page



Can we use the Intensity Analysis with large number of categories?

Yes, we can. The Intensity Analysis works for any number of categories. However if maps have very fine categorical scale, meaning a large number of categories, then the analysis can become difficult to interpret. Category aggregation can simplify the interpretation, but can also have an influence on the measurement of land transitions. We have developed an algorithm to combine land categories in a sequence of aggregations that maintains the largest possible sum of all land transitions.

Go to this page to read more  about this algorithm.  Also you can download for free a computer program to perform the analysis with your own data from this page

Comments