Homemade Wood Toys

    homemade
  • Made at home, rather than in a store or factory
  • made or produced in the home or by yourself; "homemade bread"
  • homeMADE is an Australian reality television series that airs on the Nine Network. It premiered on 10 May 2009, and episodes air twice weekly on Tuesdays at 7:30pm and again at 9:30pm. The series is presented by David Heimann, who also acts as a mentor to the contestants.
  • Made in the home; Made by oneself; In a simple style as if made at home
    wood
  • forest: the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
  • The hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub
  • A golf club with a wooden or other head that is relatively broad from face to back (often with a numeral indicating the degree to which the face is angled to loft the ball)
  • Such material when cut and used as timber or fuel
  • the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
  • United States film actress (1938-1981)
    toys
  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something
  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness
  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"
  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with
  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"
  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult
homemade wood toys
homemade wood toys - Natural Wooden
Natural Wooden Toys: 75 Easy-to-Make and Kid-Safe Designs to Inspire Imaginations & Creative Play
Natural Wooden Toys: 75 Easy-to-Make and Kid-Safe Designs to Inspire Imaginations & Creative Play
Think making safe, colorful, and irresistible imagination-building wooden toys is impossible? Think again! Erin Freutchel-Dearing, a stay-at-home mom who taught herself how to make toys without any prior woodworking experience, show with step-by-step instructions how to make cute and creative wooden toys for children using just a scroll saw, a palm sander, and a drill. Explore more than 75 charming designs in Fairytale, Forest, Farm, Ocean, and City themes:
*Ocean wave stacker
*Fairytale princess
*4-piece bunny family
*15 parent and baby animal pairs, including seahorses, cows, and squirrels
*Vehicles, including a tractor, boat, and airplane
Instructions on creating natural and non-toxic colorful finishes are included. Sidebars throughout the book explain how to incorporate open-ended Waldorf-style elements into your child's play. These captivating wooden toys will encourage a child's creativity by helping them set a scene with a backdrop, characters, and accessories—the rest is up to them!

homemade to-fu
homemade to-fu
I made him for Shira, for her birthday.
Homemade
Homemade
Home made toy truck.
homemade wood toys
Home-Made Toys For Girls And Boys (Illustrated)
Home-Made Toys For Girls And Boys (Illustrated)

by A. Neely Hall


Copyright, 1915, BY
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD COMPANY
Published, August, 1915

All rights reserved

HOME-MADE TOYS FOR GIRLS AND BOYS
Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing Co.—Berwick & Smith Co.
Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

[Pg v]
Constructive ideas expel destructive ideas from the juvenile mind.

INTRODUCTORY NOTES
Through the author's handicraft volumes, and magazine and newspaper articles, thousands of boys and girls who never realized they could make their own toys, have succeeded in constructing models which would do credit to Santa Claus' master toy-makers.
The success of this new home industry has suggested the need of a volume devoted entirely to toy-making, and in Home-made Toys for Girls and Boys the author has brought together a large number of the toy ideas from his former handicraft volumes, and from his articles published in the Ladies' Home Journal, Woman's Home Companion, Good Housekeeping, the Boys' Magazine, and other publications, and he believes that as collected and arranged the material will be found a veritable gold-mine of toy-making information.
Go to any toy store and price the toys similar to those described within these covers, then estimate if you can how much the other toys you do not find would cost if manufactured, and you will discover that one hundred dollars would not cover their value. One splendid thing about these home-made toys is that the greater part of them require little more than the pick-up material found at home. Few boys and girls are given a one hundred dollar assortment of toys at a time, yet any one can own a collection of this value who is willing to spend the time necessary to follow the instructions given in this book. Probably, though, some of the toys will be wanted now, and the others one, two or three seasons hence, because, you see, the book is an all-the-year-round handy book with suggestions for every season. Some of the toys will be of especial interest to boys, yet girls who like what boys like will enjoy making them also.
[Pg vi]
Home-made toys are generally longer lived than store toys because the boy or girl who expends a certain amount of effort producing gives them better care. Home-made toys have a greater value than boughten ones because there is as much fun making them as playing with them. Doing something interesting, getting satisfying results out of the work, putting an idea into tangible form, and having a toy to show of which it can be said, "I made this all myself,"—these are the factors in toy-making so fascinating to boys and girls.
It is no less a child's nature to want to do that which is most pleasing to him, than an adult's, so why not encourage this wholesome activity of toy-making to which the child takes as readily as a duck takes to water? It trains the mind to think clearly, the hands to work cleverly, replaces destructive thoughts with constructive ideas, and, in making the boy or girl dependent upon himself or herself for toys, is invaluable in developing resourcefulness.
Recognizing how easily the child's interest is attracted and held by anything of a building nature, toy manufacturers have placed scores of so-called "construction sets" upon the market, but, though excellent as these outfits are, the toys they form are merely assembled, not really made by the boy or girl, and much of the value of making is lost. Exactly as good models as those assembled with "construction sets" can be made of pick-up materials, as chapters in this book show. In fact, some of the models in the manufacturers' instruction pamphlets—merry-go-rounds, Ferris wheels and swings—are almost identical with home-made models devised long ago by the author for his readers. Furthermore, there are many, very many toys in Home-made Toys for Girls and Boys which are beyond the limited possibilities of "construction sets."
A. N. H.

Oak Park, Illinois,
May 31, 1915.

Home-Made Toys For Girls And Boys (Illustrated)

by A. Neely Hall


Copyright, 1915, BY
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD COMPANY
Published, August, 1915

All rights reserved

HOME-MADE TOYS FOR GIRLS AND BOYS
Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing Co.—Berwick & Smith Co.
Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

[Pg v]
Constructive ideas expel destructive ideas from the juvenile mind.

INTRODUCTORY NOTES
Through the author's handicraft volumes, and magazine and newspaper articles, thousands of boys and girls who never realized they could make their own toys, have succeeded in constructing models which would do credit to Santa Claus' master toy-makers.
The success of this new home industry has suggested the need of a volume devoted entirely to toy-making, and in Home-made Toys for Girls and Boys the author has brought together a large number of the toy ideas from his former handicraft volumes, and from his articles published in the Ladies' Home Journal, Woman's Home Companion, Good Housekeeping, the Boys' Magazine, and other publications, and he believes that as collected and arranged the material will be found a veritable gold-mine of toy-making information.
Go to any toy store and price the toys similar to those described within these covers, then estimate if you can how much the other toys you do not find would cost if manufactured, and you will discover that one hundred dollars would not cover their value. One splendid thing about these home-made toys is that the greater part of them require little more than the pick-up material found at home. Few boys and girls are given a one hundred dollar assortment of toys at a time, yet any one can own a collection of this value who is willing to spend the time necessary to follow the instructions given in this book. Probably, though, some of the toys will be wanted now, and the others one, two or three seasons hence, because, you see, the book is an all-the-year-round handy book with suggestions for every season. Some of the toys will be of especial interest to boys, yet girls who like what boys like will enjoy making them also.
[Pg vi]
Home-made toys are generally longer lived than store toys because the boy or girl who expends a certain amount of effort producing gives them better care. Home-made toys have a greater value than boughten ones because there is as much fun making them as playing with them. Doing something interesting, getting satisfying results out of the work, putting an idea into tangible form, and having a toy to show of which it can be said, "I made this all myself,"—these are the factors in toy-making so fascinating to boys and girls.
It is no less a child's nature to want to do that which is most pleasing to him, than an adult's, so why not encourage this wholesome activity of toy-making to which the child takes as readily as a duck takes to water? It trains the mind to think clearly, the hands to work cleverly, replaces destructive thoughts with constructive ideas, and, in making the boy or girl dependent upon himself or herself for toys, is invaluable in developing resourcefulness.
Recognizing how easily the child's interest is attracted and held by anything of a building nature, toy manufacturers have placed scores of so-called "construction sets" upon the market, but, though excellent as these outfits are, the toys they form are merely assembled, not really made by the boy or girl, and much of the value of making is lost. Exactly as good models as those assembled with "construction sets" can be made of pick-up materials, as chapters in this book show. In fact, some of the models in the manufacturers' instruction pamphlets—merry-go-rounds, Ferris wheels and swings—are almost identical with home-made models devised long ago by the author for his readers. Furthermore, there are many, very many toys in Home-made Toys for Girls and Boys which are beyond the limited possibilities of "construction sets."
A. N. H.

Oak Park, Illinois,
May 31, 1915.