Researching Children of the Holocaust
A Webquest Based on Surviving Hitler: A Boy in the Nazi Death Camps, by Andrea Warren

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Online Resources

The Process

 

Before you begin, read the entire webquest. In the Evaluation section, you will find the scoring guide that your teacher will use to evaluate your writer’s notebook as well as a timeline. Be sure you complete all the requirements to earn the grade you desire. For each specific assignment below, there are suggested websites. You may use other sources as Mrs. Fansher discussed with you in class - click here for a copy of the Research Resource Guide.

As a writer researching historical events, it is critical that you find/use accurate information. Be sure to consult with your teacher about the sources you are using if you are not certain that they are reliable sources. The final page of your notebook should be a bibliography listing all sources you used for the project. Use Citation Maker to create a citation for each source you use. Copy and paste each citation onto your bibliography page. Keep the citations in alphabetical order

 

Step 1.

Andrea Warren, a successful writer, has many helpful tips for aspiring writers at her website. Read what she has to say and explore the other pages of her website. Write down in your own words what it takes to be a successful writer.  Document this website.  At the end of your book before the Works Cited page, you will place your summary of what she says and then reflect on it through this process.  Your summary should be at least 10 lines long and your reflection should also be a minimum of 10 lines. 

 

Step 2.

You will need to choose a child as the subject of your book.

  • Go to Museum of Tolerance
  • Choose one of the children you find there, email Mrs. Thomas (ethomas@greenville.k12.sc.us) the name for approval. Then, print out a copy of his/her story and a photo of him/her.
  • The next page(s) of your notebook should include the photo and ten facts youread about him/her that you want to include in your book.  Remember to document the site you get the information from here. 

Step 3.

The next page(s) of your writer’s notebook should include your research to answer the following questions about your child:

a) What original country did your child come from?

b) What was life like for Jews in that country before the war?

c) When was that country invaded by the Germans?

d) What happened to Jews once the country was invaded?

 

  • Use the links from the following site to help you research the answers to those questions.  Follow these directions Geography of the Holocaust
  • Then, go here for more help, too.  Midwest Center for Holocaust Education Once on this cite, scroll down to Appendices, and then click on the country you need information on.  Remember to cite your sources. 

Step 4.

You now need to research what happened to your child during the war. Was your child in hiding, in a camp, saved by rescuers? Use the MCHE site links to complete this

research. Witnesses to the Holocaust

If your person is not listed with information you need, then use an alternative resource to locate information on your person.  

You may also use other sites and/or books suggested by your teacher. Keep all your notes in your writer’s notebook. Be sure you cite the sources from which you took the notes.

The notes should be in your own words. Be sure to correctly punctuate any direct quotations you use.

 

Step 5.

Research what happened to your child after the war. If you cannot find specific information on your child, research what might have happened to a child in similar circumstances. If your child did not survive, research what happened in your child’s country after the war. Use the MCHE site links to complete this research.

Witness to the Holocaust Archive

If your person is not listed with information you need, then go Use alternative resources to find this information. You may also use other sites and/or books suggested by your teacher. The book, From the Heart and Mosaic of Memory, both of which are available through the

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education would be useful sources of information.

Keep all your notes in your writer’s notebook. Be sure you note the sources from which you took the notes. Be sure to correctly punctuate any direct quotations you use.

 

Step 6. 

You will also need a minimum of 5 pictures.  These pictures can emphasize any aspect of your information such as their picture, the picture of the concentration camp, or anything else you can think of.  It does not have to be your person but it can be a symbol to represent some aspect of your writing.  Each picture should be placed on or behind your information.  A caption should accompany it to explain what it is. 

 

Step 7.

Your final activity to complete your notebook is to create a title for your book and design its cover. The cover should include the title, your name as author, and an illustration or photo. Use this cover as the cover of your writer’s notebook or the first slide in your digital notebook.

 

You have completed all the prerequisites for writing the story of another child of the Holocaust. Before you present your work to the class, check the scoring guide one final

time to be sure you completed all the requirements. You will then be ready to present your child’s story, through your eyes as the author, to your class and teacher.