Data
Subpages : Observations

 

Summary

 

Quantitative:

 

 

 

 

Graph 1 shows the average height each day of Holland Hybrid tomato plants grown in a   hydroponic system grew to a greater elevation than that of the plants grown in   soil.  From the beginning, the plants in the hydroponic system averaged taller than the soil plants.  For the first six days, both sets were close in height, but around the eighth day, the hydroponic plants began to grow at a faster rate than the soil plants, quickly surpassing them and doubling in height.  The soil plants seemed always to be a week behind the hydroponic plants for much of the experimental period.  However, as in seen occasionally in the hydroponic plants, the plants would have a growth spurt then would fall and become stems and branches.  The plants grown in soil also had a wide range of heights,

while the plants grown in the hydroponic system maintained a steady and consistently similar measure.  Therefore, the hydroponic system produced a more consistent way of growing tomato plants than growing in soil.

 

 

 

 

The plants grown using the hydroponic system grew with a very small variance in change among the trials as shown in Graph 2.  Unlike the tomato plants grown in soil, as shown in Graph 3 (below), the plants grown in the hydroponic system maintained a constant growth pattern similar to each other.  Therefore, the hydroponic trials proved to be more consistent at keeping an average height of the plants that are growing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As shown in Graph 3, the plants that were grown in soil grew at a multitude of different paces.  Trials 4 and 6 were lost before the end of the experiment.  Some of the trials that seemed to be doing poorly sprang up the last few weeks of the experiment becoming the tallest of all of the soil trials.  Through this, the soil plants show to be less consistent in growth than the hydroponically grown plants.

  

 

 

The use of hydroponically given fertilizer helped the tomato plants to grow quicker enabling them to produce leaves at a faster rate than that of plants grown in soil, as shown in Graph 4.  The constant flow of nutrients to the plant allowed for a greater growth in the leaves.  Therefore, this graph follows the hypothesis of hydroponic growing faster and healthier than the plants in soil.

 

  

 

Throughout the experiment, the plants grown in the hydroponic system had a greater circumference than the plants grown in soil, as Graph 5 shows.  The average of the circumference of all trials for hydroponics was almost always greater than that of the soil grown plants.  This graph shows the hydroponic plants grew to a greater circumference faster than the soil plants. 

 

 

Qualitative:

  

 

 

 

The plants grown in the hydroponic system had an overall greater and steady health than the plants grown in soil.  While the plants in soil varied in health, the plants in the hydroponic system maintained the same constant health of 6 through much of the experimental period. 

 


 

 



 



Subpages (1): Observations