Get Involved 2015

There are exiting ways to get involved in the Human Habitat Project this coming year!

I'm gearing the agenda toward providing a CUTTING EDGE BIOREGIONAL EDUCATION EXPERIENCE, through foraging, ancestral skills immersion, permaculture, food forestry, resource stewardship, travel, exposure to congruent communities, and connecting with intriguing individuals.

After all, my own desire to continually learn and explore was the impetus for the project. A satisfying education involves more than books and tests. The education we all want is an adventurous path to leading a rich life. The Human Habitat Project is about pursuing nature's 'good life'. This journey is made of intimate connections with life's great variety, finding lifelong friends and mentors, exploring the land, learning from the land's cultures, giving to the greater community, and finding your niche.

The agenda below outlines activities planned for the year, at the project site, and across the broader bioregion. If you'd like participate, or have ideas for integrating your own plans, please get in touch (practicalnaturalist@gmail.com).

How to Jump In:

Intensive Learning:

Attend focused personalized courses to learn new skills, such as basketry, hide tanning, or bow making. OR enroll for immersion in the seasonal round, for an extended period, gaining proficiency in living skills such as foraging, plant propagation, and primitive construction. Different learning pathways are possible to accommodate particular interests. A possible pathway is creating a full set of stone age clothing and gear. Intensive learners participate as a member of the primitive community, helping with the foraged portion of meals and other daily subsistence activities. See the detailed agenda below for planned activities, including courses, foraging forays, field trips, gatherings, and primitive walkabouts. Classes will be led by Kyle Chamberlain and guest instructors. Tuition is on a per course basis, or $100 per week, which covers primitive boarding.


Intern (see also internship page):

Join the Human Habitat Project team for a total immersion experience. Develop the skills of a self-sufficient forager/tender, and participate in community subsistence. Option to create your own primitive household on the project site. Get support finding your own "original affluence" lifestyle. Help plan and execute project activities. Develop project facilities. Collaborate on green income opportunities.


Can't take a class? There are other ways to SUPPORT THE PROJECT, in this pivotal first year of the education program. You can help the program meet it's financial baseline and get off the ground:


-Commission Crafts

-Reserve Wild Food

-Steward Bioregional Plant Resources

-Grow Special Trees in the Edible Arboretum

-Sponsor Learning

-Support Field Excursions

-Benefit the Land Trust

-Benefit Research and Publications

-Share Your Project


PHOTO GALLERY OF HUMAN HABITAT PROJECT SITE

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Agenda 2015


Formal Classes

(these are generally weekend classes, scheduling still tentative, so contact if interested)

-two week hide tanning and clothing intensive (April or May)

-cedar and birch bark bark basketry

-bow and arrows

-flint knapping intensive

-pack baskets

-seasonal foraging intensives

-stone age woodworking and construction

-tule mats, tule boats, cattail and tulee craft

-stone carving

-core curriculum (for the museums, the park service, and others)


Core Curriculum
All Intensive Learners will leave proficient at the following:

-bowdrill and handdrill friction fire

-expedient and refined stone blades, projectile points, and other stone tools

-simple basketry

-primitive footwear (sandals or moccasins)

-at least one primitive weapon (quicky bow, atlatl, sling)

-foraging for 100+ for staple plant foods

-expedient shelter construction and sleeping out sans sleeping bag

-primitive traps and snares

-coal roasting, pit cooking, stone boiling, and other primitive cooking methods

-skinning and butchering

-drying plant foods, drying jerky, and rendering fat

-pitch hafting

-cordage from major native fiber plants

-how to use a felling axe and crosscut saw

-working knowledge of the major cold climate food plant taxa, and how to propagate them

-how to identify and steward excellent human habitat


Year Plan

(seasonal activities, field trips, gatherings, ext.)


JANUARY:

-steam bake tree lichen, seek spawning suckers


FEBUARY:

- tap birches and maples, wild carrots

-cuttings for planting (poplars, grapes, currants, ext.)


MARCH:

-Columbia Basin biscuitroots and other roots

-Glass Buttes Knap In

-spring planting/transplanting, early sowing

-TREE PLANTING!!!! At the Habitat and with Feral Friends


APRIL:

-native seeds and wildcrafting with Northwest permaculture hero Michael "Skeeter" Pilarski (dates tentative).

-Permaculture and wild food at Columbia Basin Permaculture, with WSU ag science people.

-Scab Land Roots

-peel bark for baskets, roofing, fiber, and other crafts (cedar, spruce, birch, willow, ext.)


MAY:


-gorilla food (shoots and greens)


-late sowing


-Between the Rivers (May 26th-30th) Committed. My intensive students promised a discount.

-Morel mushrooms


JUNE:

- dry nettles, golden currants, serviceberry cakes, wild sweet cherries, ground squirrel hunting

-begin seed collection


JULY:

-Hells Canyon apricots, mulberries, cherries, cous, yampah

-canoe foraging

-Black Sand Dunes warm water fishing

(In July we'll join forces with author Tom Elpel, and Green University interns. See the Botany and Foraging Intensive description on Tom's site.)

-cut poles for construction

-HELLS CANYON PHOTO GALLERY


AUGUST:

-smoke dry Pend Orielle huckleberries

-observe native salmon fishing

cherry plums, seek to, blackberries

-bud grafting


SEPTEMBER:
 -Idaho wild rice


-wild apple processing, chokecherry leather, early archery season for deer


-gather sumac leaves for tanning


-Saskatoon Circle


OCTOBER:

-Nevada/Idaho pine nuts

-Cascade Foothills Acorns

-hazelnuts, cattail starch,wild pears, hunting for grouse/bear/elk, render fat, make jerky

-cut tules for mats, baskets, hats, ext., collect hides from hunters, collect cider wastes for planting

-North Columbia Knap In (hosted by the project)


NOVEMBER

-Hells Canyon Walnuts

-fall biennials (carrots, thistles, primrose, ext.)

-gather dogbane and other fiber plants, layering of shoots, fall burning, firewood collection, pot seeds


DECEMBER

- trap line with Jim Gnapp (need passports, possibly permits), seek seafood, inquire about visiting Buffalo Bridge Bison Parts Project

-(Year round salvage of roadkill, by permit)

-willow withes for basketry, bow staves, arrow shafts, carving blanks, protect saplings


Foraging Missions (listed above)

We will strive to subsist on wild food, as much as possible, throughout the year. Time will be made daily for foraging, and organized field trips will be made to gather foods in bulk at prime times and locations. We will also preserve food for the winter and for stone age immersion experiences.


Materials Collection and Plant Propagation Missions (listed above)

(various seeds collected year round, see food forest list)

Other options, not seasonally dependent:

-Glass Buttes obsidian/dacite

-North Powder basalt

-Yellowstone area Obsidian?

-quarry serpentine for stone carving

-cedar and larch wood for split plank construction

-animal bones for implements and other experiments

-source nephrite...


Annual Gatherings to Attend (listed above)

(it may be possible to arrange to come as my assistant instructor)

Other options:

-NW Permacutlure Convergences

-Rabbitstick?

-Winter Count?

-Feral Futures?

- seek Activist Training


(foraging and tour destinations. click here enlarge)


Primitive Walkabouts

A "walkabout" is where we take a break from the opulent feral good life and test our skills in wilderness with little or no modern gear. Walkabouts can be minimalist experiments or purist experiences. We'll begin a tradition of a walkabout in every season, in diverse environments ranging from lowland desert to high mountains. Those who have taken preparatory classes are welcome on walkabout as independent friends, but there is no tuition for the walkabout . Portions of walkabouts may occur on public land. Each walkabout will be about a week long, or more, depending on interest. Walkabouts may involve other experienced forager friends and possibly pack animals.

-SPRING Desert Roots (Hells Canyon or Eastern Washington Scablands)

-SUMMER Forest Fruits (Northeast Washington Forest Lowlands)

-FALL- Mountain Meat (Northeast Washington Mountains)

-WINTER- Snowy Survival (Northeast Washington Mountains)

Impromptu primitive experiences will also be had at the project site and the places we visit.

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Ongoing Land Projects

-Edible Arboretum and Feral Food Forest development

-forest thinning and burning

-wild tending

-arboreal primate combat training

-deprogramming

Planned Land Projects

-small house construction (spring)

-primitive housing and facilities construction

-ponds, swales, and water development

-megafauna pasture development

-garden improvement

-rocket stoves and heaters

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Visits:
Permission to visit the listed places has not necessarily been established yet

-Feral Farm, with Matt, Rockport WA

-Bullock Brothers Permacutlure Homestead, Orcas Island, WA

-Columbia Basin Permaculture, with Bill and Shiela, Ritzville, WA

-Wilderbabe Paradise, with Katie and Bartle, Twisp WA

-Green University, with Tom and Kris, Pony, MT

-Hell's Canyon, with Cortni and Danny, Halfway, OR

-Green Wave Gardens (also a seed source), with Bruce and Shirely, Northport, WA

-Buffalo Bridges, with Katie, Gardener MT

-Voyages to Rediscovery, Traditional Boats, the Columbia River System

-Spokane Salish School

-Tolstoy Farms

-other ideas (such saw smithing) as yet undisclosed...

Nusery Field Trips (also interview about propagation)

-Mt. Vernon Research Station

-Gellatly Nut Orchard (get passports, transport permits)

-Burnt Ridge

-Raintree

-Lawyer

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Wild Plant Resource Missions:

some of many missions I've written about

-Sauk Creek oaks

-remarkable salisfy

-interior populations of coastal species: red alder, bigleaf maple, salal, salmonberry

-coastal species experiments: wild blueberries, big bush huckleberry, giant camas, wild fuki,

-Clarkston figs???

-Hells Canyon: mulberries, apricots, walnuts, cherries, ground cherries, parsnips

-Northern mountain mohagany

-Idaho wild rice

-earthnut pea

-purple salisfy

-lycopus uniflorus

-Sauvies Island wapato

Possible Plant Resource Missions Outside Region

-Great Basin Desert: Sheperdia argentea, Nothern pinyon pines, gambel x holly oaks, northern agaves, Cercis occidentalis, New Mexico Locust, hardy opuntia, hardy screwbean mesquite?,

-California: California black oak

-Northern Plains: burr oak, breadroot, ipomea,

-Great Lakes (northern persimmons, pecans, wood nettle, passiflora, lotus)

International Seed Sourcing:

-trebizond date

-northern pistachio

-caucasian alder

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Interviews to Attempt: (for research, publication, and personal education)

-Eugene S. Hunn (limits to forager population growth, alternatives to Pleistocene overkill theory, migrations and prehistoric frontiers, evidence of violence on the prehistoric Plateau)

-Ken Asmus of Oikos (seed selection, breeding stabe strains, plants for sandy soils, cold hardiness, plant physiology, international plant sourcing, researching novel taxa, keying chestnuts)

-Josh Donlan (potential for Pleistocene rewilding projects in the INW, mountain tapirs)

-Jack Nisbet (psychology and paradigm shifts, cultural diversity, historic ecology)

-Richard Manning (the ecological status of modern agriculture, economic and political possibilities for rewilding, the neolithic)

-Nancy Turner (cultural appropriation of plant knowledge, cultural differences in plant use, forager adaptations to novel plants, foraging the future, landscape burning)

-author of Indians, Fire, and the Land

-David Chance/ regional archeology authority (lithic sources, climate and cultural change, archeological gaps, are the rivers downcutting, motives for sedentism, ramifications of Pleistocene extinctions, motives for subsistence shifts)

-Eileen Pearkes (psychology and paradigm shifts, cultural diversity, historic ecology, the future of rivers, blending cultures)

-regional paleobotany authority (validity of the arcto-tertiary forest, species relevant to primates, differences between old and new world forests, species ID by petrified grain, climactic limits to possible plant taxa)

-regional paleontology authority

-Michael Pilarski (seed sources, tree needs, wildcrafting)

-Tom Elpel (escaping the job trap, the art of nothing)

-old world archeology/anthropology authority (motives for subsistence shifts, Ukraine tusk houses, psychology of innovation, contemporary non-human homonids, early paleoethnobotany of Eurasia, adaptations to megafauna)

-Tolstoy Farm Board/Cascadia Trust (forming land trusts)

-Stinixt Activists (indigenous sovereignty and activism, political strategies, land restoration, pit houses)

-SHAWL (reservation radiation)

-Moskowitz (wolves and wolf ecology in the NW)

-WDFW (endangered animal species in WA)

-elk habitat biologist

-forest/fire ecologist (soil dynamics of thinning versus burning, historic forests, nutrient dynamics of logging, community forestry, lichen fertilization)

-WA DNR (community forest program)

Research for later publications:

A few of many subjects I'm collecting sources for:

-free seed source map for list species

-distribution of ice age megafauna

-diet/ecology of megafauna

-early paleoethnobotany of cold climates and the old world


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