2017 Classes 1-3



1st Class, Thursday, February 2, 2017, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Carriage House at Belmont Manor and Historic Park, Elkridge

 

Introduction to Legacy Leadership Environmental Institute

 1.   Welcome coffee and breakfast snacks (9:00 – 9:15)

 2.   Introduction to Legacy Leadership Environmental Institute (9:15-9:30)

ELL Coordinators: Cathy Hudson, cmhudson@comcast.net; Tracey Manning, tmanning@umd.edu; Barb Schmeckpeper, holliebjs@gmail.com;  Betsy Singer, betsysing@gmail.com;  Audrey Suhr, asuhr@comcast.net

 

3.   Brief Introductions (9:30 – 10:00)

Participants

 4.   What Legacy Leadership Means – and Can Mean – to You. (10:00 – 11:15)

Tracey Manning, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Health Services Administration, UMCP; tmanning@umd.edu

 Speaker objectives:

o       Describe history and outcomes of Legacy Leadership Institutes.

o       Briefly describe a personal area of environmental concern and/or interest.

o       Apply neuroscience of learning and unlearning to benefiting from institute experience.

o       Relate individual interests to non-positional leadership and civic engagement.

 As a result, participants will be able to:

o       Explain what “leadership” and “legacy” means in the context of a Legacy Leadership Institute.

o       Identify environmental interests within the class.

o       Recognize how brain functioning can foster or inhibit learning.

o       Explore ways of acting on behalf of the environment with non-positional leadership.

 Break (11:15 – 11:30)

 5.   Faces of Howard County Environmentalists I: The Environmental Volunteer Experience (11:30 – 11:50)

Tim Titus and Van Wensil Graduates of Howard County Legacy Leadership Institute for the Environment (HoLLIE)

 Speakers’ objectives:

o       Legacy Leaders from prior years will introduce themselves to ELL class

o       Leaders will share information on their experiences.

 As a result, participants will:

o       begin thinking about their own engagement in environmental activities

o       appreciate the potential applications and opportunities because of the ELL course

Lunch (11:50 – 12:15)

 6.   Meet Your Fellow Legacy Leaders: Tell Your Story (12:15 – 2:00)

ELL Coordinators: Cathy Hudson, Tracey Manning, Barb Schmeckpeper, Betsy Singer, Audrey Suhr

 

Speakers’ objectives:

o       Explain objectives of Story-telling: (5 min/person)

o       Coordinators will tell their stories

o       Class members will tell their stories (5 min each).

As a result, participants will be able to describe:

o       Who (name) their fellow classmates are.

o       Something about them that led them to ELL today.

Break (2:00 – 2:10)

 7.   Environmental Initiatives of Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks (2:10 -3:10)

John S. Marshall, Chief, Bureau of Parks and Program Services; jsmarshall@howardcountymd.gov

 Speaker’s objectives:

o       Introduce participants to Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks.

o       Describe what the DRP is doing to protect the local environment.

o       Describe some of the environmental issues facing our community.

o       Describe the challenges our community faces in reaching our environmental goals.

 As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o       How the Howard County DRP manages its environmental responsibilities.

o       How citizens can assist in reaching shared environmental goals.

 Q & A (3:10 – 3:25)

 8.   Upcoming Class, Evaluation (3:25 – 4:00)

ELL Coordinators

 Speaker objectives:

o       Introduce concept of volunteering and earning designation of HoLLIE.

o       Describe literature on environmental opportunities (assign Ned Tillman’s book The Chesapeake Watershed: A Sense of Place and a Call to Action for discussion during Class 5 on March 2).

o       Develop class norms

o       Organize snack contributions

o       Organize carpools for NASA and collect required information for entry

o       Distribute class daily evaluations

 As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o       Preparation for upcoming classes and discussions

o       How they will get to NASA

 


2nd Class, Thursday, February 9, 2017, 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

Building 33, Room H114, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt

 

What Informed Citizens Need to Know about Earth Systems Science

 

Understanding the Tools and the State of Art in Earth Science

 

1.   Satellite Contributions to Understanding the Earth System. (8:30 - 9:45)

Claire Parkinson, Ph.D., Climate Change Senior Scientist, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC); claire.l.parkinson@nasa.gov

 Speaker Objectives:

o       Provide an overview of the value of Earth-observing satellites for increasing our understanding of the Earth system.

o       Provide an overview of the importance of Earth-observing satellites for recognizing and addressing current and future environmental challenges:

o       Earth energy balance

o       ozone hole

o       greenhouse gases

o       atmosphere/land/ocean temperatures

o       land and ocean vegetation

o       Earth’s ice cover

 Break (9:45 – 10:00)

 2.   Sea Ice Changes as a Microcosm of Climate Change (10:00 – 11:15)

Claire Parkinson, Ph.D., Climate Change Senior Scientist, NASA’s GSFC; claire.l.parkinson@nasa.gov

 Speaker Objectives:

o       Discuss NASA’s research on sea ice over the long term, its capabilities and information it provides.

o      Place the satellite-observed changes in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice into the broader context of climate change.

o       Discuss key factors influencing changing perspectives of sea ice and climate change.

o       Illustrate, through one scientist’s career, changes in research techniques and

perspectives related to earth systems science.

 As a result of these two presentations and follow-on discussions, participants will appreciate:

o       The motivations behind space based observing and the technological advances that have enabled satellite observing of environmental processes and effects on local, regional and global scales.

o       The value of satellites in enabling the Earth to be properly viewed as it is -- an “Earth System” comprised of interacting atmosphere, oceans, land, ice, and biological systems operating across multiple scales.

 Q & A (11:15 – 11:30)

3.  Visit to Mission Operations (11:30 – 12:30)

William Guit, M.S., Aqua Mission Director, NASA’s GSFC; william.j.guit@nasa.gov

 Speaker Objectives:

o       Discuss work of Mission Control

o       In planning mission

o       In controlling spaceflight

o       In acquiring data

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will

o       Appreciate the complexity of planning missions and acquiring data from satellites.

Lunch (12:30 – 1:15)

 Understanding the Science of Earth’s Cycles

 4.  Gray Wave of the Great Transformation: A Satellite View of Urbanization, Climate Change, and Food Security. (1:15 – 2:15)

Marc Imhoff, Ph.D., University of Maryland's Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC); mimhoff@umd.edu

 Speaker objectives:

o       Discuss land cover change driven by human activity with impacts ranging from loss of biological diversity to changes in regional and global climate.

o       Describe change that has been so pervasive and progressed so rapidly, compared to natural processes, that scientists refer to it as "the great transformation.”

o       Explain how urbanization, or the 'gray wave' of land transformation, is being increasingly recognized as an important process in global climate change.

o       Describe how large urban conglomerates alter the land surface so that both local climate and the basic ecology of the landscape are affected, with consequences to human health and economic well-being.

o       Discuss long-term programs for global and regional monitoring and assessment using a suite of Earth observing satellites to study the interactions between urbanization, biological processes, and weather and climate.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will gain an appreciation for what we are learning by using these Earth Observatories and how

o       Urban heat islands form and, potentially, how to ameliorate them.

o       Urbanization can affect rainfall, pollution, and surface water recharge at the local level.

o       Urbanization can affect climate and food security globally.

 Q & A (2:15 – 2:30)

 Break (2:30 – 2:45)

 5.   Carbon Cycle (2:45 – 3:45)

Forrest Hall, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Office for Global Carbon Studies, NASA’s GSFC and UMBC; forrest.g.hall@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

With an integrated system perspective, use examples drawn from current carbon cycle research to

o       Explain the basic underlying science and interactions.

o       Discuss outstanding issues and challenges (e.g., global warming).

o       Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for environmental monitoring, assessment and prediction.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o       Understand fundamental carbon cycle components and interactions.

o       Understand some of the major advances and challenges in carbon cycle research, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional to global scales (e.g., global warming).

o       Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (3:45 – 4:00)


3th Class, Thursday, February 16, 2017, 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

Building 33, Room H114 (must leave room by 2:30), NASA’s GSFC, Greenbelt

                                                      

What Informed Citizens Need to Know about Earth Systems Science

Understanding the Science of Earth’s Cycles, cont.

 

1.   Ice Sheets: Understanding Change in the Polar Regions (8:30 – 9:30)

Kelly M. Brunt, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), University of Maryland and NASA Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA's GSFC; kelly.m.brunt@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

From a perspective of satellite and aircraft observations:

o       Explain how ice sheets change.

o       Show how we measure and study that change.

o       Show that recent changes of ice sheets are surprisingly large.

o       Discuss what change is significant.

o       Illustrate what the future ice sheets might do..

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o       Understand processes that drive both slow and rapid ice-sheet response to environmental changes.

o      Appreciate the relevance of ice-sheet change.

o       Appreciate the importance of satellite observation and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (9:30 – 9:45)

 Break (9:45 – 10:00)

2.   Land-based Hydrological Cycle. (10:00 – 11:00)

Matthew Rodell, Ph.D., Chief, Hydrological Sciences Laboratory; NASA’s GSFC; matthew.rodell@NASA.gov

 Speaker objectives:

With an integrated system perspective, use examples drawn from current research in the field of hydrology to

o       Explain the basic underlying science and interactions.

o       Discuss outstanding issues and challenges (e.g., data gaps, groundwater depletion, etc.).

o      Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for environmental monitoring, assessment and prediction.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o       Understand fundamental hydrological cycle components and interactions.

o       Understand some of the major advances and challenges in hydrological sciences, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional to global scales.

o       Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (11:00 – 11:15)

 3.   Observing the Living Oceans from Space (11:15 - 12:15)

Sergio Signorini, Ph.D., Senior Scientist/Lead Data Analyst, Science Applications International Corporation, at NASA’s GSFC;

sergio.signorini-1@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

o       With an integrated system perspective, examples are drawn from current ocean research.

o       The applications of satellite-derived ocean color data range from providing the information needed for a more accurate assessment of the role of the ocean in global change to providing a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies.

o       The color images of the Earth's changing land and ocean features will be of significant use in fisheries management, agriculture assessment and coastal zone monitoring.

o       There is no question that the Earth is changing.  Ocean color measurements from space have enabled us for the first time to monitor the biological consequences of that change - to see how the things we do, and how natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life.

o       What can be learned about Chesapeake Bay from such imagery?

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o       Understand fundamental interactions and components in ocean dynamics and biology.

o       Understand some of the major advances and challenges in ocean dynamics and biology, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional (e.g., Chesapeake Bay) to global scales.

o        Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (12:15 – 12:30)

 Lunch (12:30 – 1:00)

 4.   How the Montreal Protocol Saved the Earth’s Ozone Layer (1:00 – 2:00)

Paul A. Newman, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Chief Scientist for Atmospheric Sciences, Earth Sciences Division at NASA's GSFC; paul.a.newman@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

When the production of human-produced long-lived chlorine and bromine compounds threatened the Earth’s ozone layer, the Montreal Protocol was negotiated to solve this problem.  This presentation will:

o                   Explain the basic underlying science and interactions of ozone and how human-produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) impacted our ozone layer.

o       Discuss outstanding issues and challenges on ozone and climate (e.g., reports on atmospheric ozone by Scientific Assessment Panel to Montreal Protocol)

o      Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for atmospheric monitoring, assessment, and prediction.

o      Describe how these technologies and strategies lead to continual updates on the stratospheric ozone layer and continue to inform policy makers.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o       Understand fundamental atmospheric ozone components and interactions.

o       Understand some of the major advances and challenges in ozone science, and their relevance to detecting, understanding, and projecting environmental changes.

o       Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observation and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (2:00 – 2:15)

 Break and travel by cars to Lab (2:15 – 2:45)

 From Satellite Data to Computer Models

 5.   Site Visit to GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio and Remote Sensing Labs

(2:45 – 3:45)

Horace Mitchell, Ph.D., Director, Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA's GSFC; Horace.G.Mitchell@NASA.gov

 Speaker objectives:

o       Illustrate how environmental observations are locally and globally acquired, processed, analyzed and integrated with computer models.

o       Illustrate how large-scale environmental observations are visualized in ways that enable new scientific insights.

 As a result, participants will:

o         Gain an appreciation of how understanding complex environmental phenomena is being advanced through combined use of satellite remote sensing and computer models.

Q & A (3:45 – 4:00)

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