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The History of Mather & Platt Limited                 
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 The Last Days of Newton Heath ...        
   Integrity & Industry"      
                                                                                                                                                                                                       

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        Marcel André BOSCHI & David DREW-SMYTHE              

        Copyright © all rights reserved 10 février 2017               

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         CONTENTS


The Salford Iron Works Salford Iron Works 

Mather & Platt - an overview of history - Partnership > Company M+P Ltd. 


Park Works - Newton Heath - early print Park Works
Mather & Platt Company Departments Departments
Mather & Platt - Park Works at War M&P at War
Dowson, Taylor & Co. Dowson Taylor & Co. Ltd.  

Menu for Histories of International M+P CompaniesInternational
Mather & Platt Company Company
The Grinnell Company in America - History  Grinnell Co.
Mather & Platt Features Features
Mather & Platt People People
The Portrait Gallery The Gallery
  
Mather & Platt
Long Service Association

Click to enter - Mather & Platt Long Service Association - includes a photographic cycle of the last days of Park Works at Newton Heath ...

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GUESTBOOK - please leave a footprint ... Guest Book
E-MAIL to Marcel E-mail 


Introduction
Marcel Boschi historian of Mather & Platt Limited 

I live in France. I have assembled this material in order to illustrate and to record the celebrated history of Mather and Platt  the original British-based engineering company with which          - especially my father Ernest Boschi - has had a long association.    
                                                                                                                                                                                              
I was born in the French city of Roubaix which, like Bradford and Manchester in England, for example, used to be one of the world centres of the wool and cotton industries. Roubaix had, once upon a time, many flourishing factories and mills.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
I began my professional life with "S.A. Mather & Platt", in France. My early career with the company ended in 1955 when in February I joined "L'UNION" - then the first insurances  company in France. This society became, in 1968, "L'U.A.P" and is since 1996 AXA  - a world-leading insurances company. 
In February 1994 at my retirement, I was regional commercial manager of several French provinces, I was also  member of the General Inspection's corps.
  

The company, Mather and Platt was well known and highly regarded in Roubaix and its surrounding districts. Both Lille, Roubaix,Tourcoing were also textile centres in France. The demise of the textile industry was - for Roubaix as for so many European centres - a severe shock to the local economy and today there are practically no textile installations in the region. In the main, the old factories and workers' houses have been demolished although some of the former have been turned to other uses. Over the years, associations have rallied together to try to preserve a part of the cultural heritage of industries Roubaix, much factories are destroyed like the French factories of Mather & Platt at Roubaix and the tower of M+P at Manchester         

(click on this image)

                    Marcel Boschi, historian 

As a result of the pioneering work on fire protection being carried out in England by companies such as Dowson, Taylor & Company Limited. and Mather & Platt - both of Manchester, and by Frederick Grinnell's company in America, from 1883 on wards, thousands of Grinnell type fire sprinklers were installed in these factories to reduce the risk of fire damage to both plant and product and in order to safeguard the workforce. Eventually a fully-fledged the French company. Mather & Platt, was established in France in 1921, under the Chairmanship of Sir John Wormald

During the early part of the twentieth century, it was Sir John Wormald's younger brother, Joseph Dawson Wormald, who with another brother, Henry Harry Percy Wormald founded the Australian company Wormald Brothers. This company was incorporated as a limited company in 1911 and became a public listed company in 1949. In a cyclical way and almost a hundred years after Sir William Mather began his pioneering development of Mather & Platt's Fire Engineering Division, 

1978 - Wormald International acquire Mather & Platt Ltd. in a massive global take-over.

1990 - Tyco-International is a highly diversified global company that provides thousands of products and services vitally important to residential and commercial customers. Those products range from electronic security and alarm monitoring to fire-fighting equipment and breathing apparatus, and from water purification and flow control solutions to galvanize steel tubes and armoured wire and cable. Tyco International is composed of five business segments: ADT Worldwide, Fire Protection Services, Safety Products, Flow Control Electrical & Metal Products. As one of the world's leading employers, Tyco employs more than 110,000 people in over 60 countries. Tyco has more than $18 billion in annual revenue with leading brands in high-growth industries. Every day, we help make the world safer and more secure.

2017 -Johnson and Tyco merge


Acknowledgements -

In telling this story it has proved impossible to mention, all the names of employees of Mather & Platt Limited who have contributed to the success of the business. This is partly because it is often invidious to select certain names from among the rest since it is difficult to collect information about some worthy people who left their mark on the fortunes of the firm over fifty years ago or in the more remote periods of its history. Yet it was the efforts of these individuals who made this story possible, for economic progress was not achieved anonymously or automatically. The company has grown as a result of the loyalty and service of its directors, staff and work people, each of whom had their own story to tell.

I have to thank so many people for helping with the compilation of the material for this history, for telling their own stories and for placing invaluable information at our disposal. These people are so numerous that it would be invidious to mention them all by name. The Chairmen, the directors, the managers, the staff, the foremen and the workers, have all helped us to learn much of Mather & Platt Limited, not only as it was, but as it is in the middle of the twentieth century.

I acknowledge a variety of internet sources. In addition to my own special collection, I am especially grateful for access to Mather & Platt Ltd. and Dowson, Taylor & Co. memorabilia, archives and associated material. I appreciate the generous support of staff at S.A. Mather & Platt in France, Wormald Ansul (U.K.) and Weir Pumps Ltd. in Manchester, England, of members of the Mather & Platt Long Service Association and of former employees of Mather & Platt Ltd.

I am especially grateful to my old friend, John F.Taylor, former director and executive officer of the company Mather & Platt Ltd, my friend Peter Mather, Mather families in England and to the Grinnell family in America, my friends Helen Grinnell-KIng, great-granddaughter of Frederick Grinnell, and Larry Grinnell, Secretary and Webmaster of the web site of the Grinnell Family Association of America and also of the participation of my friend David Drew-Smythe, the great-grandson of Sir John Wormald, to the production of this website, died on May 3rd 2012 in Sydney.

would be delighted to hear from anyone with stories to tell or historical documents and items relating to these old and great companies and their managers, engineers and employees. I can be contacted by my e-mail address marcelboschi@aol.com.    


1794 Salford - The birthplace of William & Colin Mather's establishment
- It is among the small men who survived that we first trace Colin Mather Senior cabinetmaker, of Gun Street, Salford, in 1817. He is probably the same man who appears as Colin Mather, a machine maker, and just over ten years later at Waterloo Place. The transition from cabinet making to machine making would be quite a natural one for an immigrant from a non-industrial area. By 1834, he had moved to Brown Street, Salford, that has often been regarded as the birthplace of the firm. The site was convenient, not far from the River Irwell, and by 1836, Colin had become associated with his brother William in an enterprise as that of “Engineers, machine makers and millwrights”, 23 Brown Street. Compared with some rival ventures, William and Colin Mather's establishment appears to have been small and unimportant.

In the decade after the Napoleonic Wars, two of the most renowned engineering partnerships in Manchester, were Peel, Williams and Peel, of the Soho Foundry, Ancoats and Galloway, Bowman and Galloway of Great Bridgewater Street, but by modern standards, these two firms were also small in size. Indeed, for some years Galloway and Bowman merely called themselves millwrights, although they employed pattern makers, iron and brass founders, smith's, firemen, hammermen and turners. Another firm, T.C. Herves, extensively employed in erecting mills and filling them with machinery, found work for 140 to 150 men.

There was one other active concern in Salford, which was to provide the eventual site for the Mather and Platt partnership at the Salford Iron Works. Indeed, the building was known as the Salford Iron Works when William Green drew his map of Salford in 1794. It was then owned by Bateman and Sherratt. Bateman lost interest in the firm, and the Sherratts, a Westmorland family, became the dominant influence.William Mather - brother of (Cast Iron) Colin Mather

In 1795, Aikin wrote that, “a considerable iron foundry is established in Salford, in which are cast most of the articles wanted in Manchester and its neighbourhood. Mr Sharrard is a very ingenious and able engineer, who has improved upon and brought the steam engine to great perfection. Most of those that are used and set up in and about Manchester are of their make and fitting up. They are in general of a small size, very compact, stand in a small space, work smooth and easy and are scarcely heard in the building when erected. They are now in use in cotton mills and for every purpose of the water wheel, where a stream is not available and for winding up coals from a great depth in the coal pits, which is performed with a quickness and ease not conceived”. This was an interesting forecast of the sort of claim that was to be made eventually for engineering operations carried out by Mather & Platt and as a reference, it also showed how established was the Sherratt firm before the Mathers had begun their operations at all.

In 1834, when William and Colin Mather had begun their operations, a wage book dated 1829, established that they were in business as millwrights and engineers at the date that J. & T. Sherratt were described as brass founders, engine makers and iron founders. The description indicates that they were concerned primarily with general engineering rather than with the production of machinery for the textile trade, a task which was still left to small men, although from a later entry, it is clear that the Sherratts continued to do some textile machinery work..    



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        William Mather,Senior (1811-1858)
         
                                                                                                                         
Overview of the Salford Iron Works
Late 19th Century

In 1873 Professor Osborne Reynolds designed a turbine pump which was a definite advance in centrifugal pumping. Mather & Platt developed and improved upon the new invention and in doing so, laid the foundation for what eventually became a flourishing Pump Department.


In 1883 rights to manufacture Edison's electric dynamo were acquired by the firm and, as a result of improvements introduced by Dr. John Hopkinson, the Edison-Hopkinson dynamo reached a degree of perfection not previously known in such machines.This was the first stage in the setting up of the Electrical 
Department.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Also in 1883 - Mr. (later Sir) William Mather, while on a visit to the United States, secured the sole rights from Frederick Grinnell to market the Grinnell automatic sprinkler in all parts of the world except North America. Initially, by the firm of  Mather & Platt and after through Dowson,Taylor & Company Limited itself , they used this event to mark the beginning of yet another side of the firm's activities, the foundation of the Fire Department.

(click on image)
           



            Sir William Mather (1838 -1920) 
           
The men and women - the machines - the work of about one hundred and fifty years, from the early days at Salford Iron Works to the Platts and the entrepreneurial Mathers, the Dowson-Taylor story and the successes of Newton Heath thence to the final chapter of take-over, demise and demolition ... it is a Manchester story that needs to be there. The Mather & Platt story, however, is far more than just a tale of technical progress or the acquisition of new markets - for in the course of its long history, the company acquired a tradition and an international reputation which could be counted amongst the biggest of its assets. As Professor Richard Pares once wrote, “Until we can quote histories of representative banks, steamship companies, jerry-builders, tea planters, wine merchants, servants, registries, coal miners and the like, we shall still be talking about the history of economic policy, not about economic history - a particularly bad mistake to make about a country like Great Britain, where the efforts of society have usually counted for so much and those of the rulers of society comparatively speaking, for so little.” 

Richard ParesA West Indian Fortune (1950),p. VII.


1914-1918   The Commemoration in 2014 - 2018     

  

     
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      (click on this image)

                                                                                                                        Mather & Platt at War

               The First World War 1914 - 1918, Park Works - 

The record of industrial production and general activities at Park Works is outlined elsewhere: looking at the story of the works in relation to the development of the company, it is clear that without a new site Mather & Platt Ltd. would have ceased both to expand and to adapt itself to the economic conditions of the twentieth century.

It is of interest to note that the most significant developments had taken place before 1914. By that time Park Works had taken on the shape that was to be its future and had employed new methods of production, which were not generally accepted until the First World War period.

At Newton Heath there was plenty of space for new development and the firm was even able to hand over four of its bays, 14, 15, 16 and 17, completed just before the War, to the manufacturers of Avro Aeroplanes, Messrs.A.V. Roe and Company, one of Britain’s early firms in the Aeronautical industry who were producing aircraft at a factory on an adjacent site.Trenches 1916. Image adapted. Original c. John Dacre.

The 1914-18 War left its mark on the development of the company and the demand for engineering products for the armed forces superseded peace time production.

In August 1915 Park Works was declared a controlled establishment under the Munitions of War Act, and there was a steady switch over to war production.

Large quantities of shell casing and fuses were turned out and a howitzer re-lining department was established. Main propelling motors for submarines, gear boxes and hull plates for tanks, generators for searchlight duties and a multitude of other munitions of war were all produced at Park Works, the total output of munitions of one kind and another making an impressive war effort.

Executive members of Mather & Platt - if not serving in the armed forces - served in high ranking positions with responsibility to the various government departments of wartime Britain. Men like John Wormald and John Taylor did much to enable Britain's war-effort not only in the different theatres of war but also in Britain, 'keeping the home fires burning'. Both were honoured after the War for their contributions.

Where is this now?This War Memorial was unveiled by the Dean of Manchester in the presence of the majority of the Directors of the company, many city dignitaries and almost the entire workforce of Mather & Platt.

               1921 - Extracted from the company Journal 

It was a solemn and moving ceremony for all who attended. In fact, as the Dean declared, he himself had lost a brother on the borders of India during the conflict and so was moved to say how deeply he empathised with those in the crowd who were related to the honoured names on the memorial.

Although he had been called upon to unveil many memorials since his arrival in Manchester, it was the first occasion that he had unveiled a memorial placed on business premises. He was glad to see one placed at Park Works since the recording of the names of those at Mather & Platt who had given their lives "would be preaching a sermon every day ... a sermon which would go to the hearts of all" as they picked up the pieces of working life and enjoyed the dignity of a hard-won freedom.

In his speech, he drew attention to a minority feeling that had become prevalent in the country that the money used in erecting such memorials would be better spent in providing better conditions and opportunities for the living. He himself believed, however, that the memorials were justified because they served as fitting tributes to those who had made the ultimate sacrifice in order that the living might have those opportunities to bring about such better conditions.

After a dedicatory prayer, three buglers sounded the Last Post which was followed by the singing of the hymn, "O God our help in ages past". The Dean then pronounced the Benediction after which came a period of silence until the buglers sounded Reveille and the huge crowd which had witnessed the ceremony dispersed.

During the Great War, Mather & Platt Ltd.was represented by men in all branches of the armed services and many women served as nurses and auxiliaries. The War Memorial bore the names of 175 men and that number made up some 14% of the 1230 men who joined up. Besides these, 251 men - near 20% - of those who joined up were wounded. The company took great care to get back as many as possible of the old employees who fought during the war. Those who were re-employed after demobilisation numbered 979, and over 800 were still in the works. Also taken on were 126 Mather & Platt men who had been disabled and also 120 disabled men who had not worked for the firm prior to the war. Thus, disabled men formed 8% of the total number of male employees after the war.

Image adapted from the private collection of John Dacre

              The Second World War 1939 - 1945, Park Works - 

The Second World War, like that of 1914-18, led to the firm being listed as a Government controlled enterprise. Its activities were varied. A portion of Park Works was laid out as a gun factory and the many new and unfamiliar products manufactured included special capstans for boom defence vessels, gun mountings for the Admiralty, Bofors predictors and rocket projectors, cordite rolling mills and machines for proofing the fabric of barrage balloons. There were few engineering firms in the country which could have rivalled this record of diversified production.

At the same time, there was a steady demand for standard peacetime products, often adapted to new uses. Many of the products of apparently routine work, familiar in days of peace, were earmarked for secret destinations and purposes. Thus we find that Mather & Platt high-pressure turbine pumps and motors were used for the "Pluto" scheme to pump oil through pipes under the English Channel to the Continent. Similar installations, totalling about 25,000 h.p. were parts of a system of underground pipelines from the principal British oil ports connecting to “Pluto” and to numerous airfields and bases scattered over the Britain. Made up into mobile units, Mather & Platt Ltd. pumps were used by the Services in all theatres of war. Image adapted from original WW2 postcard ((Japanese). c. 2002 David Drew-SmytheAt sea, low-voltage generators produced by the firm were used for the excitation of the coils for degaussing the ships to meet the menace of the magnetic mine, and motor-alternators were produced as part of radar and wireless equipment. Even a new and pre-eminently peace time development like the food machinery department was employed to meet service needs, producing canning equipment for cooking and packing service rations, "dehydration" plant, grain drying equipment and milk sterilisers. Some of the equipment and machinery was sent under contracts with the Ministry of Supply to the Soviet Union, thereby maintaining a link, which went back long before the days of war and revolution.

The impact of war on the employees of the Company had different consequences in 1914-18 and in 1939-45. In 1914 several of the firm's employees who were resident in enemy territory were interned in enemy countries while after a factory recruitment meeting there was an immediate rush of Park Works workers to join the armed forces. By contrast, the gradual and compulsory call up scheme and the system of reserved occupations which operated from the outbreak of hostilities in 1939 prevented a chaotic rush from industry, with the result that the firm retained most of its employees throughout the first year of the fighting. Women were drawn into the firm in larger numbers than ever before. Loris Mather, the Chairman, commented in 1942, “While many of these have had little training for the work on which they are now engaged, we are well satisfied with the way they tackle their jobs, and the energy and cheerfulness which they display."

Finally, whereas in 1914 recent additions to the Park Works buildings were handed over to Avro for the manufacture of aeroplanes, in 1939 all available plant including some recent extensions were urgently required for the firm's own needs. Indeed, by the end of the War in 1945, the workshops were seriously congested and the packed order book led to a search for new premises for the third time in the firm’s history. After negotiations with the Ministry of Supply, a ten year lease of the Royal Ordnance Factory at Radcliffe about ten miles North of Park Works, was arranged, thus providing the firm with an additional manufacturing space of about 30% of the area of Park Works, and accommodation for 800 to 1,000 additional workers. Although the post war years were to involve many problems of re-conversion in an awkward and unsettled period of economic history, the firm was expanding and again looking to the future.

Former employee, Tommy Walsh (see "The People Write" via Features Menu) writing before the site was demolished in the 1990s remembers Park Works in 1940 when "I used to pass it on the bus. "Britain At Work" painted by L. S. LowryAs a young man I was intrigued by the camouflage painted on the walls. Even to this day you can make out the doors and windows that were painted on the buildings to confuse the enemy. It was years later when it struck me that if the enemy was aware that our factories were camouflaged as houses, then houses would become legitimate targets. If our government saw it this way, I don't suppose we will ever know. The other thing that made me think later was that it must have been very good paint to last nearly sixty years in all sorts of weather.

There is a painting of the main entrance of Mather & Platt in the War Museum in London; painted in about 1940, I think, by L. S. Lowry. It depicts the match-like figures going through the main gate of the factory and the painting also shows barrage balloons in the background."  

                                                                                                  Factory workers going to work at the Mather & Platt, Manchester, in the snow  "Going to Work""              

Note

Laurence Stephen Lowry was born in Manchester in 1887.The theme of the industrial landscape first emerged in his work around 1915; at this time he had his first exhibition at Salford
art gallery. He lived in Pendlebury in Salford for 39 years, and worked as a Rent Collector and Clerk for the Pall Mall Company Ltd. in Manchester. The landscapes Lowry chose to record were very familiar to him as his position as Rent Collector and Clerk ensured that he had first-hand experience of many of the areas around Manchester.


1958 - The Jubilee book 1958       

               
The first draft of this history was written in 1953 the request of the then Chairman, Loris Emerson Mather, by a team from the company itself. This draft is dated 1958. It reflects the birth, growth and life of an extraordinary entity and is both comprehensive and clear in its scope. Very few companies in the world can boast of the existence of such a profound body of researched work dating back - as this does - to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in Britain. Almost fifty years have passed since this book was written. People and places are now gone. Mather & Platt no longer exists in Manchester; but the history of this remarkable company remains - rich, detailed and alive. It is reproduced here as a tribute to the company, incorporating some amendments based on new evidence of fact, to acknowledge the greater contributions of some other personalities in the company, and as a celebration of the work undertaken by the original writers. The book they wrote was never actually published, has been designed as an internet companion volume to The History of Mather & Platt Limited,  "Integrity and Industry".  Marcel Boschi's History of Mather & Platt Ltd. Which is a detailed text and photographic record of the compagnies, men and machines in this history. 


2005 - February
  
                                                                                            
                                                                                                                                "A TALE OF TAYLORS"  * 
                                                                                                           Rossendale - Bolton - Southport - Grasmere - Hale
                          
                                                                                                               1690 - 2005                                                    
 
  
                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     (click on)
   
 
                                                                                          This book is Dedicated to my Wife and Life time Consort Joan Margaret Taylor (Nee Gilman)
                                                                        Whose Support and Encouragement helped to make me What I am and this book possible together 
                                                                        we commit it to our three Sons Alastair, James and Edward for them to pass to our Grandchildren.
 
                                                                                                                                                                           John Frederick Taylor.
                                                                                                                                                                           February 2005

* This book is not for publication and is therefore private but Mr. John F. Taylor would reply personally to anyone seeking to have a copy,
 if they wrote to him personally about the book.

 For readers of the saga of Mather & Platt Ltd...


Mr John F.Taylor former director and executive officer of the company Mather & Platt Ltd evokes personal memories by bringing us his testimony for history. He was the third generation of his family to serve the company, being the grand-son of John Th.Taylor of Dowson, Taylor & Company Limited which joined with Messrs Mather and Platt a private firm to form in 1898 the public company of Mather & Platt Ltd

"I think it was 2002 when Marcel Boschi was over here and to meet me. I did download its book on Mather and Platt and the sprinkler history, which is about as actual as people are going to agree !! There will always be different nuances that some people would want to see inserted. I am not one for wanting to push our families position as it was very much a team success story.

 

However it was three generations of Taylors as you point out that built the Mather and Platt world wide reputation. My Grandfather gave the original foundation and with the work of John Wormald after the death of Ralph Dowson they built up a series of branch foreign offices and agents around the world. My father consolidated these into companies of substantial stature, the general engineering business followed particularly in France . South Africa, India, and Australia after the fire protection companies were successful.

 

My major contribution was at the time of the new FOC rules when fire risks were overwhelming the old sprinkler systems that were installed to the original rules that John Wormald and my Grandfather had originally written on a park bench one Sunday afternoon in Bolton.They were of course later refined to become the FOC rules used up until the 29th edition which was launched on the 12th October 1964. (My eldest son's Alastair, birthday) I remember seeing him for the first time at 6-00 am in the morning , catching the London train to attend and represent Mather and Platt at the official launch presentation by the FOC, and then back to see him again in the evening.I was 32 years of age then.

 

My responsibility at the time was for the special risks side of the business, that is anything that was not covered by the FOC rules. I was in charge and responsible for the fullscale tests in a whiskey warehouse of Ballentines in Dumbarton when we showed the Factory Mutual organization in the US that their requirements for whiskey warehouses were unnecessary. This resulted in a complete revision of the Factory Mutuals and Underwriters requirements in the US as well as setting a standard above the FOC rules in the UK. The date scheduled for the test was a date when I was to be on holiday in Sardinia, I had to fly back for a week leaving my young wife at the mercy of a week on her own with lots of handsome Italians around. She had a few interesting experiences !! These tests followed the large whiskey warehouse fire in Glasgow in about 1961 where several fireman lost their lives.

 

I and my team sorted out the high rise warehousing fire risk problems in foam rubber and polyurethane foams and carried-out extensive tests with the Michelin Tyre Company to solve their fire risk in the high stacking of rubber tyres up to 18 feet in height. On one of their tests we nearly burnt down an aircraft hanger we had hired for the test. It was insured by the Tarriff companies as their contribution to the tests. At the end Michelin equipped a new warehouse with our design of system at their plant in Clermont-Ferrand filled it with tyres and set light to it. The fire was extinguished after four hours without anyone having to go in and no damage was done to the fabric of the building except for the black soot deposits.These tests were witnessed by the Factory Mutuals and the US Underwriters resulted in their rewriting their standards for this type of risk.

 

 

In addition to this I was instrumental in Chairing the committee which wrote the rules for the Mather and Platt "Protectospray System" this system was of particular importance in the protection of oil refineries, oil platforms in the North Sea and chemical plant risks, as well as rocket launching pads.

 

I also worked closely with ICL and IBM in the development of computer graphics for sprinkler systems, until I had to give this up due to becoming the Managing director of the

Fire Engineering Division and therefore profit responsible for the whole of it's activities world wide.

 

At the time that Wormald Australia bought M&P, it was a great interrogation. But looking back, what had to be done to the Company was the need to break it up into it's different disciplines. I knew this at the time of the approach and as I was due to be next Chairman I didn't relish the idea of breaking down what my Grandfather had put together as I had so many trusted friends within the company who I felt relied on my loyalty and support.

 

I retired from M&P in July 1978 having served 26 years with the company and shortly before Sir William Mather who left in August the same year. After Wormald purchased M&P, it could no longer be my or Bill Mather's company and I didn't want to live in Australia where I would have had to live if I had stayed on".

 

John F. Taylor.2005.


2012 - May 3rd Tribute to David Drew-Smythe (1950 - 2012)

                                                                                      David Drew-Smythe died peacefully on May 3rd 2012 in Sydney, Australia, aged 61.                                                                          

                                                                                                                                  Galloping Fox Home Page

 
"In July of 2001, David Drew-Smythe was in the process of researching the Wormald branch of his family - his maternal grandmother, born in 1901, was the youngest daughter of Sir John and Lady Mab Wormald - when, quite by chance, he came  across a message on the internet from a man in Paris called Marcel André Boschi. He was requesting information about the old  British firm, Mather & Platt Ltd., of Manchester and was interested in researching and setting out the history of the company and  its principal Directors. Knowing Sir John Wormald's connection with M+P, David responded to the message.

 After initial uncertainties and a deal of linguistic juxtapositioning, a quantity of basic information was exchanged - corporate from   Marcel and family from David - and the first few experimental pages of the site came into existence.

 The site as it appears now is the result of much research and a shared journey of discovery, working in French and in English -  both spoken and written - via files, e-mails and telephone calls between Fontainebleau, where Marcel lives (when he is not  touring and playing a serious round of golf!) and Sydney, where David - a teacher and writer - is based.

 The resulting collaboration is perhaps one of the more extraordinary trans-global achievements of the 'cyber age' and is one that  validates completely the power of the internet to overcome 'the tyranny of distance' and to be used both as an information resource and as a business tool. More than that, however, it is evidence of a partnership that has succeeded in producing a social and historical document of striking importance. Put at its most basic level, without the contribution of the great men (and the women behind them) and the companies treated on this site, the world might still be drawing water in buckets, throwing glass balls at fires and generally peering out from the dark ages (no pun intended Messrs. Edison and Hopkinson) into an uncertain future.

Marcel Boschi's History of Mather & Platt Ltd.contains text and images from a number of sources and draws on the extensive Marcel's private collections and many people. All material on this site is copyright and may not be used in any other forum or context without permission being obtained in writing. Application should be made to Marcel Boschi for such permission. Much of the text has been edited and augmented by David Drew-Smythe and many of the images have been specially treated for the specific purpose of inclusion on this site.
http://home.zipworld.com.au/~lnbdds/Boschi/main2.htm

David was born in 1950 in Bristol and educated at Clifton College. A graduate of Exeter University (St. Luke's College), he is both a writer and a senior teacher. He currently works for the New South Wales Department of Education and Training in Sydney. He is a Drama and Technology specialist and was, for several years, Head of English at Belmont, The Mill Hill Junior School, in North London.

As a writer - his maternal grandfather's sister was Joyce Anstruther (Jan Struther) who wrote the classic "Mrs. Miniver" - he holds the distinction of having (in 1999) had a play - a Ballad Opera - produced at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London ("The Ballad of Salomon Pavey", co-written with Jeremy James Taylor) which was staged as the opening production for that theatre's 'Globe 400' Education Season. David is also a published and recorded poet.

In addition to his work within the N.S.W. Department of Education, he is currently involved with a number of freelance writing, development and research projects. For 2002 and 2003, he was the recipient of a Merit Award from the International Society of Poets in America; his work has been produced in book anthologies and on CD by that organisation. Recently (November 2004) a short story titled The Farmer's Daughter, was published in the United States as part of an anthology by The Fiction Works (Bell Ringer Series - "Tell Me of Love" volume) - a project designed for the Literacy and Language markets. The anthology is available for world-wide distribution in simultaneous printed book, e-book and audio formats - the latter as a dramatised version. Due for publication by The Fiction Works in 2005, will be David's most recent project. "The Private E-mails of William Shakespeare".

Unlike a published book, however, the nature of a web site is that it is constantly changing and can be changed within a matter of seconds, to update, correct or re-design material as often as necessary or as expedient. This site will continue to change and develop and, even if a book does eventuate - as is currently projected - this work will continue to be in the public domain as a testament to a corporate story that, in effect, began more than two hundred years ago".

2012 - David Drew-Smythe Biography

                                                                                                                                -   FRANCE  -                                  

  

Paris, Tour Eiffel, Lieux D'Intérêt

                                                                                   

               Mather & Platt  S.A.

                    Head Office

               9, avenue  Bugeaud

                   75116 PARIS    


                                                                                             S. A. Mather & Platt France

S.A. Mather & Platt Front Page
Paris Headquarters
 
S.A Mather & Platt FRANCE
Fire Engineering, Park Works, 59100 ROUBAIX
Food Machinery, Atelier de l'Eau Blanche, Route de Rosporden, 29000 QUIMPER        

     

1884 - Année de l'arrivée du sprinkler "GRINNELL" en France.                   

C'est au début de l'année 1884 que Messieurs Mather & Platt réalisèrent en France à Roubaix, la première installation de sprinkler « Grinnell », dans la célèbre filature de coton de Messieurs Motte-Bossut Fils, devenue aujourd'hui "Le centre des Archives nationales du monde du travail". Au mois de septembre de la même année fut éteint le premier incendie en France, par deux têtes de sprinkler "Grinnell" dans la salle des batteurs.de cette importante usine textile. Voici un extrait de la lettre reçue du propriétaire :

" Par suite de la présence d'une pierre dans notre ouvreuse verticale, le feu prit au coton contenu dans ce batteur et se communiqua immédiatement au dépôt essentiellement inflammable de coton ouvert déjà et se trouvant à l'avant de cette machine. Avant que les ouvriers n'aient eu le temps de se servir de leurs tuyaux d'incendie, deux appareils sur huit installés dans cette petite salle, entrèrent en fonction et réduisirent les dégâts sans autre secours, à une valeur de quelques francs".     

                                                                      

 
                                                                                                                                                                                                (click on)            
                                          Entrée de la Filature Motte-Bossut Fils à Roubaix, elle abrite aujourd'hui  Le "Centre des Archives nationales du monde du travail"


En septembre 1884 a
u second étage de l'immeuble dans la petite salle des batteurs, la présence d'une pierre dans l'ouvreuse verticale mit le feu  au contenu de ce batteur deux sprinklers sur huit installés en début d'année s'ouvrirent, ce fut  en France 
la  première extinction d'incendie par deux sprinklers 
"Grinnell".

                                                                                                                  
                       (click on) 
  Salle des batteurs d'une Filature de coton  française



1921 -  British Chairmen of the French Company


Mather & Platt Ltd. had been trading in France via agencies (Sydney Potter is recorded as the company's General Agent in 1908, 65, rue Saint-Lazare, 75009 PARIS. In 1910, 22, rue de Douai, 75009 PARIS and by its own endeavours but, it was not until 1921, that a fully-fledged company was incorporated in Head Office was set up in Paris - 179, rue de la Pompe 75116 PARISlater 9, Avenue Bugeaud 75116 PARIS.and finally with Mr. Eustace Balfour, as last British president, 29; avenue Georges Politzer, 78183 TRAPPES. 

The Fire Engineering Division at Roubaix - Park Works- 59100 ROUBAIX in the north of France and the Food Machinery works at Quimper - Atelier de l'Eau Blanche, Route de Rosporden, 29000 QUIMPER, situated about 300 miles west of Paris, overlooking the wild Atlantic Ocean. There was also a small workshop and stores in Marseille

The first S.A. Mather & Platt Chairman - appointed when the company was incorporated - was Sir John Wormald. He served from December 1921 until September 1924. The early twenties were difficult years for industry - in France as much as in Britain. The post-war period brought with it a new set of challenges and a labour force, in both countries, ready for change. By this stage in his life John Wormald was 62 and approaching well-deserved retirement. He stepped down as Chairman in France when he turned 65 and was followed in September 1924 by Loris Emerson Mather, the son of the original Mather (Sir William) - co-founder of the 1899 public company in Britain. John Wormald died in 1933.

1910 Firedoor advertised through S.D. Potter's Paris Agency

 Once launched, the company continued to trade successfully up to (and after) the Second World War. Its wartime experiences will be treated in a separate section at a later date. After the war business restructuring took place and life, trade and fortune took a turn for the better. The company's history was next punctuated by the global take-over by the Australian born, Wormald International, at which point its name was changed to M+P Wormald. After Tyco acquired Wormald in 1990, the prestigious Mather & Platt branding was retained and is now very much prized under the Tyco banner - and the company is still as vibrant and robust as ever it was.
Click here Back to access a picture (with names) of S.A. Mather & Platt Executive personnel who attended a luncheon at the Café de la Paix in 1922. Here also is to be found a summary of the speeches made.

Loris Mather became Chairman of Mather & Platt Ltd. in Britain shortly before the end of World War 1. He became the longest serving British Chairman of the French company and, although he resigned in France in 1950, he remained as Chairman of the parent company and always kept an avuncular eye on France


.
                                                                                                                             Legendary Herbert G. North 
                                                                                                                              Président-Directeur Général  

Also a Chairman of
S.A. Mather & Platt
France


      Herbert North                                                        

From the archives ...

From January 1950 - May 1955, Herbert North was the Chairman. He was followed by Eustace Balfour who was the son of the British politician. He was the last British-born President, Director-General of S.A. Mather & Platt in France. He was also a man who served the company for a long time - 22 years in all from 1956 until 1978 when Wormald-International acquired global control of Mather & Platt. At this time he was given early retirement in 1978 - still a comparatively young man to face such a prospect, as were several others at that point. 

Eustace Balfour - son of the British politician. 
   President  Eustace Balfour     
                          
The French company was very soon changed in 1978 to Mather+Platt Wormald. The Wormald element stemmed, ironically, from two of Sir John Wormald's own Brothers who had set up - with his guidance - a similar company in Australia during the first decade of the century. The venture was originally called Wormald Brothers.. 

Baron François Roissard de Bellet                             

François was Secretary to S.A. Mather & Platt and retired in March 1954, when this group photograph was taken and had, by then, been associated with the company for over forty-four years. His health, at this time, was not the best. His friends in Paris were anxious, therefore, that his leave-taking should not be entirely 'official'; but it was not until May of that year that he was well enough to attend a small ceremony held in his honour. On May 19th, he received a long-service medal issued by the French Ministry of Labour and was presented with a chiming clock from the firm in recognition of his long and faithful service. Mr. J. D. Paybody and Mr. George Roberts were in Paris at the time and represented Park Works, Manchester at the ceremony.


                                                                         Lucien Woindrich - 50 Years Service to M&P France

Lucien Woindrich was born in 1901,at Héricourt (Haute-Saône) in the Franche-Comté region of France. Héricourt was a significant centre for the cotton industry. He began working at Mather & Platt in 1916, at the age of 15, and began his career as an apprentice as did his long time friend, Ernest Boschi, just a few years later.

He worked his way up through the company and very quickly became Manager of the Sprinkler Division of Fire Engineering. Marcel Boschi, Ernest's son, remembers him as almost a member of the family. Marcel's four uncles worked under Lucien Woindrich and it was Woindrich himself who encouraged Ernest to accept Loris Mather's invitation to make a study trip to Manchester and to the British factories of M&P in 1951. Loris Mather was Chairman of Mather & Platt in Britain at that time.

Lucien Woindrich was a well-informed and highly-qualified man who took the time to listen to his workers. Respected for for his courtesy and for his diplomatic skills, he was an expert in industrial relations. In 1954 he was appointed to a seat on the Board - a seat he held until his retirement in 1966 after a career spanning some fifty years.



S. A. Mather & Platt - Paris
Office Staff, 1954

Directors - first row seated - right to left
 
Lucien Woindrich
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
Directeur de la division Sprinkler. Fire Engineering
 
René Legrand
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
Directeur de la division Food Machinery
 
Baron François de Bellet
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
Secrétaire Général
 
Herbert North
Président-Directeur-Général
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
 
Jean Pirie
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
 
Jean Mignot
Administrateur de la S.A. Mather & Platt
Directeur de la division special hazards de la Fire Engineering
(risques spéciaux - Mulsifyre, Protecto-spray, etc)
2nd Row right to left (standing #3)
Daniel MignotFire Engineering Drawings
 
3rd. Row right to left (standing #8)
Melle. LasalleHerbert North's secretary
 
Seated left of Lucien Woindrich
Melle. DejoieChef Comptable
Back Row right to left (standing #8)
Henri Chevalley, Fire Engineering Drawings

 
                 Société Anonyme Mather & Platt   
  .       Division machines pour l'agroalimentaire

                            - Usine de Quimper -

Atelier de l'Eau Blanche, Route de Rosporden 29000 QUIMPER

                              ____________________  

Before the War, a useful trade had been carried on in Europe. This was done partially by export, and partially by local manufacture. In France, Brittany was the main centre of vegetable and fish canning and in this area S.A. Mather & Platt had made arrangements with a local firm at Quimper, Establissements Jean Louarn, to manufacture any Food Machinery which, for various reasons could not be imported. Similarly, in Belgium, an arrangement was made with the firm of Edouard Lecluyse in Antwerp, and Food Machinery of Mather & Platt design was manufactured in both Factories for sale in Europe.

During the War, when all trade with Europe ceased, the French Company had to fall back on its own resources and in order to continue the Food Machinery business, made arrangements to finance Jean Louarn so as to expand his Works and manufacture machines which had previously been imported from England, and others which were developed in France during the course of the War. This initiative on the part of the French Staff not only kept the business alive, but resulted in a healthy expansion after the war was over.

The range of Food Machinery manufactured by Mather & Platt Ltd, included not only machines for Canning, but also machines for general food purposes such as Root Vegetable and other Washers, Food Pumps, Grain Dryers and Glass Jar Dryers, Peelers for all types of fruit and vegetables, Graders by size, weight or specific gravity, many forms of Cutters, Choppers, Dicers and Slicers, Filling and Inspection Tables and Conveyers which handle a great variety of items.

The M & P designed Pea Viner, embodying several new features, and having a higher throughput than competitive models, found ready markets, several hundreds being sold at home and overseas.

A Mather & Platt Canning Line is fully automatic, and processing times and temperatures can be controlled by the operation of instruments alone. A good example is the Pea Line. The Pea Vine is reaped in the field and loaded automatically onto a Trailer. It is then tipped alongside the Viner into which it is fed. with pitch forks. The shelled peas are delivered from one side of the Viner at the rate of about 30 cwts per hour and the waste vine is carried away on a Conveyor to be made into silage. The peas are then elevated into the Winnower, which cleans them, gravitate through a Washer and are pumped to the Grader and again to the next process of Blanching. Here the intercellular gases are driven out, surface infections are removed and the peas are thoroughly cleaned. They are then cooled and washed again, passing over a Picking Table where they are visually inspected for the removal of sub-standard peas. They are then washed again, pass through a machine to remove splits and skins, elevated to a Hopper, from which they gravitate to the Filler and then into the can together with a measured quantity of brine. The filled cans then pass through an Exhauster system which, by heating the can and its contents, drives off the air and ensures a good vacuum in the can after the next process of seaming on the lids. The closed cans then travel through an automatic Pressure Cooker and Cooler from where they roll away to be labelled and cased, or stored. Similar lines are made for handling other Vegetables, Fruits and Fish while specialised machines can be incorporated in the Lines to adapt them for Soup, Milk or Meat.

Throughout the whole of this process, no part of the pea or pea vine need be touched by hand, and the peas are usually in labelled cans, graded according to size, and cooked within four hours of the pea vine being reaped. An automatic line of this description can handle two hundred cans a minute with very little labour, and under complete and automatic process control. This chain of processes would amaze a housewife, and surprise an early pioneer like Appert. It is an excellent example of a revolution in the consumer industry, which has revealed yet again the close connection between technical invention and business enterprise.

M&P France - Food Machinery production


India - Cup Dispension & Cleaning Machine

Before the war, a useful trade had been carried on in Europe. This was done partially by export, and partially by local manufacture. In France, Brittany was the main centre of vegetable and fish canning and in this area S.A. MATHER & PLATT (France) had made arrangements with a local firm at QUIMPER (Finistère), Etablissements Jean LOUARN, to manufacture any Food Machinery which, for various reasons, could not be imported. Similarly, in Belgium, an arrangement was made with the firm of Edouard LECLUYSE in ANTWERP, and Food Machinery of Mather & Platt design was manufactured in both Factories for sale. .

                     Engineering Hub - links to other divisions Engineering Hub in Europe.


    Quimper's Factory 

             Société Anonyme Mather & Platt 
         Division protection générale incendie
                   
                (Fire Engineering, Park Works) 
                      - Usines  de Roubaix - 

25 bis, rue Rollin 59100 ROUBAIX 

  ____________________      
Ernest Boschi  - adapted from photograph c.1935The Arms of Fraize

Ernest Boschi
Manager of the French factories Mather & Platt S.A., Fire engineering.

He was born at Fraize (Vosges) France, in 5th June 1903, he joined the company on the 12th November, 1920 bringing with him all the ambition and energy of youth - determined to work hard to enhance his career and to promote the success of Mather & Platt in France - to which end he eventually devoted his whole working life.

When Ernest Boschi was recruited in 1920, Loris Emerson Mather was Chairman of Mather & Platt Ltd. in Manchester, whilst Sydney Potter was M&P's General Agent in France. In 1921, however, the new French company S.A. Mather & Platt was formed with Sir John Wormald becoming its first Chairman and Sydney Potter the Managing Director.

He served with field construction units and in many other capacities both in the Fire Protection and Sprinkler sections of Mather & Platt. After that he was sent to North Africa to take up a post of responsibility wherin he had to develop and install fire protection sprinkler systems, principally for the flour milling industry.     

 He returned to Metropolitan France to take up new responsibilities within the company, becoming involved in a variety of industrial departments - still working on sprinkler systems and concentrating on development and installation. He worked his way up through the company until, in 1931, he was appointed Manager (by Sydney D. Potter, the company General Manager) taking over from Robert Hilton who had been the Manager since 1925 at the company's factories at Roubaix Ernest Boschi (1903-1964) has had a long association, he was been during 33 years in Roubaix, manager of the factories Mather & Platt S.A., Fire engineering. His career began with the company in 1920 and lasted until his death, in 1964.

Fidex Sprinkler Head 1946

As Manager, his first goal was to modernise the factory and to equip it with new technologies capable of producing the necessary up-to-date plant for the installation of sprinkler systems - pipes, valves, pressure tanks, sprinkler-heads, coupling joints, hangers, hydrants - as well as maintenance supplies for this fire protection equipment. He also concerned himself with the improvement of working conditions and conditions of service within the factory itself..

Fire Door  - made at Roubaix.After the end of the Second World War, in 1946, he launched the company into the manufacture of sprinkler heads - developing in close co-operation with Alfred Hudson (an English engineer from Mather & Platt - Manchester) the Fidex sprinkler model which had been made in England under the name of Titan, by J H Lynde and George Mills of Radcliffe.

Writing in 1923, Sir John Wormald, Chairman of S.A. Mather & Platt, France stated, "The "Simplex" Sprinkler had been superceded by the Grinnell when Dowson & Taylor joined forces with Mather & Platt early in 1888, but the "Witter" and the "Titan" Sprinklers, in considerably modified forms remained on the market with other devices of later date." Once production of the Fidex had started in France, "Grinnell" sprinkler heads were no longer imported from Manchester. The sprinkler Fidex model was made exclusively in Roubaix and in Japan.

In 1947 Ernest Boschi set in motion an upgrade of factory buildings whilst also developing new production lines for the prefabrication of pipes and couplings for sprinkler installations. In 1948 he also equipped the factory for the production of armoured fire-doors.

Ernest Boschi continued to serve as Manager and brought to the company the positive qualities of a self made-man. He had a hard-headed business sense, a determination to get the best out of himself and those about him and he was possessed of a great energy. He communicated his enthusiasm to his team, his family and to many others so that in his time he became a central figure.


Mather & Platt S.A. Fire Engineering
In 1883 - Mr. (later Sir) William Mather, while on a visit to the United States, secured the sole rights to market the Grinnell automatic sprinklers in all parts of the world except U.S.A. and Canada. With his friendship and association with John Wormald who had joined Dowson, Taylor & Co Limited. from the insurance industry, Mather & Platt Ltd. used this event to mark the beginning of yet another side of the firm's activities - one which was to leave a lasting legacy to the history of Fire Protection ...
Sprinkler Division M+P
Sprinkler
Mulsifyre M+P
Mulsifyre
Protectospray M+P
Protectospray
Hydrants M+P
Hydrant
Armoured Fire Doors M+P
Armoured Fire Doors
  Promotional material - also showing the layout of M&P Roubaix

                                                                                                  Extincteur chimique portatif contre l'incendie "Le Simplex" 



 
1899 - LA FILATURE DE FRAIZE (Vosges) - France - "Historique extrait des Archives départementales des Vosges" *

"Historique Nicolas Géliot, industriel originaire de Bourgogne, s’installe en 1835 à Plainfaing pour y fonder un petit empire industriel textile dans la Haute-Vallée de la Meurthe. Il fait l’acquisition du vieux moulin d’Habeaurupt pour installer sa toute première filature à force hydraulique. L’usine est officiellement mise en route en 1837. En 1849, Nicolas Géliot rachète la papéterie de Plainfaing qu’il transforme en filature, entreprend la construction du tissage de la Croix des Zelles, puis achète en 1855 les tissages de Noirgoutte, situés tous deux à Plainfaing. L’extension des établissements N. Géliot et fils se poursuit en direction de Fraize. L’industriel fait construire à Fraize en 1857 une nouvelle usine, qu’il équipe avec d’importantes machines fournies entre autres par la maison André Kœchlin de Mulhouse. Il introduit en 1860 la machine à vapeur en complément de la force hydraulique existante. L’ensemble de ces machines comprend une ouvreuse, plusieurs batteurs, des cardes, des bancs d’étirage, des bancs à broches et des renvideurs mécaniques. Nicolas Géliot décède le 5 août 1873 à Plainfaing. La succession des établissements est assurée par son épouse, Marie-Rose Deparis, ses enfants Henri, Adrien, Louis et Marie-Berthe Géliot et par son gendre Émile Gillotin, qui devient le directeur général de la firme. La société N. Géliot et fils est donc créée en 1874. En 1873, le tissage de Noirgoutte est entièrement dévasté par un incendie. Il est en totalité reconstruit. En 1874, le tissage de la Truche de Plainfaing vient se rajouter à la firme Géliot. Ce tissage fut créé en 1847 par P. Dollfus. Le développement continue avec l’acquisition, en 1883 du tissage des Graviers de Plainfaing ; le tissage de la Croix des Zelles est agrandi et celui d’Habeaurupt modernisé en 1888. En 1889, après la suppression du libre-échange, la firme Géliot monte véritablement en puissance. La manufacture des Aulnes de Fraize est ainsi créée et officiellement mise en action en 1891. Elle comprend 458 métiers de 58 000 broches et deux machines à vapeur. Le rachat des tissages de Saulcy-sur-Meurthe en 1894 propulse la firme Géliot aux premiers rangs des firmes textiles des Vosges". 

La Filature de Fraize, outil de travail modèle et exemplaire, datant du XXème siècle, n'existe plus aujourd'hui, elle a été détruite en juin 1989 par choix pour en faire une prairie, la transmission de sa mémoire culturelle atteinte en plein coeur s'est interrompue dans la vallée de la Haute-Meurthe. 
  
La découverte il y a quelques années d'un rapport établi vers 1930 par Monsieur Raymond Meyer, nous fait revivre les grands moments de la filature à travers un bel exemple de la transmission de la mémoire du patrimoine culturel. 

 Sources : 

 * 

  1. Fonds de la filature Géliot (XXe s.).pdf

 Archives départementales des Vosges Histoire de Fraize - La Costelle - L'industrie Cotonnière (pages 258 à 268)

          (click on)                                                                      LA FILATURE DE FRAIZE (Vosges) - France -

                                                                                                                           1899 - 1989

                                     

Rapport de Monsieur  Raymond MEYER
Ecole Supérieure des Sciences. Economiques et Commerciales de Paris, vers 1930
 

"L’installation d’une usine importante sur les terrains de l’ancienne usine brulée, dont la superficie se limitait à cette époque à 86 ares 80, serrés entre le cours de la Meurthe et les constructions de l’agglomération centrale de Fraize, imposait en 1900 la solution d’une filature à étages.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Photos Fil Fraize                                                                                                                  

    (click on this image)

Cette solution était d’ailleurs toute indiquée pour le travail spécial des cotons Jumel auquel cette usine était destinée, le bâtiment à étages dans sa conception moderne des grandes filatures anglaises ayant été poussée à une grande perfection.

L’ensemble réalisé sur le lieu de l’ancienne filature de 1900 à 1914 était d’une conception parfaite, moderne, poussée jusqu’à l’extrême pour utiliser toute la place disponible et la réserver à la fabrication. L’agrandissement de cette filature au moment de la reconstruction après la guerre posait donc avant tout le problème de l’élargissement des terrains ; il reçu une solution heureuse par la déviation du cours de la Meurthe, ce qui porta l’étendue de la propriété à plus de 2 ha 1/2 d’un seul tenant.

Les terrains nécessaires avaient été acquis progressivement depuis plusieurs années avec une grande prévoyance dans ce but.

Grâce à cette réalisation, la filature de Fraize put être porté à son importance actuelle par la construction d’une aile nouvelle et toutes ses dépendances purent être élargies et modernisées.

La surface totale d’utilisation donnée par les bâtiments, comptée bien entendu en additionnant la surface des étages et du sous-sol, atteint actuellement 25 220 m2 environs. Ces dernières sont exécutées entièrement en maçonnerie massive de moellons et angles de granit avec colonnes en fonte supportant des poutrages très solides en fer.

Les plates-formes des étages sont en béton de ciment, recouverts seulement dans certaines salles de planchers de bois et parquets de chêne, suivant la destination et l’utilité du travail.

De larges baies vitrées répandent la lumière à profusion dans ces grandes salles carrées, dont les plus importantes ont dans l’ancien bâtiment près de 50m sur 40m soit une surface de 2000 m2 environ.Enfin la couverture des bâtiments principaux a été conçue et réalisée de la façon la plus parfaite par 2 plates-formes de béton de ciment,entre fers, séparées par une couche élastique pour éviter toute trépidation du béton supérieur, qui forme une cuvette recouverte d’asphalte,contenant de l’eau ; ce joli bassin est alimenté en tout temps soit par la pluie, soit par les trop pleins des pompes du fonctionnement de l’usine.

Cette couverture réalise l’idéal d’un toit de filature subissant le moins de variations de températures, tenant le plus chaud en hiver et le plus frais en été, assurant aux salles qu’il recouvre la possibilité de régler plus facilement leur état hygrométrique ; elle n’a que l’inconvénient de coûter très cher.

Une tour de 30 m de hauteur, dominant tous les bâtiments, renferme un monte charges et un escalier d’accés aux étages ; elle abrite aussi à sa partie supérieur un grand réservoir d’alimentation des installations de Grinnell, (par Mather & Platt Ltd.) avec une première réserve d’eau de 35 000 litres.

Pour les nouveaux bâtiments construits en 1920 après la guerre (1914-1918), on a adopté le même genre de construction dans la mesure du possible : mêmes murs en maçonnerie avec moellons et angles de granit, mêmes baies vitrées.

Mais les colonnes en fonte et les gros poutrages en fer ayant été introuvables à cette période de la reconstruction, on a dû avoir recours pour ces bâtiments au ciment armé.

Le toit a dû être exécuté en ciment volcanique avec une couche de sable remplaçant la nappe d’eau.

La valeur de cette couverture est inférieure à celle de la première, mais elle est suffisante, surtout pour la salle de retordages qui a été disposée à l’étage de ce bâtiment, cette opération étant beaucoup mois délicate au point de vue de la régularité des conditions de température et d’hygrométrie que la filature de Jumel elle-même.

A la filature de Fraize, l’installation de force motrice, vapeur de 1900 a été maintenue, car elle est encore des plus modernes, comportant

 

                                                                        

                        Chaufferie :

1 batterie de 4 chaudières semi-tubulaires de 180 m2 de surface de chauffe timbre (12 kg). (S.A.C.M.)

4 surchauffeurs Schwoerrer portant la vapeur à 300° C

1 Réchauffeur Green de 320 tubes pour l’eau d’alimentation.

Les chaudières sont en sous sol et le charbon descend au déchargement par de grandes trémies jusque devant les foyers.

Un grand parc à houille longeant toute la cour contient la réserve de combustibles ; il est en communication avec les chaudières par une galerie souterraine à plan incliné.

Machine à vapeur : "triplex" de 1200 C.V. (S.A.C.M.) avec distribution par obturateur.

Reste en parfait état d’entretien, elle donne un excellent rendement.

La machine à vapeur attaque directement tous les étages de l’ancien bâtiment par son volant de 5 m 50 de diamètre, au moyen de 32 câbles en coton et en chanvre se répartissant sur les commandes des différentes salles.

A côté de ce à moteur à vapeur est accouplées avec lui, au moyen d’une transmission à câbles, 2 turbines hydrauliques (J.J. Rieter & Wintherthur) installées en 1914 peuvent fournir un appoint de force de 300 C.V. au maximum, cette force étant généralement moindre, puisque proportionnée au débit de la riviére.

Ces turbines ont été maintenues dans leurs dispositions premières, attaquant directement la transmission, mais une ancienne roue d’eau, dont nous avons parlé dans le chapitre "reconstitution" a été remplacée par un nouveau groupe de turbines Singren (Constructions Electriques de France) constituant avec leur alternateur accouplé directement sur arbre, la station hydro-électrique de Fraize.

Le local de cette dernière a été réuni avec celui des turbines Rieter pour la simplification des services.

Les installations de chauffage, de ventilation et d’humidification des salles ont été tout particulièrement étudiées dans cette filature de fin où les conditions hygrométriques jouent un grand rôle.

Les chauffages à vapeur avec retour d’eau aux chaudières, ont été installées par la Société des forges d’Audincourt et dans les nouveaux bâtiments par le S.A.C.M. de Mulhouse.

Dans les salles de peignage et des continus à filer, où il faut beaucoup d’humidité, la Société Lyonnaise de Ventilation Industrielle, à Lyon et à Neuilly / Seine a installé une série de "climatogènes" de même type que celle de la filature des Aulnes. Les autres salles disposant d’une ventilation centrale importante combinée avec humidificateur ( Système Farcot).

                                               

            Protection incendie par sprinkleur, système "Grinnell", installée par la S.A. Mather & Platt.
  
Une installation d'extincteurs automatiques contre l'incendie, système "Grinnell", comportant une cloche d'alarme incendie, protège l'ensemble du bâtiment principal ainsi que les magasins de coton ; 2.179 têtes d'extincteurs "Grinnell" sous pression d'eau de 8 bars sont installés dans ces locaux. En période de gel, l'installation de sprinkleurs des magasins de balles de coton est protégée de la gelée par un système de mise sous pression d'air, alternative au rythme des saisons. L'alimentation de l'installation est assurée par deux sources d'eau, la source "A" est constituée par un réservoir élevé situé en haut de la tour, elle fournit la première réserve d'eau nécessaire, la source "B" est une puissante pompe à vapeur, à double cylindres fabriquée par Mather & Platt Ltd. dans ses usines de Manchester en 1900. Elle fût remplacée le 26 Avril 1951, par un groupe électro-pompe à démarrage automatique, offrant un débit horaire de 180 m/h et une pression de 8 bars, capable d'arroser les surfaces impliquées en cas d'incendie dans un rapport débit/pression répondant aux normes minimales au m2, exigées des sociétés d'assurances contre l'incendie.
(Pour faire fonctionner la pompe cliquer sur le lien ci-contre  et mettre en plein écran).  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mdo2WvgZH8

Pour assurer le service entre les étages, 2 ascenseurs d’une force de 2 000 et 1 000 kg sont disposés dans la tour de l’ancien bâtiment.                        
 
La filature de Fraize ne travaille pas que les cotons longues soies, en particulier les cotons d’Egypte ; et comme nous l’avons dit à propos de la matière première, chaque fois que l’opportunité s’en présente, on utilise les cotons coloniaux en particulier d’Algérie. La moitié des assortiments sont en peigné , l’autre moitié en cardé.

Cette filature a de plus un important retordage et des ateliers complets de finissage.

Le dévidage, le gazage et le mercerisage sont installés dans des salles spéciales du sous-sol, qui constituent d’ailleurs un véritable étage supplémentaire où se font toutes les manipulations de la réception des filés dans une cave humide disposée à cet effet.

Tout est conçu pour réaliser un enchaînement régulier, méthodique et commode des opérations sans transport inutiles. On peut suivre ces manipulations successives sur les plans.

Aux magasins de balles de coton qui sont à quais, les balles sont manipulées au moyen de ponts roulants électriques. Une voie aérienne Trolley, système Tourtellier comme aux Aulnes, va des magasins à la salle de mélange, au premier étage, grâce à un raccordement avec un ascenseur spécial, pour les balles de coton. La même voie Tourtelier existe dans la salle de mélanges autour du brise balles et les balles sont dirigées par l’ouvrier du mélange vers la place précise où il les désire.

Le brise-balles alimente 8 gros casiers de mélanges.

Les chargeuses automatiques et les ouvreuses préliminaires se trouvent entre ces casiers et le coton travaillé par ces machines descend automatiquement sur les ouvreuses, au rez-de chaussée. La salle des batteurs alimente directement celles des cardes , les rouleaux étant transportés par un monorail flexible pouvant passer entre les rangées de machines.

Les opérations successives s’enchaînent pour le cardé comme pour le peigné et vers les bancs enfin inclus au rez-de chaussée d’où leurs bobines montent directement par l’ascenseur central à destination.

Tous les bancs à broche surfins alimentant les continus sont au premier étage avec ceux-ci. Le retordage avec ses bobinoirs est au premier étage du nouveau bâtiment, les renvideurs enfin occupent les deux étages supérieurs de l’ancienne usine.

Tous les filés sont descendus par le monte-charge central qui débouche devant la cave humide, où ils passent tous pour entrer ensuite à la réception et à l’encaissage, qui est installé tout le long des fenêtres du sous-sol, dans une partie très bien éclairée ; l’encaissage communique avec le magasin de caisses et la salle de départ ou d’expédition d’une part, avec les ateliers de dévidage, gazage et mercerisage d’autre part.

Les expéditions préparées d’avance dans la salle de départ soit en caisses, soit en ballots, sont enlevées à de plein pied à par les camions qui descendent devant le quai d’embarquement, semblable à celui des Aulnes.

Tous les déchets de la préparation sont récupérés sur place et descendent par des trémies ou trappes au sous-sol, d’où ils sont dirigés vers les magasins , au moyen d’un chariot spécial aux anciens magasins."

          Textes extraits du rapport de Raymond. MEYER
          Ecole Supérieure des Sciences. Economiques et Commerciales de Paris, vers 1930
                                                                             
                                                                                           - UNITED KINGDOM -
 
                                                                                                            Résultat de recherche d'images pour "l'angleterre"


                    Mather & Platt Limited                               Park WorksGrimshaw Lane, Manchester Lancashire M40 2WL                             United Kingdom
1888 - The Story of Dowson, Taylor & C° Limited   

Ralph Dowson, John Taylor and William Mather formed the original partnership, and later the enterprise which provided the future public company, Mather & Platt Ltd., with the basis of one of its most innovative and successful departments - the Fire Engineering Department.                                                                                                                                                   

The early entreprise and dogged determination of these two men brought about the eventual restructuring of the Mather & Platt partnership and, as a result, the core business of  the new  company was modified to exploit the rapidly  growing demand for fire fighting and protection equipment on a global basis.                                                                                                       

It was in 1883 after Parmelee had given his first demonstration, in Bolton, That William Mather made the visit to America, to which reference is made elsewhere and brought back from the United States, the world selling rights, apart from North America, for an automatic sprinkler called “Grinnell”. No sooner had John Taylor studied the mechanism of the “Grinnell” head and seen it tested under fire conditions, that he knew it to be the best sprinkler yet invented. Mather and Platt started to sell the “Grinnell” sprinkler and there was fierce competition between the two firms. John Taylor had invented and patented a sprinkler alarm valve which was by far and away better than anything else made at the time.So here we had two firms in competition both having the best designed working parts of a sprinkler system. Some-how the two inventions had to be brought together.

At this point another important person comes on the scene. John Wormald who at the time was the surveyor for the Bolton Mutual Insurance Corporation and who had written and had published the first set of rules for the installation of sprinklers  He had done this for the Bolton Mutual Insurance Corporation who were to offer discounts on fire insurance premiums for buildings protected by automatic sprinklers installed to their rules. Bolton Mutual’s decision to grant discounts for properly installed sprinkler systems was so successful that the larger fire insurance companies soon followed and so a means to incentivise factory owners to install automatic fire sprinkler systems was established. John Wormald was of course well known to John Taylor who had assisted him in drafting the rules one Sunday afternoon on a park bench in Bolton, he was also known to William Mather. John Wormald saw the fierce competition between Mather and Platt and Dowson and Taylor and appreciated that each owned the best products for a sprinkler system but that neither had the use of each other’s products.

John Wormald knew that John Taylor would like to have available to his firm the “Grinnell” sprinkler he also knew that William Mather would like to have available the Taylor patented alarm valve. However Ralph Dowson was a formidable salesman and Mather’s sprinkler department were finding it difficult to over come the Dowson and Taylor competition. The first step to solve this, was an agreement in 1887 where Mather & Platt agreed to sell “Grinnell” sprinklers to Dowson and Taylor. This arrangement was so successful that John Wormald suggested to both John Taylor and William Mather that the two firms should come together and combine their activities and that in the event that this could be agreed that he would leave the Bolton Mutual Insurance Corporation and join the new combined enterprise to promote automatic sprinkler systems on a national scale.

On the 10th May 1888 John Wormald’s efforts  were rewarded and Mather and Platt and Dowson and Taylor signed an agreement for a new company called Dowson, Taylor and Co. Limited to be formed with Ralph Dowson, John Taylor, and John Wormald as Managing Directors and William Mather as non-executive Chairman and John Platt a non-executive Director. The purpose was for the new company to purchase the Mather and Platt Sprinkler business including it’s agency for the Grinnell sprinkler in exchange for 2500 Ordinary shares in Dowson, Taylor and Co. Limited plus £7,000 and to purchase the Dowson and Taylor business with it’s patents for 2,500 Ordinary shares plus stock equipment, tools and work in progress at a reasonable valuation.

The new company wasted no time and soon a London office was opened under John Wormald in Victoria Street with him having responsibility for all sales south of River Trent. North of this the sales were the responsibility of the Manchester office.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      


                                                                                                                                                 

                                                                Ralph DOWSON                                                         Dowson, Taylor & C° Limited                                                             John T. TAYLOR

 


                                                                                                       
                                                                                                            (click on)         

 

1888 - The Dowson-Taylor variable pressure ALARM valve

The variable Pressure Alarm Valve was invented by Ralph Dowson and  John T. Taylor. This valve is operated by the flow of the water, and is constructed so as to prevent false alarms being given by any variations of pressure in the main supply pipes : http://repository.iit.edu/bitstream/handle/10560/118/grinnellvariable00eyer.pdf?sequence=1


 
                               (click on these images)
                                                             
                                This Alarm valve Dowson & Taylor for automatic fire extinguishers
was patented under n° 384,514 June 12, 1888. 


                                                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                                                         Mather & Platt Ltd's Alarm valve 

                                                                                                             To see how a Sprinkler head works click here





                                               (click on)


1899 Mather & Platt Limited public company was registered on 21 January.

The company was registered to take over the business of mechanical, electrical and hydraulic engineers Mather and Platt, and of fire engineers Dowson, Taylor and Co.

With the setting up of the new Company referred the managing directors realised that the enterprise had outgrown the limits of the Salford Iron Works site. They saw clearly that the future of the business lay in its concentration and development on a scale beyond anything hitherto attempted.

1900 - Newton Heath the birthplace of Park Works Manchester.

Such concentration and development entailed changes in organisation as well as changes in location, but the two sets of considerations went together. The three reasons for the move from Salford Iron Works to Newton Heath were first, to acquire satisfactory railway siding facilities; second, to find open spaces in which to be able to expand; and third, to provide scope for centralised and efficient management, control and production. The first of these reasons could in itself be regarded as a self-sufficient cause for removing the works. There were no railway siding facilities at the Salford Iron Works and consequently everything had to be carted through the streets, a state of affairs that placed a limit on business expansion. John Taylor and John Wormald caught a glimpse of an attractive site at Newton Heath through a railway carriage window, and the vision was gradually turned into reality.

It was in 1900 that the fifty-acre plot of nearly level ground at Newton Heath was secured by the Company. It had direct access to the Lancashire and Yorkshire and The London and North-Western Railways, was on the bank of the Rochdale Canal, and was well served by main roads. Although the Boer War was in progress, building operations started at once. An administrative building two storeys in height was constructed, with the general office and drawing office open from end to end, the supervisory staff alone being provided with separate rooms. The building itself was of unusual construction being based on the design of an American firm which specialised in what they termed ‘slow burning’ buildings - solid wood built into an outer 'skin’ of brick. It is said that this remarkable structure is as good today as it was when first erected. At the same time the adjoining machine shop was erected.

John Taylor’s energy and imagination made it possible. The workshop, 380 feet long and 130 feet wide, was built to a great extent of material, which was originally erected to provide the machinery hall of the Paris Exhibition of 1900. The Hall was bought by the Company, dismantled in Paris by its own engineers, brought direct to Manchester along the Manchester Ship Canal, and re-erected together with a smaller amount of steelwork fabricated in Manchester, at Newton Heath, where, as Bays Number 1 to 4, it formed a nucleus around which the present works have been built. The first department to transfer to the new home Fire Equipment moved over a single weekend. Such was the driving power and organising genius of John Taylor that after the employees ceased productive work at Blackfriars at twelve o’clock on Saturday, the machinery was dismantled and, transported to Park Works; the millwrights worked through the weekend and production started at Newton Heath at the normal time on Monday morning. This would have been a feat of considerable magnitude in the second half of the twentieth century when powerful cranes, mobile handling and lifting tackle, supported by a fleet of mechanical transport vehicles would have been employed on the transfer but it was a triumph of organisation fifty years earlier when much of the plant would be moved twice by manual labour and horse drawn lorries were employed to provide all the necessary transport.

In accordance with an ordered scheme of development additions to the first building were made in 1903, 1905, 1909 and 1910. It was in 1909 that it was finally decided to make provision for the gradual removal of all remaining departments from the old works in Salford, and the construction of two new machine shops, each 379 feet long and 40 foot wide, enabled the Electrical Department to find a more congenial home. A year later, still following Taylor’s original plan, seven more shops, each 379 feet long, were constructed. In 1913 a building which later housed the Brass Foundry, the Forge and the Tank Shop was completed and the work of providing a new wing of four bays totalling 161 foot wide was put in hand and brought the number of bays to seventeen just prior to the 1914 War. There were further extensions in 1920, when fourteen of the bays were lengthened. In 1926 a building to accommodate the General Engineering Drawing Offices was erected and in 1939 and 1940 other shops were erected to provide new accommodation for the Tool Room and the Steel Rolling Shutter department.

Among special buildings added at Park Works were the Staff Canteen (1917), the Research Laboratory (1919), the Girls’ Canteen (1938) and the Iron Foundry (1938); while the Sports Ground at the front of the Works was not completed until 1950.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                        (click on these images)
  

To see major changes in to life of a firm in terms of such anecdotes is both to over-dramatise and to over-simplify the logic of cause and effect. In point of fact there was urgent need for expansion and for the re--siting of parts of the company’s enterprise, particularly the fire engineering business previously conducted by Dowson, Taylor & Co. Ltd. at Blackfriars: hence the merit of Newton Heath which was an undeveloped site, capable of gradual development. Before seeing the open space on which Park Works now stands Taylor inspected and half approved a site in Great Clowes Street, Broughton, but he felt that "the policy of the firm should be one of greater vision than this”. By contrast the scheme to acquire the extensive site at Newton Heath seemed too ambitious to some critics but they were proved wrong almost from the start.
The third reason for a change the quest for a home offering scope for more efficient control of production - also made imperative the search for premises, where materials could be more easily handled and where workers could be effectively supervised. The growing use of jigs and automatic tools demanded systematic arrangement of machines to produce large quantities at low cost. Salford Iron Works with its buildings at varying angles to one another, differences in floor levels, rough floors and heavy galleries was an unsuitable place for development in production technique or departmental sub-division. Newton Heath was a big enough site to allow for the arrangement of workshops in such a way that unnecessary waste of time and effort could be eliminated.

It was in 1900 that the fifty-acre plot of nearly level ground at Newton Heath was secured by the Company. It had direct access to the Lancashire and Yorkshire and The London and North-Western Railways, was on the bank of the Rochdale Canal, and was well served by main roads. Although the Boer War was in progress, building operations started at once. An administrative building two storeys in height was constructed, with the general office and drawing office open from end to end, the supervisory staff alone being provided with separate rooms. The building itself was of unusual construction being based on the design of an American firm which specialised in what they termed ‘slow burning’ buildings - solid wood built into an outer 'skin’ of brick. It is said that this remarkable structure is as good today as it was when first erected. At the same time the adjoining machine shop was erected.


John Taylor’s energy and imagination made it all possible. Whilst visiting the Paris Exhibition of 1900, he negotiated and bought for the company the workshop, 380 feet long and 130 feet wide, and was the machinery hall for the exhibition. It incorporated all the latest ideas of a modern engineering factory building. He arranged for the building to be dismantled under the supervision of Edwin Buckley, using their own Dowson and Taylor engineers, and brought direct to Manchester along the Manchester Ship Canal. It was re-erected together with a smaller amount of steelwork fabricated in Manchester, at Newton Heath, where, as Bays Number 1 to 4, it formed a nucleus around which the present works have been built. The first department to transfer to the new home Fire Equipment moved over a single weekend. Such was the driving power and organising genius of John Taylor that after the employees ceased productive work at Blackfriars at twelve o’clock on Saturday, the machinery was dismantled and, transported to Park Works; the millwrights worked through the weekend and production started at Newton Heath at the normal time on Monday morning. 


 - Mather & Platt Engineering Collection 

The men and women - the machines - the work of about one hundred and fifty years, from the early days at Salford Iron Works to the Platts and the entrepreneurial Mathers, the Dowson-Taylor story and the successes of Newton Heath thence to the final chapter of take-over, demise and demolition ... it is a Manchester story that needs to be there. The Mather & Platt story, however, is far more than just a tale of technical progress or the acquisition of new markets - for in the course of its long history, the company acquired a tradition and an international reputation which could be counted amongst the biggest of its assets. As Professor Richard Pares once wrote, “Until we can quote histories of representative banks, steamship companies, jerry-builders, tea planters, wine merchants, servants, registries, coal miners and the like, we shall still be talking about the history of economic policy, not about economic history - a particularly bad mistake to make about a country like Great Britain, where the efforts of society have usually counted for so much and those of the rulers of society comparatively speaking, for so little.”  Richard ParesA West Indian Fortune (1950),p. VII.



Double Cylinder Diagonal Steam Engine M+P

Engineering Hub - links to other divisions  (click on)  Engineering Hub 

Mather & Platt Steam Engine


A note about Steam Engine-Trials

In a paper read to the Institution of Civil Engineers in December 1889, Professor Osborne Reynolds (qv Pumps Department) described with some pride a large triple-expansion steam engine which had been installed under his close supervision in the Whitworth Engineering Laboratory at Owens College.

Characteristically, Reynolds ensured that this new test facility was extremely flexible. The engine could be operated as a triple-expansion condensing engine or run in a variety of other ways. In his address he defined the purpose of the engines as two-fold; (i) to afford students practice in making the many measurements involved in steam engine-trials, to give them an insight into the action of the steam and the mechanical components and to familiarize them with good design; (ii) to supply a means of research by which the knowledge of the steam- engine could be extended.

The detailed design and the construction of the engines and the boiler were undertaken by Messrs. Mather and Platt, whose `zeal and liberality' Reynolds gratefully acknowledged.

It was decided to have the three engines on separate brakes and that these should be hydraulic devices rather than ones dependent on mechanical friction. William Froude had earlier developed a radically new design for a compact hydraulic brake for determining the power of large engines. Accordingly, Reynolds tested a 4-inch diameter model of the new design. He found that when the speed exceeded a certain limit, the brake partially emptied itself of water and the resistance correspondingly decreased. To overcome this defect, Reynolds had radial holes drilled through the metal of the fixed vanes in such a way as to maintain the water in the brake at atmospheric pressure or above it under all conditions of operation. Having tested this idea out using his model, Reynolds adopted it successfully on the 18-inch wheels which became the hydraulic brakes for his three-cylinder steam engine.

Click here to view a fine example of a renovated Mather & Platt steam pump which can be found at the Cambridge Museum of Technology, in England.


 

                                                                                                                                              (click on these images)

Calender Ten Cylinders Textile Printing





Pair of Generators
(Each 120HP)


Textile Printing Machine
(14 colours)

Gas Motor 1000





                           Gas Motor 1500

  Reynolds-Mather
High-Lift Turbine Pump


Driven by a special M+P
direct-acting steam engine.



Zoelly Turbine 1800


M&P Dynamo
It generated light for the PARIS EXHIBITION of 1900


          
Electro-pump
(2.708 M3/H. 13 bars)


Electrical Department
Machine Edison-Hopkinson
           
 Mather's Patent High-Speed Spring Beetling Machine   c.1878 


  

Drilling & Boring Equipment

A steam driven boring machine which used a flat hemp rope in place of 'boring rods'. The cutters of the 'boring head' and the rope were lifted by a vertical steam cylinder and allowed to fall freely. The fall varied from 2ft 6ins upwards. The weight of the cutting tools, guide bar, and rotating mechanism weigh upwards of a ton, depending on the size of the hole being bored. Holes up to 3ft in diameter could be bored down to a great depth and a solid core retrieved. Mather & Platt also manufactured Coal Cutting Machines.

Raising Machine


Early Light Three-Bowl Friction Calender

1910 -  The Steam fire sprinkler pump Mather & Platt limited of Ellenroad spinning mill.-

This pump was designed in 1857 by Mather & Platt, and  was installed in 1910. 

Visit Ellenroad Engine House Steam Museum - http://www.ellenroad.org.uk/On-Site/the-pump-room

The Pump Room contains the largest working Mather and Platt sprinkler Grinnell pump in preservation. This pump provided the water for the fire-fighting sprinklers in the mill. It is classed as an Underwriters Steam Pump, this relates to the firms of insurance underwriters who provided fire insurance cover for the whole mill. With a capacity of approx. 600 gallons a minute, it is thought to have been built and installed circa 1910 and today is still worked by steam from our lancashire boiler.

To start the steam pump, click on the link with full screen :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mdo2WvgZH8


  1930 - Food Machinery -

  Radcliffe Factory, Lancashire

             United Kingdom           

             ________________

In 1930, the world wide trade depression had seriously affected British Industry and M & P had suffered with the rest. The Directors were, therefore, on the lookout for new lines to manufacture, which would help to keep the works, occupied, and bring more business to the Company.

At that time the Canning Industry in Great Britain was comparatively small and most of the equipment was being imported, largely from America. The Board of Trade were anxious to find British sources of manufacture for imported machinery, including Canning Machinery, and the few British Canners also wished to become less dependent upon imported Plant.

M & P Ltd. were approached by the Board of Trade, with the support of British Canners and, eventually, decided to go into this entirely new line of business, despite the fact that they would have to meet competition from established manufacturers from overseas. It seemed to be a sound long-term policy as the need to produce more food at home was generally recognised, and there appeared to be the beginnings of an agricultural revival. Furthermore, practically no other British firms were, at that time, making Canning Machinery and it was considered that a good start could be made with the Home Market.

The Canning Industry itself was not new. The earliest commercial experiments had taken place during the French Revolutionary Wars, about the time that the first Mather of this History settled in Salford. In 1804, Nicholas Appert invented a method of preserving food by sealing it hermetically in containers in a sterile condition and thereby won a prize of 12,000 Francs offered by Napoleon for improved methods of preserving food for the Army and Navy. However, it was an Englishman, Peter Durand, who first used tinplate steel containers for preserving food, obtaining a Patent in 1810 for a process of “preserving animal vegetable and other perishable foods by heat followed by hermetically sealing in vessels made of glass, pottery, tin or any metal or fit materials”. Some of the first metal vessels developed were known as tin cases, or canisters, and from this name the Americans have adopted the word. “Can”, and the British the word “Tin”. Tins of Australian mutton were on show at the Great Exhibition of 1851, and canned meat was used successfully for the first time by British troops in The Crimean War. The expression "Iron Rations” resulted.

However, the early development of the Canning Industry met continual checks due to an incomplete understanding of the scientific problems involved, and the lack of hygienic methods and equipment. Canned food was often regarded as being dangerous or unpleasant and the growth of the Industry was largely fostered by the demands made upon it in time of War.

Despite its early start in Europe the centre of the Canning Industry quickly moved to America, where the great variety of Fruits and Vegetables which were available, and the varied climate, lent themselves to an all-year round canning cycle.

The First World War did much to stimulate the growing Canning Industry and in the inter-war years, the civilian demand increased sharply. The wide variety and improved quality of Canned Food making it an accepted part of everyday diet, on both sides of the Atlantic, so that the worker of the 1920’s was able to have a much greater choice of food than the cotton operative of mid-Victorian Manchester. In 1924, a Special Commissioner who was sent to Canada and the United States, reported that the development of a large British industry was feasible, providing that modern machinery and methods were used.

Mather & Platt’s entry into the Food Machinery Industry, in 1930, was followed by a Canners Convention a year later, in Manchester, when the Firm was able to entertain delegates to Park Works to study the latest machines they had to offer.

The new Food Machinery Department was started first as a branch of the General Machinery or Textile Department, though it drew its small staff from both it and from the Pump Department. The start was only a small one; the new line of production was difficult to develop, particularly during those depression years, the Americans had had much experience of designing Food Machinery, particularly automatic machinery, and it was felt that if further progress was to be made, that the Company would have to work closely with an American firm of experience.

In 1932, an Agreement was made with the Food Machinery Corporation of the United States, for the manufacture of some of their standard Canning Equipment. A general Selling Company was set up outside the United States and Canada, called “Food Machinery (M & P) Ltd”, to sell both American and British made machines, as was convenient.

The new Company faced a difficult period. The expansion of the Canning Industry during the First World War had been considerable and Canners’ investments in plant had often outstripped the growth of the markets for their products. Even by 1926, when the General Trade Depression had receded, the new Company did not come up to expectations, although it had served a useful purpose in opening up fresh markets in Britain and also overseas. However, it was mutually decided to close down the sales Company, Food Machinery (M & P) Ltd although the friendly relationship between the Food Machinery Corporation and. Mather & Platt Ltd continued. Visits and ideas were exchanged and certain American Patents were retained. Nevertheless, the business continued, to expand slowly and the Department was able to justify its existence.

When the Second World War broke out, the small Food Machinery Department turned to Government Contracts, and while making a certain amount of Dehydration Plant for the Ministry of Agriculture, its productive capacity was largely devoted to War Contracts, which had no relationship to Food Machinery.

It was not until the end of the War that the demand for British Made Food Machinery really increased. The great use which was made of Canned Food by all of the conflicting Nations, stimulated the civilian demand and made the general public expect to have Canned Food as part of their daily ration. At the same time, the demand for all other products of the Firm had correspondingly increased and to relieve the congestion at Park Works, a lease was taken of the Royal Ordnance Factory at Radcliffe. The whole of the Food Machinery Department, being the smallest and most compact Department in the Firm, was moved there. This Works was suitable for light engineering, and that part of the Factory which was not required for Food Machinery became an overflow for the other departments at Park Works.

The inevitable teething troubles which followed on from a move of this sort were made worse, by the general post war conditions. Irregular, or short, deliveries of raw materials and bought out parts, wide varieties in quality, and unexpected delays or shortages, created many new problems which had to be tackled, by comparatively inexperienced workpeople and staff, many of whom had but recently returned from the War. Nevertheless, the Department set about putting its house in order with enthusiasm and in its new home, expanded rapidly. Meanwhile, by the end of the War, the various patents and manufacturing agreements with the Food Machinery Corporation and its subsidiaries had run out and consideration had to be given to future policy.

Before the War, a useful trade had been carried on in Europe. This was done partially by export, and partially by local manufacture. In France, Brittany was the main centre of vegetable and fish canning and in this area S.A. Mather & Platt had made arrangements with a local firm at Quimper, Establissements Jean Louarn, to manufacture any Food Machinery which, for various reasons could not be imported. Similarly, in Belgium, an arrangement was made with the firm of Edouard Lecluyse in Antwerp, and Food Machinery of Mather & Platt design was manufactured in both Factories for sale in Europe.

In Belgium, during the German Occupation, matters took a different turn. A German Firm of Food Machinery Manufacturers, Karges-Hammer A.G., came to an Agreement with Edouard Lecluyse whereby they took over and expanded his business, building a new Factory which provided machinery to can German Army Rations. They acquired technical information and drawings, which had been the property of Mather & Platt Ltd and were also able to continue certain development work which was being undertaken in the Belgian Factory.

At the end of the War, this Factory was sequestrated by the Belgian Custodian of Enemy Property, and offered for sale. A series of negotiations then took place amongst interested parties, principally the Food Machinery Corporation of America, the Sobemi Company (Can Manufacturing Concern) of Belgium, and Mather & Platt Ltd. These negotiations naturally linked up with future manufacturing policy between the Food Machinery Corporation and Mather & Platt Ltd., and the renewal, or otherwise, of their association. Final proposals were that a new International Company should be formed called the “International Machinery Corporation” operating from the Lecluyse/Karges-Hammer Factory at Antwerp, and jointly owned by the interested parties. In addition, it was suggested that Mather & Platt’s Canning Department should be incorporated in the new Company and some form of rationalised production arranged between the new Antwerp Factory and the new Factory at Radcliffe.

These proposals were not acceptable to Mather & Platt Ltd, since it was felt that complete control of the Radcliffe Factory should be retained within the general framework of the Company. Accordingly, no new arrangements were made with the Food Machinery Corporation and the I.M.C. was formed, in conjunction with the Sobemi Co., and a number of leading can making companies but without Mather & Platt Ltd. This new Company, and also the Food Machinery Corporation, thus came into direct competition with the British firm.

Most of the Food Machinery Department’s early machines were of American design or based upon American designs and during the War, the Americans had done much research and development work which resulted in new and up to date models. In Great Britain, all efforts had had to be concentrated on the War, and development work on Food Machinery had not been permitted.

Research and development work was intensified, in close co-operation, as previously, with the University of Bristol Fruit and Vegetable Preservation Research Station at Campden. One machine evolved as a direct result of this co-operation was the Stero-Washer which, working on the contraflow principle, was able to reduce the bacteriological infection of peas about eightfold.

Perhaps the most interesting and. revolutionary machine developed by the Department was the Non-Agitating Automatic Continuous Pressure Cooker. This machine was originally developed and patented in 1933, in conjunction with Campden and was designed to take advantage of the short time, high temperature cooking theory, which the Research Station had advanced. All vegetable packs are sterilised by being held at a high temperature for a given time - the higher the temperature, the shorter the time. It was found that peas which required sterilising in the ordinary retorts for 30 minutes at 2400F in the new Cooker only required 11 minutes at 260 0F. This shorter time not only produced a better looking and more economical pack, but also resulted in a higher nutritive value. Continual advances were made in the design of these Cookers and by 1951 they were capable of running continuously at speeds of 200 cans per minute and more, and even handling aluminium cans. These machines being about the only satisfactory non-agitating automatic Pressure Cookers found a wide market both at home and overseas.

The range of Food Machinery manufactured by Mather & Platt Ltd, included not only machines for Canning, but also machines for general food purposes such as Root Vegetable and other Washers, Food Pumps, Grain Dryers and Glass Jar Dryers, Peelers for all types of fruit and vegetables, Graders by size, weight or specific gravity, many forms of Cutters, Choppers, Dicers and Slicers, Filling and Inspection Tables and Conveyers which handle a great variety of items.

The M & P designed Pea Viner, embodying several new features, and having a higher throughput than competitive models, found ready markets, several hundreds being sold at home and overseas.

A Mather & Platt Canning Line is fully automatic, and processing times and temperatures can be controlled by the operation of instruments alone. A good example is the Pea Line. The Pea Vine is reaped in the field and loaded automatically onto a Trailer. It is then tipped alongside the Viner into which it is fed. with pitch forks. The shelled peas are delivered from one side of the Viner at the rate of about 30 cwts per hour and the waste vine is carried away on a Conveyor to be made into silage. The peas are then elevated into the Winnower, which cleans them, gravitate through a Washer and are pumped to the Grader and again to the next process of Blanching. Here the intercellular gases are driven out, surface infections are removed and the peas are thoroughly cleaned. They are then cooled and washed again, passing over a Picking Table where they are visually inspected for the removal of sub-standard peas. They are then washed again, pass through a machine to remove splits and skins, elevated to a Hopper, from which they gravitate to the Filler and then into the can together with a measured quantity of brine. The filled cans then pass through an Exhauster system which, by heating the can and its contents, drives off the air and ensures a good vacuum in the can after the next process of seaming on the lids. The closed cans then travel through an automatic Pressure Cooker and Cooler from where they roll away to be labelled and cased, or stored. Similar lines are made for handling other Vegetables, Fruits and Fish while specialised machines can be incorporated in the Lines to adapt them for Soup, Milk or Meat.

Throughout the whole of this process, no part of the pea or pea vine need be touched by hand, and the peas are usually in labelled cans, graded according to size, and cooked within four hours of the pea vine being reaped. An automatic line of this description can handle two hundred cans a minute with very little labour, and under complete and automatic process control. This chain of processes would amaze a housewife, and surprise an early pioneer like Appert. It is an excellent example of a revolution in the consumer industry, which has revealed yet again the close connection between technical invention and business enterprise.

The Proposed Mather & Platt Museum
                                                                                                                                                (click on this image)

1926 -  The M&P Long Service Association 

Forerunner of the M&P L.S.A. annual celebration ... This particular dinner was held at the Victoria Hotel on December 3rd, 1926 with over eighty Foremen and guests attending.

"The function was introduced by an attempt - arranged by the Publicity Department - to take a flashlight photograph of the company present ... it was noticed that the photographer made a hasty exit by an inconspicuous doorway, and in view of the dense smoke which for a time befogged the room, it was, perhaps, as well! However, as soon as the excellent dinner itself was served, this minor affair was speedily forgotten and everyone proceeded to do justice to the excellent fare provided. Towards the close of the repast, Mr. Flockton made a short and witty speech of welcome to the guests of the Foremen and took the opportunity of thanking the Directors of the Company ..."
 
 
2002 - 50th Anniversary Annual Dinner & Reunion of Mather & Platt Long Service Association, Friday 19th April 2002 at the Ballroom Pennine Way Hotel Oldham    

     ... the spirit of good fellowship.

    ENTER HERE
Mr. Albert E. LambertAddress and Toast by Mr. Albert E. Lambert
President and Chairman of the Association

"It is a great pleasure to me to propose the toast to the L.S.A. in the Golden Jubilee Year of the Association, particularly as we are honoured and delighted to welcome Lady Eleanor Mather and Peter as our principal Guests of Honour. This gives us all a timely reminder of the memory of Sir William, our late President, who supported the Association so loyally and enthusiastically - from when he succeeded his father, Mr. Loris Emerson Mather in 1960, to when he was Chairman of M+P and later also, after he retired. We remember “Bill” with great affection and respect. It is also particularly interesting and gratifying the we are sharing this Golden Jubilee with Her Majesty the Queen who came to the throne in such sad circumstance at about the same time that the Mather & Platt Long Service Association was inaugurated. 1952 was quite a momentous year!"

Reported in “OUR JOURNAL” Spring 1953

2012 - 60th Anniversary Annual Dinner & Reunion of Mather & Platt Long Service Association-  *

 


The History of Mather & Platt Ltd book
was commissioned to celebrate the 60th Anniversary
of the Mather & Platt Long Service Association.

"Fascinating... a fabulous insight into how Mather & Platt helped to
create social welfare reforms for the impoverished Salford
community during the early 19th Century.

Salford Museum of Social History and Art Gallery 
Required reading for those who want to learn more about the
Manchester and Salford engineering pioneers and innovators that
helped to make Britain great.

Manchester Museum of Science & Industry
The employees of this local Manchester and Salford Company
excelled themselves both on and off the Battlefield. No other
company made such a diverse and valuable contribution to the war
effort during World War Two."
Imperial War Museum
 
 
*  Long Service Association   *   (click on)
 


2014 - 62nd Annual Dinner & Reunion of the Mather & Platt Long Service Association, Friday 4th April 2014  at the Smokies Best Western Hotel Oldham                                               

     ... the spirit of good fellowship.         Oldham is a large town in Greater Manchester, England. It lies amid the Pennines on elevated ground between the rivers Irkand Medlock, 5.3 miles (8.5 km) south-southeast of Rochdale, and 6.9 miles (11.1 km) northeast of the city of Manchester. Oldham is surrounded by several smaller towns that together form the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, of which Oldham is the administrative centre.

Historically in Lancashire, and with little early history to speak of, Oldham rose to prominence during the 19th century as an international centre of textile manufacture. It was a boomtown of the Industrial Revolution, and among the first ever industrialised towns, rapidly becoming "one of the most important centres of cotton and textile industries in England". At its zenith, it was the most productive cotton spinning mill town in the world, producing more cotton than France and Germany combined.[5] Oldham's textile industry began to fall into decline during the mid-20th century, and its last mill closed in 1998.                                    


                                       

                                         (click on this image)

2015 - 63rd Annual Dinner & Reunion of the Mather & Platt Long Service Association, Friday 24th April 2015 at the Smokies Best Western Hotel Oldham   

    ... the spirit of good fellowship. 


Norman Ellison - Secretary M&P L.S.A.

Mr. Norman Ellison
 Secretary 
Toastmaster
                                               Service Division


Peter Jones - Vice President M&P L.S.A.

Mr. Peter JONES
President
Power Division

December 2003: Norman writes (see Guest Book) "My father, Arthur Ellison, worked at M&P Park Works from the 1920s to 1962 when he retired as the foreman of the Machine Tool Maintenance Dept. He was born in Lower Broughton, Salford and lived in Camp St. His father (my grandfather) W.T.Ellison, designed the early "Non-Rush" Turnstiles which are still at many stadiums throughout the world - including Old Trafford cricket ground and, until recently, at Maine Road football ground."

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Late twentieth century - 

                                                                                                  Click  here
                                                                                                 (click on)
                                                                                                                           The Last days of Newton Heath 



                                                                               - UNITED  STATES OF AMERICA -   

                                                                                                               Résultat de recherche d'images pour "états unis d'amérique"

                   United States

                Tyco Simplex-Grinnell

  Westminster, Massachusetts, USA                 

                                                                                            "The Grinnell Corporation History"

                                                                                               Founded: 1850 as Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company 




                                                                                                                      

                                              
                                                                 Frederick Grinnell - Sprinklers Fire systems -  http://www.zipworld.com.au/~lnbdds/Boschi/grinnellco.htm 

                      

                                                                                                                                                         

                                                                                        Frederick Grinnell (1836-1905)                             First Head of Sprinkler designed by Frederick Grinnell  (1881)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                                         

                                                                                                   The Descendants of Matthews and Rose (French) Grenell

 -  Frederick Grinnell - Pioneer in fire  safety 

Inventor, engineer, and industrialist, Frederick Grinnell was the creator of the first practical automatic fire sprinkler, which has made an enormous contribution to fire safety.

Earlier in his career, he was draftsman, construction engineer, and manager for various railroad manufacturers. He designed and built more than 100 locomotives.

In 1869 he purchased a controlling interest in a company that manufactured fire-extinguishing apparatus. Grinnell licensed a sprinkler device patented by Henry S. Parmelee, then worked to improve the invention, and in 1881 patented the automatic sprinkler that bears his name. He continued to improve the device and in 1890 invented the glass disc sprinkler, essentially the same as that in use today.

He secured some 40 distinct patents for improvements on his sprinklers and he adopted a dry pipe valve and automatic fire-alarm system, invented by John T. Taylor.

The year 1883 was the key in the history of the Fire Engineering Department of Mather & Platt Limited. Two important events took place. William Mather visited the United States of America to investigate American methods of technical education and in the course of his travels met Frederick Grinnell, who had just patented his new "Grinnell" automatic sprinkler head. Grinnell was so amazed and delighted that an Englishman should give his time and pay his own expenses to travel in search of knowledge for the benefit of his country, without a hope of personal reward, that he offered William Mather the sole selling rights for the “Grinnell” sprinkler for the whole of the world excepting the territories of the United States of America and Canada. The offer was accepted and Mather & Platt thus had their first ‘baptism’ in the business of fire engineering.

The ingenious Alarm Valve invented by Mr. John Taylor, Next to Mr. Frederick Grinnell‘s invention remains the most important advance in the development and practice of Automatic Fire Extinction. The new valve of Mr John T. Taylor was speedily adopted by Mr Frederick Grinnell himself and applied all over America. It is still an integral part of every Sprinkler Installation.

The patent rights covering John Taylor’s Alarm Valve were later granted to the ‘Grinnell’ Corporation in America, and his alarm valve continues in use to this day.

In 1892, Grinnell organized the General Fire Extinguisher Co., an amalgamation of several smaller companies, which became the foremost organization in its field of manufacture. Today the Grinnell Fire Protection Co. is a part of Tyco International Ltd.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Grinnell's sprinkler head 1890            How Sprinkler Systems Work see  Video vimeo.com/71783310                       Grinnell's Sprinkler 2000

                                                                                                                                                                 

 - REFERENCES :  University and College Fire protection see video 

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaT8oKsMnKc

 (by courtisy of BASF, Morgan State Universiy and Loyala  College)   


    ... the spirit of good fellowship. 

2017 - Bibliography -

     Salford Iron Works

  Hardman Street, Salford

  Contents

 [hide

   The History of Mather and Platt Book    


   Mather & Platt - Wikipedia 

    Industries textiles protégées par sprinklers :

    Histoire de Fraize - La Costelle - L'industrie Cotonnière (pages 258 à 268) 

 Archives départementales des Vosges  

  1. Fonds de la filature Géliot

  2 - Fonds de la filature de Vincey