HOW TO MAKE FOLDED FABRIC FLOWERS

HOW TO MAKE FOLDED FABRIC FLOWERS
    flowers
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
  • A brightly colored and conspicuous example of such a part of a plant together with its stalk, typically used with others as a decoration or gift
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
  • The seed-bearing part of a plant, consisting of reproductive organs (stamens and carpels) that are typically surrounded by a brightly colored corolla (petals) and a green calyx (sepals)
  • The state or period in which a plant's flowers have developed and opened
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
    how to
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.
  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic
    folded
  • (of a piece of furniture or equipment) Be able to be bent or rearranged into a flatter or more compact shape, typically in order to make it easier to store or carry
  • (fold) an angular or rounded shape made by folding; "a fold in the napkin"; "a crease in his trousers"; "a plication on her blouse"; "a flexure of the colon"; "a bend of his elbow"
  • Bend (something flexible and relatively flat) over on itself so that one part of it covers another
  • (fold) bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"
  • Mix an ingredient gently with (another ingredient), esp. by lifting a mixture with a spoon so as to enclose it without stirring or beating
  • (fold) incorporate a food ingredient into a mixture by repeatedly turning it over without stirring or beating; "Fold the egg whites into the batter"
    fabric
  • artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
  • The body of a car or aircraft
  • framework: the underlying structure; "providing a factual framework for future research"; "it is part of the fabric of society"
  • A textile is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw wool fibres, linen, cotton, or other material on a spinning wheel to produce long strands.
  • Cloth, typically produced by weaving or knitting textile fibers
  • The walls, floor, and roof of a building
    make
  • Alter something so that it forms or constitutes (something else)
  • engage in; "make love, not war"; "make an effort"; "do research"; "do nothing"; "make revolution"
  • Form (something) by putting parts together or combining substances; construct; create
  • brand: a recognizable kind; "there's a new brand of hero in the movies now"; "what make of car is that?"
  • give certain properties to something; "get someone mad"; "She made us look silly"; "He made a fool of himself at the meeting"; "Don't make this into a big deal"; "This invention will make you a millionaire"; "Make yourself clear"
  • Compose, prepare, or draw up (something written or abstract)
how to make folded fabric flowers how to make folded fabric flowers - Fabric Flowers
Fabric Flowers (Twenty to Make)
Fabric Flowers (Twenty to Make)
Confirming the old adage that big things come in small packages, the compact volumes of this ongoing series offer crafters an easy outlet for their passions—be they for fiber arts, sugarcraft, polymer clay, glasswork, papercraft, or jewelry. Emphasizing the simple fun of crafts, each concise resource includes 20 fast-to-finish, easy-to-do projects that always focus on a single subject or theme.

Ideal for adorning homes, clothes, and other items, sewn flowers are featured in this collection of 20 step-by-step projects for beginning and experienced crafters alike. Each inspiring floral design can be fashioned into a brooch, sewn onto handbags, added to scarves, or fastened to hairbands and shoe buckles for a fashionable look from head to toe. Every finished project is accompanied by a single detailed photograph for easy visual reference.

ca. 1357-1370 - 'count Johann II von Katzenelnbogen (+1357)', Kloster Eberbach, Hattenheim, Eltville am Rhein, Hessen, Germany
ca. 1357-1370 - 'count Johann II von Katzenelnbogen (+1357)', Kloster Eberbach, Hattenheim, Eltville am Rhein, Hessen, Germany
This highlight of 14th century funeral art most probably portrays count Johann II of Katzenelnbogen, who died in 1357. In my opinion it was carved some years after his death, maybe around 1360. Count Johann's armour is depicted in high detail, which makes this tomb effigy a perfect research example for 14th century military dress. Johann II wears a high and globular bascinet with an aventail (or camail) with a leather lining at the upper edges, attached to the bascinet by a rope running through vervelles which are part of the helmet. His lifted "Klappvisier" probably has a rounded mouth instead of the slightly later "Hundsgugel"-visor (with a long pointed snout). There's no sign of carved breathing holes in it. His body defences comprise 1. a mail hauberk with long sleeves and skirt worn over 2. a gambeson (protective clothing of softer fabrics, stuffed with hair, other textiles etc., very efficient against sword blows) (can't be seen in the effigy). 3. The coat-of-plates, worn over the hauberk, is a garment which consists of metal plates riveted inside of two cloth layers, the rivets can be seen all over it (as well as on his thigh-defences protruding from under his genouilleres or knie cups, made of a similar material). Around the torso there are less rivets since his breast is protected by a bigger plate (which would become the early, seperately worn breastplate some ten years later). Johann's coat-of-plates is a coat-of-arms as well, since his arms are depicted on it instead of on a seperate surcoat. The edge of the skirt of his coat-of-plates ends in leave-like decorations. The edges of the short sleeves are decorated with heart-shapes, a motif that can also be seen on the edges of his thigh defences. Two flowers (rivets as well?) are worn on his shoulders, probably made from brass or plate. On his torso two crowns (stapled to his breast-plate) with two chains hanging from them are attached to his dagger and/or his great helm. Early hourglass-gauntlets protect his hands; note how beautifully the knuckles get their own shaped plates! The highly decorated hip-belt (fashionable from ca. 1350 to ca. 1430) is made from numerous brass or metal plaques. Leg defences are 1. mail chausses, 2. thigh defences of a material comparable to the coat-of-plates, 3. genouilleres strapped over them, made of cuir-bouilli, metal or brass, 4. greaves strapped over the shins, and 5. sollerets or sabatons made of numerous metal plates. Rowel spurs are worn on the instep. The arming sword is of the hand-and-a-half type with a flattened ogival pommel. Apparently its got its own belt folded around the scabbard, so it wasn't worn attached to the hip-belt (?). The dagger is a baselard (an H-shaped handle). Johann's great helm shows a mantle and crest, and would have only been worn at the tournament, not in battle. It remained a popular item in effigies as a chivalrous symbol. No inscription for this effigy has been preserved.
ca. 1357-1370 - 'count Johann II von Katzenelnbogen (+1357)', Kloster Eberbach, Hattenheim, Eltville am Rhein, Hessen, Germany
ca. 1357-1370 - 'count Johann II von Katzenelnbogen (+1357)', Kloster Eberbach, Hattenheim, Eltville am Rhein, Hessen, Germany
This highlight of 14th century funeral art most probably portrays count Johann II of Katzenelnbogen, who died in 1357. In my opinion it was carved some years after his death, maybe around 1360. Count Johann's armour is depicted in high detail, which makes this tomb effigy a perfect research example for 14th century military dress. Johann II wears a high and globular bascinet with an aventail (or camail) with a leather lining at the upper edges, attached to the bascinet by a rope running through vervelles which are part of the helmet. His lifted "Klappvisier" probably has a rounded mouth instead of the slightly later "Hundsgugel"-visor (with a long pointed snout). There's no sign of carved breathing holes in it. His body defences comprise 1. a mail hauberk with long sleeves and skirt worn over 2. a gambeson (protective clothing of softer fabrics, stuffed with hair, other textiles etc., very efficient against sword blows) (can't be seen in the effigy). 3. The coat-of-plates, worn over the hauberk, is a garment which consists of metal plates riveted inside of two cloth layers, the rivets can be seen all over it (as well as on his thigh-defences protruding from under his genouilleres or knie cups, made of a similar material). Around the torso there are less rivets since his breast is protected by a bigger plate (which would become the early, seperately worn breastplate some ten years later). Johann's coat-of-plates is a coat-of-arms as well, since his arms are depicted on it instead of on a seperate surcoat. The edge of the skirt of his coat-of-plates ends in leave-like decorations. The edges of the short sleeves are decorated with heart-shapes, a motif that can also be seen on the edges of his thigh defences. Two flowers are worn on his shoulders, probably made from brass or plate. On his torso two crowns (stapled to his breast-plate) with two chains hanging from them are attached to his dagger and/or his great helm. Early hourglass-gauntlets protect his hands; note how beautifully the knuckles get their own shaped plates! The highly decorated hip-belt (fashionable from ca. 1350 to ca. 1430) is made from numerous brass or metal plaques. Leg defences are 1. mail chausses, 2. thigh defences of a material comparable to the coat-of-plates, 3. genouilleres strapped over them, made of cuir-bouilli, metal or brass, 4. greaves strapped over the shins, and 5. sollerets or sabatons made of numerous metal plates. Rowel spurs are worn on the instep. The arming sword is of the hand-and-a-half type with a flattened ogival pommel. Apparently its got its own belt folded around the scabbard, so it wasn't worn attached to the hip-belt (?). The dagger is a baselard (an H-shaped handle). Johann's great helm shows a mantle and crest, and would have only been worn at the tournament, not in battle. It remained a popular item in effigies as a chivalrous symbol. No inscription for this effigy has been preserved.
how to make folded fabric flowers
Folded Fabric: Squares & More (Love to Quilt)
An attractive alternative to piecing traditional patterns! *Discover the fun of folding fabric pieces and make your quilts more visually interesting without adding complex cutting and piecing steps. *Enjoy 15 simple folding techniques, then apply these techniques in 11 fabulous quilt projects. A bonus section includes 5 more folding techniques for endless pattern possibilities. *Realistic, step-by-step illustrations make folding fabric a snap! Each project is complete with yardage, cutting, and sewing instructions. *To illustrate the abundant applications of folded fabric, a colorful gallery showcases photos of blocks and block combinations - all made using the various folding techniques in the book. AUTHORBIO: Joyce received a National Quilting Association grant to study the use of Native American designs by quilters. This study directly led to Joyce writing five books. She has now written over a dozen books and 70 articles on quilting subjects. Quilting appeals to Joyce for the aspects of encouraging creativity, playing with color combinations, learning new techniques, observing all the wonderful quilts made by quilters, and enjoying non-harmful sensory overload. REVIEW: Offers an alternative to traditional quilt piecing patterns, providing fifteen simple folding techniques applied to eleven quilt projects. - The Midwest Book Review

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