Fayard 2011 Rape

Title Information


Authors: Nicole Fayard and Yvette Rocheron

Title: "Moi quand on dit qu'une femme ment, eh bien, elle ment"

Subtitle: The Administration of Rape in Twenty-first Century France and England & Wales

Journal: French Politics, Culture & Society

Volume: 29

Issue: 1

Year: Spring 2011

Pages: 68-92

ISSN: 1537-6370 – Find a Library: WordCat eISSN: 1558-5271 – Find a Library: WordCat

Language: English

Keywords: 21th Century | English History, French History, Welsh History



Full Text


Link: Berghahn Journals (Restricted Access)

Link: ingentaconnect (Restricted Access)



Additional Information


Authors: Nicole Fayard, School of Modern Languages, University of Leicester

Abstract: »In France and England & Wales rape is now understood as a diverse social phenomenon. It is reported, counted, categorized, and dealt with by the authorities as a serious crime. Yet, despite notable initiatives intended to improve the conviction of alleged perpetrators, major hurdles for alleged victims remain. We show how rape is defined and prosecuted in France and England & Wales, and we use statistical analyzes to understand the scale of the problem, still largely unknown. We also discuss recent controversies (attrition rate;loicadre), exploring a culture of scepticism among police and judiciary that causes complaints to be dropped or downgraded to lesser crimes. Our interview material from France explores two difficulties: When is rape not rape? Did the alleged victim consent to the penetration? Finally we analyze the paradoxical role played by voluntary victim support groups that resist but also collude with a complex regulatory system that fails those who do not speak in legitimate codes.« (Source: Historical Abstracts)

Contents:

  International Context (p. 68)
  French and English contexts (p. 70)
  Defining Rape (p. 72)
    Legal Definitions in France (p. 72)
    Legal Definitions in England & Wales (p. 72)
  Counting Rape in France and England & Wales (p. 73)
    What is the scale of the problem? (p. 74)
  Prosecuting Rapists (p. 76)
  Policing Victims (p. 78)
  Redefining Victims (p. 81)
  Conclusion: Will the "Justice Gap" Remain? (p. 87)
  Notes (p. 89)

Added: February 21, 2015 – Last updated: February 21, 2015