Rationale for Institutional Purchase of the Hough Wood Specimen Collection

 Section I of Presentation prepared by Jon P. Speller

 I. Rationale for Institutional Purchase of the Hough Wood Specimen Collection


     Very rarely does a non-profit institution have the opportunity to acquire a scientific natural treasure that cannot be reproduced or economically replicated even with modern technological advancements. The HOUGH WOOD SPECIMEN COLLECTION, and its Special Auxiliary Hough Wood Specimen Collection, offered hereby are thus unique in that respect whether in the United States or globally.

     The qualified non-profit institution that acquires the HOUGH WOOD SPECIMEN COLLECTION will become a focus for many diverse institutions and researchers around the world as the sole repository ever of such a massive collection of scientific specimens ranging in age from 88 years to over 120 years, with use of the vast Collection in numerous ways, ranging from the scientific to the artistic. Hough wood sections have been utilized, for example, by the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in its 2006 Plant Histology Workshop, and by the Yale University Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library's  "Trees in Fact and Fable" Exhibition with Hough wood specimens "as the culmination" of that 2007 crowd attracting exhibit. DNA related research on woods, still in its early stages, will certainly evolve utilizing the specimens of the Collection and bring vast potential associations and acclaim to the institution acquiring the Collection. A distinguished scholar friend of mine has also pointed out that the Hough Wood Specimen Collection can "awaken the intellectual minds of citizens that behold the works of our Creator as beauty, and the institution that becomes the sole repository of such a massive collection of scientific specimens will be able to make use of the vast Collection in numerous ways, ranging from the scientific to the artistic...The age of the Hough wood specimens will help provide a basis to prove the need for reforestation and the effects of climate change, indicating multitudinous possibilities for the process of restocking with diverse native tree stock existing forests and woodlands that have been depleted. The process of restoring and re-creating areas of woodlands or forest that once existed but were deforested or otherwise removed or destroyed at some point in the past can be spurred with the help of this vast wood specimen Collection. The resulting forest in each application can provide both ecosystem and resource benefits and have the potential to become a major carbon sink. A carbon dioxide (CO2) sink is a carbon dioxide reservoir that is increasing in size, and is the opposite of a carbon dioxide 'source'. The main natural sinks are (1) the oceans and (2) plants and other organisms that use photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere by incorporating it into biomass and release oxygen into the atmosphere. Thus the Hough Wood Specimen Collection can become an important element in helping to refine sustainable research and educational projects worldwide with reforestation and climate change factors becoming a significant potential extension of the already historical work of the Hough Wood Specimen Collection."

  It is important to note if more than a thousand institutions around the world possess one each of the Romeyn Beck Hough wood specimens in either the original Hough AMERICAN WOODS or in Robert Speller & Sons, Publishers Hough's Encyclopaedia of American Woods Volumes I through XVI mounted card forms, the Hough Wood Specimen Collection in this offer provides a large number of specimens of a given species and type of section thereof (transverse, radial, or tangential) in one single repository, e.g. as shown in the following representative Hough Wood Specimen Collection Catalog Data, i.e. number of sections in each of 50 boxes (approx. 4 % of the twelve hundred boxes of the Hough Wood Specimen Collection):

Box 7.  Sugar pine; Pinus lambertiana Dougl.; 360 transverse sections.

Box 8.  Sugar pine; Pinus lambertiana Dougl.; 190 radial sections.

Box 9.  Sugar pine; Pinus lambertiana Dougl.; 210 tangential sections.

Box 46.  Western larch; Larix occidentalis Nutt.; 640 transverse sections.

Box 47.  Western larch; Larix occidentalis Nutt.; 2,160 radial sections.

Box 48.  Western larch; Larix occidentalis Nutt.; 870 tangential sections.

Box 49.  Baldcypress; Taxodi

distichum (L.) Rich.; 810 transverse sections.

Box 50.  Baldcypress; Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.; 420 radial sections.

Box 51.  Baldcypress; Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.; 1,330 tangential sections.

Box 52. Redwood; Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.; 1,020 transverse sections.

Box 53. Redwood; Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.; 1,000 radial sections.

Box 54. Redwood; Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.; 740 tangential sections.

Box 61.  Arizona cypress; Cupressus arizonica Greene; 760 transverse sections.

Box 62.  Arizona cypress; Cupressus arizonica Greene; 1,430 radial sections.

Box 63.  Arizona cypress; Cupressus arizonica Greene; 1,660 tangential sections.

Box 73. California torreya; Torreya californica Torr.; 1,620 transverse sections.

Box 85.  Water hickory; Carya aquatica (Michx. f.) Nutt.; 560 transverse sections.

Box. 133. California buckeye; Aesculus californica (Spach) Nutt.; 760 transverse sections.

Box 134. California buckeye; Aesculus californica (Spach) Nutt.; 1,320 radial sections.

Box 135. California buckeye; Aesculus californica (Spach) Nutt.; 450 tangential sections.  

Box 142.  Black tupelo; Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.; 620 transverse sections.

Box 145. American basswood; Tilia americana L.; 680 transverse sections.

Box 146. American basswood; Tilia americana L.; 1,060 radial sections.

Box 147. American basswood; Tilia americana L.; 1,650 tangential sections.

Box 169. Engelmann spruce; Picea engelmannii Parry; 760 transverse sections.

Box 170. Engelmann spruce; Picea engelmannii Parry; 1,360 radial sections.

Box 171. Englemann spruce; Picea engelmannii Parry; 1,120 tangential sections.

Box 178. Bristlecone fir (Venusta); Abies bractenta D. Don; 1,560 transverse sections.

Box 179. Bristlecone fir (Venusta); Abies bractenta D. Don; 1,200 radial sections.

Box 295. Swamp-privet; Forestiera acuminata (Michx.) Poir.; 750 transverse sections.

Box 296. Swamp-privet; Forestiera acuminata (Michx.) Poir.; 2,420 radial sections.

Box 297. Swamp-privet; Forestiera acuminata (Michx.) Poir.; 2,800 tangential sections. 

Box 304. Digger pine; Pinus sabiniana Dougl.; 810 transverse sections.

 Box 305. Digger pine; Pinus sabiniana Dougl.; 720 radial sections.

Box 306. Digger pine; Pinus sabiniana Dougl.; 1,440 tangential sections.

Box 355. Kentucky coffeetree; Gymnocladus dioicus (L.) K. Koch; 810 transverse sections.

Box 356. Kentucky coffeetree; Gymnocladus dioicus (L.) K. Koch; 930 radial sections.

Box 357. Kentucky coffeetree; Gymnocladus dioicus (L.) K. Koch; 510 tangential sections.

Box 385. Western Juniper; Juniperus occidentals Hook.; 1,320 transverse sections. 

Box 386. Western Juniper; Juniperus occidentalis Hook.; 570 radial sections. 

Box 387. Western Juniper; Juniperus occidentalis Hook.; 860 tangential sections.

Box 436. Ogeechee tupelo; Nyssa ogeche Bartr.; 540 transverse sections.

Box 437. Ogeechee tupelo; Nyssa ogeche Bartr.; 1,050 radial sections.

Box 438. Ogeechee tupelo; Nyssa ogeche Bartr.; 400 tangential sections.

Box 559. Sour orange; Citrus aurantium L.; 350 transverse sections.

Box 560. Sour orange; Citrus aurantium L.; 950 radial sections.

Box 561. Sour orange; Citrus aurantium L.; 2,200 tangential sections.

Box 565. Spanish cedar; Cedrela adorata L.; 1,050 transverse sections.

Box 566. Spanish cedar: Cedrela adorata L.; 1,600 radial sections.

Box 567. Spanish cedar; Cedrela adorata L.; 800 tangential sections.

Note: Above 52,110 verified and cataloged wood sections are available for immediate shipment at $20.00 per section, or for $1,042,200.00


   Only by possessing the Hough Wood Specimen Collection offered hereby can a large number of sections of each species and type of section cut by Romeyn Beck Hough himself be found in one single repository that can enable any kind of advanced research use not possible in a single sample per species and type of section form as in previously issued reference works composed of mounted cards.