Spaghetti with Seafood Marinara

3 cups Basic Tomato Sauce

1 pound spaghetti

Kosher salt

1/3 pound jumbo shrimp (16/20 count), peeled and deveined

¼ pound bay scallops

¼ pound squid rings

Freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons Shrimp Butter

4 cloves garlic, minced

½ pound small clams

¼ pound mussels

Generous pinch red chile flakes

1/8 pound lump Dungeness crabmeat, picked over

2 tablespoons minced Italian parsley

Grated Parmegiano-Reggiano, for serving, optional

 

Bring the tomato sauce to a simmer and keep warm. Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling, salted water according to the package directions.


Meanwhile, season the shrimp, scallops, and squid with salt and pepper. Heat a large, heavy pot over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the butter and let melt. Add the shrimp and a quarter of the garlic and sauté for about 1 minute, or until almost cooked through. Remove the shrimp to a plate. Add the scallops and another quarter of the garlic to the pot and sauté for about 1 minute, or until almost cooked through. Remove the scallops to the plate with the shrimp. Add the squid and another quarter of the garlic to the pot and sauté for about 30 seconds, or until almost cooked through. Remove the squid to the plate with the shrimp and scallops. Add the clams and mussels and the remaining quarter of the garlic to the pot and sauté for about 1 minute. Add the tomato sauce and red chile flakes and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the clams and mussels begin to open. Return the shrimp, scallops, and squid to the pot and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the seafood is just cooked through. Remove from the heat, stir in the crabmeat and parsley, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Drain the pasta when it is al dente. Add the pasta to the sauce and toss to coat. Arrange on individual plates, top with plenty of Parmegiano, if desired, and serve immediately.


Makes 5 to 6 servings. Seafood must be impeccably fresh, especially mussels and clams. Purchase live mussels and clams the day you intend to cook them. When you bring them home, the shells may be open, especially if they’ve been stored on ice. Tap them gently and see that they close; discard any that do not close. To prepare them, scrub with a stiff-bristled brush and de-beard the mussels. Discard any mussels or clams that do not open once cooked. If desired, add a couple of tablespoons of white wine to the pot along with the clams and mussels.

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