The Flow of Observers Postulate


Defintion - "Looking Inward to a cfp" / "Looking Outward to a pvs"

Looking "inward":
  • When an insider examines a proper insider, we say the observer is "looking inward to a cfp".
  • When an outsider examines an insider, we say the observer is "looking inward to a cfp".
  • When an external outsider examines an outsider, we say the observer is "looking inward to a cfp".
In contrast, looking "outward":
  • When an proper insider examines an insider, we say the observer is "looking outward to a pvs".
  • When an insider examines an outsider, we say the observer is "looking outward to a pvs".
  • When an outsider examines an external outsider, we say the observer is "looking outward to a pvs".


-->  #2 - "The Flow of Observers Postulate"

  • --> #2A - Anybody looking inward to a cfp witnesses reality as if it were Einsteinean.
    That means, looking inward, the speed of light will always be awitnessed as natural.
  • --> #2B - Anybody looking outward to a pvs witnesses reality as if it were Galilean.
    That means, looking outward, the speed of light is not natural (unless trivially).

    When one is at rest with pvs everything is Galilean. There does not exist any masses/particles/forces/etc in pvs, but nonetheless, the laws of physics in that space is Galilean and all Lorentz factors are equivalent to one. Thus, without morph effects everything becomes Galielan.  When one introduces "stuff", masses/particles/forces/etc, then the space becomes Einsteinian.


Remarks

  • When one is looking "outward" we say the derived equations are "outward bound".
    An equation that is outward bound is identified by a "(+)" preceding the equation.
  • When one is looking "inward" we say the derived equations are "inward bound".
    An equation that is inward bound is identified by a "(-)" preceding the equation.
  • An equation that always satisfies as being outward bound and inward bound is said to be "wayward".
    An equation that is wayward is identified by a "(±)" preceding the equation.

    The ameasured and aderived quantities can and do differ depending on whether one is using outward equations or inward equations.  If a quantity is ameasured and aderived to be the same in all outward and inward equations, then we say the quantity is wayward.

    Note that one can never observe an external outsider!  Rather, one must become an external outsider and look inward towards others.

    Also notice that both escape Lorentz velocities ve and captured Lorentz velocities vc are all inward bound.  Thus, any equation that has a Lorentz factor must also be inward bound.


Examples

>(1)       (+) dFP = mm*a
>(2)       (
±) v = a*t
>(3)       (-) 
dF = dm*a
  • Equation (1) is outward bound (Galilean).
    We use equation (1) when we are close to cfp looking outward to pvs.

  • Equation (2) is wayward.
    We use equation (2) in either circumstances, whether we are close to pvs or close to cfp.
  • Equation (3) is inward bound (Einsteinian).
    We use equation (3) when we are close to pvs looking inward to cfp.
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