A Patient Faces Death: an Analyst Grieves presented by Judy L. Kantrowitz, Ph.D.

posted Oct 17, 2018, 10:17 AM by Cristy Jennings

Thursday, November 15, 2018
7:00-9:00 PM
7:00 Networking | 7:30 Presentation (1.5 CEUs)

Co-Sponsored and held at 
The Menninger Clinic
12301 S Main St, Houston, TX 77035

Non-member Registration Fee: $20
CEU Fees
Active Members & Students: Free
Friends and Non-members: $20

A patient in analysis as a young woman returns to treatment later in her life.
During the course of our work she learns she has a life-threatening illness. Her
fears and grief evoke a mourning process in me, her analyst, reviving earlier
losses and grief of my own. Thoughts of death and fears of future loss emerge
in both of us as I try to find ways of helping both her and myself appreciate the
time we have, however temporary that may be.

OBJECTIVES
1. To recognize what can be stirred in an analyst when one’s patient faces a life threatening illness.
2. To find ways of doing meaningful psychological work which simultaneously support a patient who is
facing death.
3. To understand how grieving can enable an appreciation of what we have despite its transience.

OBJECTIVES
1. To recognize what can be stirred in an analyst when one’s patient faces a life threatening illness.
2. To find ways of doing meaningful psychological work which simultaneously support a patient who is
facing death.
3. To understand how grieving can enable an appreciation of what we have despite its transience.
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)
through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to
provide continuing medical education for physicians.”

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.


Life as a Hound: Patients’ Use of Dogs as Objects of Identification, Projection, and Displacement by JoAnn Ponder, Ph.D.

posted Sep 13, 2018, 8:24 AM by Cristy Jennings   [ updated Sep 22, 2018, 10:30 PM ]

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
7:00-9:00 PM
7:00 Networking | 7:30 Presentation (1.5 CEUs)
The Lovett Center
900 Lovett Boulevard
Houston, TX 77006
Non-member Registration Fee: $20
CEU Fees
Active Members & Students: Free
Friends and Non-members: $20

This presentation will explore the significance of dog imagery that arises in an
adolescent or adult patient’s clinical material. The presentation will include a
review of the literature and two case examples, one from a psychotherapy and the
other from an analysis. We will consider the patient’s intrapsychic characteristics
to assess whether the imagery is adaptive or pathological, and discuss ways of
making use of the imagery in our interventions.

OBJECTIVES
1. Identify the most frequent significance of dog imagery in the patient’s clinical material.
2. Describe other possible significances and defenses indicated by dog imagery.
3. Describe 3 aspects of the patient’s psychic functioning to consider when dealing with the dog imagery.

JoAnn Ponder, PhD is a psychologist-psychoanalyst in private practice in Austin. She was trained in adult psychoanalysis
and child psychotherapy at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. She also completed postgraduate programs in
infant-parent mental health intervention, object relational family and couples therapy, and psychoanalytic writing. In addition
to serving on the faculty of CFPS, she served as a clinical supervisor at the Dell Medical Center psychiatric residency program in Austin. Over the years, JoAnn has presented papers on a variety of clinical and applied psychoanalytic topics at national and international conferences. In 2004, she was awarded the David A. Freedman Candidate Paper’s Prize by the Houston Psychoanalytic Society. Her publications include a co-edited book about women’s issues, book chapters about adoptive motherhood and the childhood loss of a parent, and journal articles about narcissism in psychoanalysis, collective trauma following the Tower shootings in Austin, and patients’ identifications and projections onto dogs. Now that JoAnn is an empty nester, she’s especially grateful for the companionship of her own little dogs, a dachshund, chihuahua, and pug. JoAnn’s pronouns are she, her, and hers.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.”

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Please go to Events Registration Page, to sign up.



Become a Member Today!

posted Aug 7, 2018, 11:47 AM by Cristy Jennings   [ updated Sep 13, 2018, 8:29 AM ]

Click to Join or Renew - OCTOBER 1, 2018 DEALINE - BEFORE INCREASE
Please contact: Ariela Alpert at info@houstonpsychoanalytic.org with any questions regarding membership.

Houston Psychoanalytic Society Benefits of Membership ACTIVE AND STUDENT MEMBERS • 1.5 hours of CEUs for monthly meetings • $75 for 3-hour ethics and diversity workshops • 2 Business meetings - dinner included • Opportunity to vote and hold office • Listing in online Membership Directory with contact information and specialty areas • Invitation to pop up socials and new member events • Participation in HPS listserve debuting Fall 2018 HPS FRIENDS • $20 for 1.5 hours of CEUs for monthly meetings • $100 for 3 hours ethics and diversity workshops • Listing in Membership Directory with contact information and specialty areas • Invitation to pop up socials and new member events

MEMBERSHIP FEES Active Membership $200 before October 1, 2018 - $220 after October 1, 2018
Friend Membership $100 before October 1, 2018 - $110 after October 1, 2018
$25 Student Membership

Narcissism and its Discontents Glen Gabbard, M.D. Holly Crisp, M.D.

posted Aug 7, 2018, 9:25 AM by Cristy Jennings   [ updated Aug 23, 2018, 7:01 AM ]

Presentation Co-Sponsored by The Jung Center
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
7:00 PM -9:00 PM
7:00 PM Networking | 7:30 PM Presentation 
The Jung Center - 5200 Montrose Blvd.
Houston, TX 77006
This event is free and open to the public.
CEU Fees (1.5 credit hours)
Members & Students: No Charge
Friends: $20 | Non-members: $40

Narcissism is one of the vaguest terms in psychoanalytic discourse. Does it mean that
people with this condition love themselves too much? Or does it mean that they are
incapable of love? Do they really want to be loved or just admired? There is also ambiguity
about when positive self-esteem turns into self-admiration that is pathological. Moreover,
research suggests that there are a number of subtypes of narcissistic personality disorder
that appear in different configurations. In this presentation we will discuss the pleomorphic
nature of pathological narcissism and outline strategies for treatment.

OBJECTIVES
1. To educate mental health professionals about the subtypes of narcissistic personality disorder.
2. To inform audience members about the relational components of narcissistic personality disorder
3. To illustrate treatment strategies with narcissistic patients

Presenters
Glen Gabbard, MD is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and Training and Supervising
Analyst in the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston. He is also in private practice in Houston. Dr. Gabbard has authored or edited 28 books, including Psychodynamic Psychiatry in Clinical Practice: 5th edition, an all-time best seller at American Psychiatric Publishing, Long-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: a Basic Text: 3rd edition, Gabbard’s Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, Textbook of Psychoanalysis, Love and Hate in the Analytic Setting, Psychiatry and the Cinema, and The Psychology of The Sopranos. His most recent book is Narcissism and Its Discontents: Diagnostic Dilemmas and Treatment Strategies with Narcissistic Patients, co-authored with Dr. Holly Crisp. He has also published over 350 scientific papers and book chapters. Previous positions include Brown Foundation Chair of Psychoanalysis and Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine from 2001-2011 and Director of the Menninger Hospital in Topeka, Kansas from 1989-1994. He also served as Director of the Topeka Institute for Psychoanalysis from 1996-2001. He has received many honors and awards, including the American Psychiatric Association/NIMH Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education in 2010 and the prestigious Mary Sigourney Award in 2000 for outstanding contributions to psychoanalysis. He was Joint Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis from 2001-2007, the first non-British analyst to hold that position, and served as President of the American College of Psychiatrists from 2006-2007. Dr. Gabbard’s textbooks have been translated into Italian, French, German, Portuguese, Korean, Japanese, Danish, Chinese, Greek, Romanian, and Spanish. He lectures throughout Europe, South America, and Australia, as well as the United States and Canada.

Holly Crisp, MD is in the private practice of psychoanalysis and psychiatry in Houston. She is on the faculty of the Center for
Psychoanalytic Studies and is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. Her new co-authored
book (with Glen O. Gabbard), Narcissism and its Discontents: Diagnostic Dilemmas and Treatment Strategies in Narcissistic
Patients, was published in April 2018. She previously co-authored Professionalism in Psychiatry and has also written papers
on narcissism, the education of psychiatric residents, development of psychotherapeutic and psychoanalytic identity, teaching boundaries and ethics, as well as boundary violations and mentalizing. She teaches psychodynamic psychotherapy in the Baylor residency program and courses at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.”

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.


August Film Series Thursdays - 7 PM - 9 PM - All showings will be held at The Jung Center, 5200 Montrose Blvd. Houston, TX 77006

posted Jul 10, 2018, 7:59 AM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Aug 7, 2018, 11:41 AM by Cristy Jennings ]



August 2, 2018
The Handmaids Tale (1990)
Anne Strain, LCSW

August 9, 2018
The Village (2004)
Pianist Rodney Waters

August 16, 2018
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)
Margaret Jordan, PhD

August 23, 2018
The Shape of Water (2017)
Diana Heritage, LCSW

The Unseen Spouse: Pitfalls and Possibilities for the Individual Therapist Presented by Carla Leone, PHD

posted Jun 21, 2018, 8:05 AM by Cristy Jennings   [ updated Jun 21, 2018, 8:07 AM ]

Monday, August 6, 2018
8:30-11:30 AM
8:00 Registration | 8:30 Presentation (3 CEUs) 

The Lovett Center
900 Lovett Blvd
Houston, TX 77006
(Free Parking and Complimentary Valet)

A CLINICAL INTENSIVE
Open to HPS Members Only through
July 6, then open to the public.
- - Limited to 25 Participants - -

Clinical Intensive Registration Fees
Early Bird Registration through July 20, 2018
Active/Friend Members $90 | Student Members $40
Non Members $110
Registration After July 20, 2018
Active/Friend Members $110 | Student Members $50
Non-members: $130
Individual therapists often hear a great deal about our patients’ spouses or partners, and naturally develop ideas and beliefs about that unseen other and the causes of any relationship difficulties the patient reports. Not uncommonly, therapists can lose touch with the fact that their impressions of an unseen spouse are constructions that have emerged from the transference/countertransference field, based on only partial or limited information—not veridical truths. The Monday clinical intensive will focus on Dr. Leone’s paper “The Unseen Spouse: Pitfalls and Possibilities for the Individual Therapist”, published in Psychoanalytic Dialogues which will be emailed to registrants.  Dr. Leone will begin by highlighting the basic tenets of her contemporary self psychological approach to individual and couples treatment. She will then summarize the major points of her paper and illustrate them using additional clinical examples including those applied by participants.
OBJECTIVES
1. Attendees will be able to describe the phenomenon in which individual therapists develop a strong view of their individual patient’s significant other and seemingly forget that their impressions are based only on information that has emerged from the transference/contertransference field.
2. Attendees will be able to list several factors that can contribute to the development of this problem and ways to avoid them.
3. Attendees will be able to describe at least three ways individual therapists can respond therapeutically to patients’ complaints about their significant other without slipping into the problematic pitfalls described.

 Carla Leone, Ph.D. is the director of a group private practice in a Chicago suburb and on the faculty of the Institute for Clinical Social Work in Chicago, where she co-teaches a course on Psychoanalytic Couples Therapy. She is an elected member of the governing council of the International Association of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology (IAPSP), chair and co-founder of that organization’s Couples Therapy Interest Group, and recently co-chaired the 2017 IAPSP annual conference. She is the author of several published papers on self-psychologically informed couples and family therapy and is currently working on a book on couples therapy to be published by Routledge, tentatively titled Rebuilding Connections, Repairing Ruptures:  A Self Psychological Couples Therapy Casebook.  She has presented nationally and internationally on these topics.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.”

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners/presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose. 

Psychodynamic Themes in the Treatment of Adults Who Were Adopted as Infants Presented by Richard Michael, PhD

posted Mar 19, 2018, 4:43 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 4:49 PM ]

Saturday, April 14, 2018
                                                                         
8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
8:30 Networking | 9:00 Presentation (3 CEUs)
The Council on Recovery - Houston
303 Jackson Hill St
Houston, TX 77007
CEU Fees
Active Members: $75
Friends: $100
Non-members: $125
Students: $25

This workshop will discuss some psychodynamic themes observed in adults who were adopted in infancy as these emerge over the course of psychodynamic and psychoanalytic treatment. Particular attention will be directed to issues of identity formation and  object relations as they emerge in the context of phantasies of birth parents and adoptive family relationships. There has not been a great deal of attention paid to the topic of adoption in the psychoanalytic literature, however we will review some relevant  contributions before discussing observations and themes in clinical case examples. 

OBJECTIVES
1. Describe themes observed in the separation/individuation struggles of adopted adolescents.
2. Describe some of  the special challenges encountered in the resolution of “family romance” phantasies for adopted children.
3. Describe how fantasies of birth parents can evolve and serve various psychological functions over the course of development.

Dr. Richard Michael is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies—Houston/Austin where he is also Chair of the Curriculum Committee. He holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Boston University and trained clinically at:  McLean Hospital, The Cambridge Hospital, and Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center, where he subsequently served on the supervisory faculty for 13 years and was on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. He began his psychoanalytic training at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute and graduated from the Houston-Galveston Psychoanalytic Institute. In his many years in the Boston area,  he held clinical, administrative and supervisory positions at a number of public and private inpatient and outpatient facilities,  including as: Clinical Director of the Newton-Wellesley-Weston Multi-Service Center, Clinical Supervisor of the Inpatient Adult & Adolescent Psychiatric Unit at New England Memorial Hospital, Stoneham, MA, and, subsequently, Director of Psychology, and Director of Outpatient Mental Health Services at that hospital. Prior to moving to Austin, Dr. Michael maintained a private practice in Newton, MA and for years consulted to the staffs of several residential programs for chronically mentally ill patients. He currently lives and maintains a private practice in Austin, providing psychoanalysis, individual, group and couple psychotherapy as well as clinical consultation and supervision.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.”
IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose. 



Do We Have Fantasies, Or Do They Have Us? Ethics and the Imagination in Psychotherapy

posted Feb 28, 2018, 2:46 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 4:48 PM ]

Presented by Sean Fitzpatrick, PhD,LPC
Collaborative Presentation with the Jung Center
Saturday, March 17, 2018
8:30 AM- 12:00 PM
8:30 Networking | 9:00 Presentation (3 CEUs)
The Jung Center
5200 Montrose Blvd.
Houston, TX 77006
CEU Fees
Active Members: $75  |  Friends: $100
Non-members: $125  |  Students: $25

Are there right and wrong ways to imagine, things we should or should not feel, think, desire? Our greatest innovations, works of art, acts of compassion emerge from the human imagination. As do our horrific atrocities. How we imagine matters. But the imagination is not a tool at our ready disposal, to direct as we will.
Therapists work in an intersubjective imaginal field. Jung suggested that, “Every psychic process is an image and an imagining.” Our imaginations fill with the experiences, conscious and unconscious, of our clients, and those experiences interact with our own in ways that are mysterious and as potentially destructive as they are potentially transformative--for them and for us. Our imaginings of our clients, our fantasies of and with them, come unbidden. Rather than attempting to ignore or control those fantasies, however, we can learn how to host them in ways that honor.

OBJECTIVES
1. To Illustrate the role of the imagination in psychotherapy.
2. Describe ethical models drawn from analytical psychology and the philosophy of  Emmanuel Levinas.
3. Describe cultural and philosophical models of the imagination.
4. Outline key techniques for hosting fantasy with an ethical attitude in the clinical setting.


Psychotic Symptoms, Mystical Experiences: Applying the Methodologies of St.Teresa of Avila to Contemporary Clinical Practices presented by Dr. Catherine Stevenson

posted Jan 19, 2018, 8:45 AM by Cristy Jennings   [ updated Jan 19, 2018, 2:29 PM by Houston Psychoanalytic Society ]

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
7:00-9:00 PM
7:00 Networking | 7:30 Presentation (1.5 CEUs) 
The Council on Recovery - Houston
303 Jackson Hill St
Houston, TX 77007
This event is free and open to the public. 
Free parking on the north side of the building.
CEU Fees
Members & Students: No Charge
Friends: $20 | Non-members: $40
This presentation considers how to evaluate the sometimes extraordinary experiences patients present. After first discussing what mystical experiences are from Eastern, Western, Freudian and Jungian perspectives, the presentation will explore how to differentiate mystical experience from psychosis.

OBJECTIVES
1. To create awareness of the mystical variations of experiences in clinical patients.
2. To explore how to differentiate mystical experience from psychosis.

Dr. Catherine Stevenson is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Houston, Texas.  She trained at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas, moving to Houston as part of the Menninger-Baylor College of Medicine merger to complete her residency. Psychoanalytic studies, begun at the Topeka Institute for Psychoanalysis, were completed at the Houston-Galveston Psychoanalytic Institute after the move. A former President of the Houston Psychoanalytic Society, Dr. Stevenson is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry at Baylor, where she teaches and supervises residents in psychotherapy, and a member of the faculty of the Center For Psychoanalytic Studies.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and The Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.”
IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose. 

To (Inadvertently) Catch a Predator: Mediating the Risks of Practicing Psychotherapy in the Digital Age Connie Ittner, LCSW, CGP Lauren Walther, LCSW, LCDC

posted Jan 8, 2018, 7:46 AM by CFPS Information

Wednesday, January 10, 2018
7:00-9:00 PM
7:00 Networking | 7:30 Presentation (1.5 CEUs)
The Council on Recovery - Houston
303 Jackson Hill St
Houston, TX 77007
This event is free and open to the public. 
Free parking on the north side of the building.
CEU Fees
Members & Students: No Charge
Friends: $20 | Non-members: $40 



Connie Ittner, LCSW, CGP, is a Social Worker in private practice in the Heights, Houston, Texas. Connie completed a post-graduate fellowship on the Professionals in Crisis Unit at The Menninger Clinic after earning her Masters of Social Work from The University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work in 2013. She is in the process of completing a two-year curriculum covering psychoanalytic theory and the technique of psychotherapy at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. Connie is a Certified Group Psychotherapist through the American Group Psychotherapy Association. 

Lauren Walther, LCSW, LCDC received her master’s in social work from Smith College in Northampton, MA in 2011. After graduation, she pursued further clinical training as a postgraduate social work fellow at the Menninger Clinic on the Professionals in Crisis Unit (PIC). In 2012, she became a licensed chemical dependency counselor to better serve the needs of clients with addictions issues. She joined the staff at Menninger upon completion of her fellowship in 2012. She worked as a staff social worker on the Professionals in Crisis Unit (2011-2013) and as an addictions counselor and staff social worker at the Pathfinder Program, the Menninger Clinic’s community integration program (2013-2017). She has also been working in a private practice since 2013.

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