Added: February 4, 2017 – Last updated: February 4, 2017

TITLE INFORMATION


Author: Ewa Koźmińska-Frejlak

Title: "I'm Going to the Oven Because I Wouldn't Give Myself to Him"

Subtitle: The Role of Gender in the Polish Jewish Civic Court

In: Jewish Honor Courts: Revenge, Retribution, and Reconciliation in Europe and Israel after the Holocaust

Edited by: Laura Jockusch and Gabriel N. Finder

Place: Detroit, MI

Publisher: Wayne State University Press in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Year: 2015

Pages: 247-278

ISBN-13: 9780814338773 (pbk.) – Find a Library: Wikipedia, WorldCat | ISBN-13: 9780814338780 (ebk.) – Find a Library: Wikipedia, WorldCat

Language: English

Keywords: Modern History: 20th Century | European History: Polish History | Prosecution: Trials



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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


Abstract: »The treatment of women in honor courts is explored in a case study of the modus operandi of one honor court. Ewa Koźmińska-Frejlak's chapter, "'I'm Going to the Oven Because I Wouldn't Give Myself to Him': The Role of Gender in the Polish Jewish Civic Court," identifies a close link between prewar Jewish views of women, including their "proper" place in society, and the Polish honor court's handling of such cases. Only a small number of Jewish women were investigated by the lawyers attached to this honor court, and an even smaller number stood trial before it. Almost all of them were accused of being prison functionaries or kapos in concentration camps. The reason for this is simple: As a consequence of prewar attitudes, which discouraged the employment of women in positions of responsibility, virtually no women became officials in Jewish councils. Yet several women were held responsible for the actions of their husbands who served on Jewish councils, in the Jewish police, or as kapos. Moreover, the role of gener in the Polish Jewish honor court was subject to a double standard that was largely dictated by traditional views of the female body. Some female defendants were suspected, both in overt terms and in insinuations, of exchanging their bodies in return for favors from German and others, including Jewish kapos. But when women were the victims of sexual abuse by Jewish men, the Jewish lawyers and judges, almost all of them men, were, with rare exceptions, loath to make it the basis for an indictment, let alone a conviction. Koźmińska-Frejlak concludes that the Polish Jewish honor court, reflecting the sentiment and norms of the postwar Jewish community in whose name it acted, in large part validated and reinforced the prewar conception of gender roles.« (Source: Laura Jockusch and Gabriel N. Finder. »Introduction: Revenge, Retribution, and Reconciliation ni the Postwar Jewish World.« Jewish Honor Courts: Revenge, Retribution, and Reconciliation in Europe and Israel after the Holocaust. Edited by Laura Jockusch et al. Detroit 2015: 19-20)

Reviews:

Rybak, Jan. Chilufim: Zeitschrift für Jüdische Kulturgeschichte No. 19 (2015): 166-169 – Full Text: ResearchGate (Free Access)

Rapaport Lynn. Holocaust Genocide Studies 30(3) (Winter 2016): 553-556. – Full Text: Oxfort University Press (Restricted Access)

Wikipedia: History of Europe: History of Poland