How To Use Nail Scissors

    nail scissors
  • Small scissors with curved blades for cutting the fingernails or toenails
  • A nail clipper (also called a nail trimmer or nailcutter) is a hand tool used to trim fingernails and toenails.
  • The structure of nail scissors is much more stable than that of skin scissors, which is necessary for them to be able to meet the demands placed on them. Nail scissors also have to be curved in order to follow the shape of the nail.
    how to
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.
  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations
how to use nail scissors
how to use nail scissors - Seki Edge
Seki Edge Acrylic Nail Scissors
Seki Edge Acrylic Nail Scissors
These twice-tempered stainless steel toenail scissors from Seki Edge make light work of trimming thick nails. A curved and serrated cutting blade firmly grasps the nail and allows easy contouring around hard-to-reach places such as ingrown toenails. Now, even individuals with shaky hand movements can groom with confidence. Part of an upscale, professional personal grooming line, Seki Edge combines centuries-old Japanese craftsmanship with modern technology to create high performance stainless steel tools. Works equally well on acrylic fingernails and thick toenails.

Lesson #8 - Tools (Optional)
Lesson #8 - Tools (Optional)
Expanding off of Lesson #3 from my Essential Guide to Lego Customizing, I wanted to talk more about the tools that can be used for customizing Lego, which are completely optional to use, but I personally recommend using them. The photo contains examples of such tools used, but there are more out there that aren't pictured. I have also added notes identifying them for you. Anyways... It isn't the tools that you have that make good customs. It is how you use them. You can't call yourself a photographer just because you have a camera. You can't call yourself an artist just because you have a paintbrush and some paint. Same logic applies here as well. Painting/Coloring There a lot of options here when it comes to coloring your parts. Paint - The obvious and popular choice. Paint is easy to use. When you shop for paint, look at the labels. Look for words like "quick bonding" and "plastic". You want the paint to remain on the plastic. Try not to get thick paint. You want nice and clean textures, almost as if you didn't paint at all. Good paint to use is model paint, vinyl dye, and some acrylic. Spraypaint - Same thing as above. Quick bonding and made for plastic, and nice and clean textures. Krylon Fusion is a popular choice and is what I use and comes in several colors. Markers - These can be used for last minute or just quick touch ups. From permanent markers to Vis a Vis pens to Sharpie markers, loads to choose from. And the great thing about markers is that they can be washed off in case you are just doing a temporary custom. Sharpies are the popular choice as they just look nice. And I will be the one to say this: despite what people say about using sharpies here in the community, there is nothing wrong with using them. I use them. I encourage their use. Misc - Crayons, colored pencils, food dye, nail polish. If it works for you and gets the job done, go for it, but there are better options. :P Cutting/Drilling/Sanding Sometimes you have to cut parts to make them look right. Like coloring, many ways to do it. I'm just going to go out and just recommend getting a Dremel tool. What exactly is a Dremel? Basically it is a drill, but you can switch the heads for other uses like sanding, grinding, and cutting. Works on plastic, wood, and metal. It is handy to have around. And they have drill bits that are perfect sizes for attaching Lego parts (like say if you want a torso with 4 arms). Exacto knifes and nail clippers are also useful for cutting parts as well. Scissors are good for cloth parts. Nail file and sandpaper for smoothing down parts, especially ones that you cut to get rid of rough edges. Gluing/Taping For when you need to connect two parts together that have no connection points. For glue, I think the obvious to use is super glue or a type of solvent. It bonds quickly and stays on very well. Wood glue and regular Elmers glue can be used, but they get way to messy, so stick with super glue. For tape, the only tape you should ever use is electrical tape. Like markers, they are a great way for adding minor details like sleeves or slings, but they can also used in large uses. Look up Shobrick and you will know what I'm talking about. Other than that, any other tape is useless. Misc. Have you ever found a printed Lego piece, and wanted to make use of it but couldn't because it has a design on it that isn't exactly what you're looking for? Well there are ways to remove it. And by ways, I only mean one way because it's the only way I recommend - Brasso. Brasso is a metal polish that can be used to remove print. Whether you want to remove a whole design to have a blank torso or just simply alter it (see my Tron figs as an example), it is a useful tool to have. It will not alter the color or plastic of the Lego piece, although it will remove the finish on it, making it go from shiny to dull. But who cares. If you want to remove certain parts of a torso/head design but want to keep the rest, cover what you want to keep with scotch tape and wipe away the rest. If you need advice on Brasso, I'm your guy. Rubber erasers can be used too, but it's more tasking. Also on that note, do not use anything like rubbing alcohol, nail polish remover, or anything with acidic properties. It will melt your Lego. Suppose you want to make a weapon or a headpiece/body wear but you can't cast parts. Well there is sculpey. It's a type of plastic clay, which some customizors use to make mostly headgear or add on to headgear. I never used it so I can't really give any advice on it, but there are those who do use it like Tin_7 and Amadgunslinger. Anyways, with that said and done, all these items are easy to find at your local Wal-Mart, Target, Home Depot, Lowes, Michalls, ACMoore, etc. Who knows, you might find more tools to use at the stores. Practice with them. Toy with them. Use with caution. Always have back up parts if you screw up.
Lesson #3 - Making Your Creations
Lesson #3 - Making Your Creations
With your plans already set, lets starting "building" those fantasies and dreams of yours that Lego will not fulfill. While you make minifigs, try to see how many you can make with what you have just on hand. Just use whatever parts that you have sitting in your bin. This mini challenge not only helps get you adjusted with the basics of Lego building (duh), but also helps build consistency. Because there will be a time when you just can't afford to restock your inventory and you have to rely on what you have left remaining. What other tools do you have? Scissors, knife, cutting utensils (please be careful when using these by the way)? Glue and tape? Paint? Markers, sharpies, pens? Nail polish (stuff works)? Brasso, eraser? Dremel tool, drill, sandpaper? There are so many tools for you to use. Now depending how how you want to customize, you can either go the purist route or be hardcore and use all those things above. What is a purist? It is basically someone who uses just Lego and nothing else. But there are certain levels to it. Here is my personal ranking of it: Purist - Lego and nothing else. Does not cut, glue, or paint Lego either. Purist Customizor - Customizor who will use custom accessories (BrickForge, BrickArms, etc) made for Lego. Does not cut, glue, or paint. Customizor - Person will use whatever. May or may not cut, glue, or paint Where do you fall under? My suggestion: If you really want to make the minifigs you want, you have got to go outside your comfort zone and think outside the box, because using just Lego will limit you. What's Out There Now there are certain minifigs you want to make, but you don't have the right piece! Well worry not, because there are plenty of places to acquire Lego and custom accessories for your minifigs. I will not link to them, but I will tell you who they are. You will have to search them online for yourself. You have to be acquainted with this stuff: BrickLink - Great place to find to find spare Lego parts. They have it all. BrickForge/BrickArms/BrickWarriors/Arealight/BrickTW - These are custom houses that sell various pieces. BrickForge makes an array of fantasy themed items as well as regular modern accessories. BrickArms makes military themed accessories like guns and helmets. BrickWarriors is a mish-mash of BF and BA and is also going their own route. Arealight specializes in Star Wars accessories and BrickTW is based on ancient, Chinese lore. There are other vendors out there, but these guys are the gateway drug. MMCB - He specializes in custom cloth accessories like capes and trenchcoats. Kaminoan/Roaglaan - These guys make custom decals, in case you are having trouble making your own. There are others who are good making them as well. Always keep your eyes open. The more you look into these guys, the more doors that open up for you to other customizors. There is also third party brick brands that you can use as well. Mega Bloks, Cobi, Sidan Toys (resold by Minifig.Cat on BrickLink), Sluban, Oxford, Stikfas, Minimates, Kubricks. They have what Lego doesn't. And then there are other toys like Warhammer and whatever you see in a toy aisle. Point is, there are so many things you can use. When being a customizor, you have to have an open mind. Making the Minifig Making a custom minifig is like any other art. I always make "concept" figs to give me an idea of what I want to make and how to work with it. Draw out your figs. Try different combinations. When you make that minifig, look at it and see how it can be improved. A work of art is never complete. I can understand that currently that is the best you can do (and I have had those moments myself), but remember things change in the future so always use new, fresh pieces and techniques to improve your current work! Next lesson is Immersing Yourself in The Community
how to use nail scissors