Added: August 6, 2016 – Last updated: August 6, 2016

TITLE INFORMATION


Author: Sidney Chalhoub

Title: The Legacy of Slavery

Subtitle: Tales of Gender and Racial Violence in Machado de Assis

In: Emerging Dialogues on Machado de Assis

Edited by: Lamonte Aido and Daniel F. Silva

Place: New York, NY

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Year: 2016

Pages: 55-69

Series: New Directions in Latino American Cultures

ISBN-13: 9781137543431 (print) – Find a Library: Wikipedia, WorldCat | ISBN-13: 9781137541741 (online) – Find a Library: Wikipedia, WorldCat

Language: English

Keywords: Modern History: 19th Century | American History: Brazilian History | Representations: Literary Texts / Machado de Assis; Types: Interracial Rape, Slave Rape; Victims: Slaves



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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


Author: Sidney Chalhoub, History Department, Harvard University

Abstracts:

»Part 2, "Machado on Race, Identity, and Society," begins with Sidney Chalhoub's chapter, "The Legacy of Slavery: Tales of Gender and Racial Violence in Machado de Assis." Chalhoub explores how the themes of slavery, gender, and racism, seen as intertwined, were manifested in the work of Machado de Assis throughout his career. Chalhoub identifies three moments, successive but also to some degree coeval, in the way in which Machado approached and interrelated these subjects. In the first moment, in texts written mainly in the 1860s and 1870s, he denounced the seigneurial custom of restoring to sexual violence against free and enslaved black women, and depicted these women's dignity in dealing with the problem. Next, in the 1880s, in a very allegorical fashion, some of his works offer nuanced reflections on the relations between division of labor, scientific ideologies, and racial injustice. Finally, in his work spanning the 1890s until his death in 1908, Machado turned to the legacy of slavery and its consequences for Brazilian history and society at the time - after abolition - when national elites sought to erase the violence of Brazil's slaveholding past.« (Source: Lamonte Aidoo and Daniel F. Silva. »Introduction.« Emerging Dialogues on Machado de Assis. Edited by Lamonte Aidoo et al. New York 2016: 5)

»The themes of slavery, gender and racism, seen as intertwined, were present in the work of Machado de Assis throughout his career. It is possible to identify three moments, successive but also to some degree coeval, in the way in which Machado approached and interrelated these subjects. First, he denounced the seigneurial custom of resorting to sexual violence against free and enslaved black women, and depicted these women’s dignity in dealing with the problem (in texts written mainly in the 1860s and 1870s). Second, in very allegorical mode, he analyzed the relations among division of labor, scientific ideologies and racial injustice (1880s). Finally, Machado de Assis turned to the legacy of slavery and its consequences for Brazilian history and society (1890s and 1900s).« (Source: SpringerLink)

Wikipedia: History of the Americas: History of Brazil / Empire of Brazil, First Brazilian Republic | Literature: Brazilian literature / Machado de Assis