2009 Conference

Indian Association for the Study of Australia (IASA), Eastern Region
 International Conference
Kolkata
22 -23 January 2009

Conference Venue: Astor Hotel


LANDSCAPES AND RIVERS: SYMBOLISING CULTURAL LINKAGES BETWEEN AUSTRALIA AND INDIA

Conference organized in collaboration with AIC and UNSW

 


 

Conference Themes & Abstract Submission

Registraton

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Location Map

The past decade has witnessed a steady increase in mutual awareness between Australia and India.  For much of the twentieth century, the White Australia Policy considerably distanced the Indian Government from Australia and generated a sense of distrust, while after the Second World War, Australia’s gradual alignment with the US, especially during the Cold War period, and India’s alignment with the Soviet bloc and with China (prior to 1962), naturally alienated the two countries.  However, since the early 1990s, and in particular following the ending of the Cold War and the liberalisation of the Indian economy, Australia and India have developed important cultural, strategic and economic relationships.

 

The Australian Prime Minister led a trade mission to India early in 2006, Austrade has initiated a three-year marketing and promotions programme, Utsav Australia, to raise awareness of Australian business and industry among the Indian business community, and the Australian Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade has been conducting an inquiry into ‘Australia’s Relationship with India as an Emerging World Power’.  The development of strategic and, particularly, economic links between India and Australia has led to an increase in cultural exchange, formally through bodies such as the Australia-India Council, and there is a growing recognition of a shared British imperial past, together with a common concern to look forward to a meaningful future.

 

Australian Studies has therefore emerged as a significant discipline in major universities in India. There are some identifiable Centres for Australian Studies in different colleges and universities. This growing awareness is visibly apparent in the publication of a large number of books and journals every year.