Abstracts & Full Papers

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Five papers from the conference -- listed alphabetically by first author -- are available for download at the bottom of this page. Papers are in .PDF format. Here are the abstracts for each:



Bossaller, J., & Adkins, D. (2016). Documenting and sharing managerial wisdom.

Librarians manage information. How well do they manage their institutional knowledge, though? Knowledge management (KM) is a concept that is derived from business, though it has been found to be useful, and has been widely applied, in non-profit parlance and even librarianship. We frame the problem of library leadership transition within a KM context, focusing on public library management. A survey of libraries in Missouri (United States) reveals the current state of practice for library leadership transition in light of one KM framework. The results of this paper inform both our current knowledge of succession planning for Missouri libraries and the gaps that currently exist between the informal transfer of knowledge and a structured KM system. Finally, we discuss the Public Library Leadership program, designed to introduce LIS students to public library administration through a combination of educational and experiential learning opportunities, and we explore how the literature and the study might inform education for new public librarians, especially directors of small public libraries.



Charbonneau, D. H., Priehs, M., & Hukill, G. (2016). Beyond knowledge silos: Preserving and sharing institutional knowledge in academic libraries.

Many academic environments tend to store information in “knowledge silos,” which are unproductive ways that compartmentalize knowledge and prohibit the sharing of ideas (Robson et al., 2003, p. 1). Preserving institutional knowledge is imperative for moving beyond these knowledge silos in order to effectively document the collective expertise and history of an organization. Institutional knowledge encompasses a vast array of areas ranging from tacit knowledge (i.e. expertise), implicit knowledge, explicit knowledge, to procedural knowledge (IFLA, KM Section, 2015). While the importance of retaining institutional knowledge has been recognized, best practices for preserving and sharing institutional knowledge in academic libraries warrant further investigation. In this paper, a number of promising strategies for engaging in knowledge-retention activities in academic libraries to help facilitate the preservation of institutional knowledge are addressed. First, the advantages and challenges associated with preserving and sharing institutional knowledge in academic libraries are discussed. Second, a number of concrete examples of initiatives undertaken at one large academic library system in an effort to retain and transfer institutional knowledge are shared. Third, a discussion of knowledge-retention efforts to help identify effective and promising strategies for academic libraries is proposed. Finally, the authors are uniquely situated within a University with an accredited School of Library and Information Science (LIS). As such, innovative ideas for how Schools of LIS can cultivate a culture of information professionals prepared to lead and implement best practices for preserving institutional knowledge are also highlighted. By engaging in a discussion about promising practices for retaining institutional knowledge in academic libraries, this paper aims to serve as a platform to generate ideas and identify best practices that other information professionals may apply at their own institutions.



English, B. (2016). Experts explain: Connecting global experts in uncertain times.

Since 2014, FMC Technologies has been conducting a series of internal webinars titled "Experts Explain".  The purpose of the program is to capture the knowledge of our subject matter experts through a facilitated session where the SME delivers a 20 minute overview of their area expertise, providing insight into their role in the organization, and taking questions from the attendees.  Each session is recorded and posted on the corporate wiki, where viewership increases 4-5 fold.  Additionally, discussions are opened in our internal communities of practice where the experts can engage outside of the session and continue to answer questions. While initially focusing on the engineering and technical fields (approximately 4,000 employees globally), speakers have been expanding to include other parts of the organization including talent management, intellectual property, and senior leadership.  It has proved to be a fantastic avenue to highlight often “niche” experts in our company and connect individuals who would otherwise find it very difficult to connect. The Experts Explain series has been a standout example in our knowledge management group.  So much so, it has inspired a similar internal webinar series named “GradTalks” wherein new university graduates in the engineering rotational program get to hear from other program members from all over the world. The program truly embraces all aspects of knowledge management and is making a true impact in the company. Our best practices include:
How to structure a consistent, repeatable facilitated knowledge sharing event online
Recruiting internal experts with knowledge of interest to the organization
Capturing and sharing the content internally after event completion
Encouraging continued discussion through communities of practice



Ma, L. F. H., & Wong, M. M. K. (2016). From local to global: A comparison of Hong Kong Library Association Mentoring Programme and International Librarians Network.

In today’s world, sharing and connecting get easier every day with the rapid development of and ubiquitous access to the World Wide Web. It enables one to acquire information about their profession and connect with people any time any where. While celebrating this wide availability of information and connectivity, one-to-one personal sharing is not to be dismissed. Instead, we should make the best use of it in developing our profession. Both the Hong Kong Library Association Mentoring Programme and the International Librarians Network are newly launched mentoring programmes addressing the increasing demand for connecting and networking LIS professionals both locally and globally. This paper aims to compare these two mentoring programmes in terms of the successful factors of and learning support given to the Hong Kong LIS community, as well as the effectiveness of these personal sharing platforms. Their strengths, similarities, and impact to the LIS community will be discussed.



Neshat, N., Mirhosseini, Z., & Zahedi, Z. (2016). Becoming a learning organization: A case study of the National Library and Archive of Iran.

The research explores if NLAI (National Library and Archives of Iran) has provided the proper condition to attain the goals of becoming a learning organization and build leadership from within; as well as the extent to which it is ready regarding staff's viewpoints for capturing the organizational knowledge and making it available for reuse. The survey method is employed using an organized questionnaire based on Wick & Leon Model with 5 factors: Leadership, Assessment Program, information, Innovation, Implementation. Validity of the tool is measured through consulting some experts in knowledge and information science and management fields. Also, the Cronbach's Alpha 97% confirms the Reliability of the tool. The population consists of all staff holding a BS degree and having 10 years work experience whom were 326 staff. Among them 213 staff completed the questionnaire. Data analysis is done using one-sample t-test, independent samples t-test and ANOVA. NLAI readiness to become a learning organization evaluated significantly high regarding vision based leadership. Whereas, having a written policy or vision reflecting organization's goals and staff awareness of their manager's vision were evaluated low with mean rates of 3.9 and 3.15 respectively. Considering assessment program, irrational expectations from people work's outcome got mean rank of 3.62 and existence of a written and clear plan for attaining organization's goals, mission and vision got 3.32. Regarding information reception and dissemination, staff tendency to improve and update their scientific knowledge was the highest with 3.63 mean rank and information flow without paperwork and bureaucratic restrictions was the lowest. Innovation and creativity has been evaluated to be low and all the items related to this category had a mean rank below 3. Also, staff evaluation of organization administration and implementation, was in an average level. Overall, NLAI is in a middle range of readiness to become a learning organization. The components of vision based leadership had the highest and innovation and creativity had the lowest point of achievement respectively. Therefore, the administration needs to consider more toward innovation and creativity and also implementation in NLAI. However, other components have not been fully accomplished yet.

Here is a video of Z. Mirhosseini presenting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZaaTDDqW0s&feature=youtu.be.



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Spencer Acadia,
Oct 21, 2016, 7:47 AM
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Spencer Acadia,
Oct 21, 2016, 7:47 AM
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Spencer Acadia,
Oct 21, 2016, 7:47 AM
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Spencer Acadia,
Oct 21, 2016, 7:47 AM
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Spencer Acadia,
Oct 21, 2016, 7:47 AM