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HMS at Rudyard Lake, N. Staffordshire.

posted 9 Jul 2017, 08:22 by Neil Stott   [ updated 9 Jul 2017, 15:15 ]

HMS Rudyard Lake

As guests of the Rudyard Lake Trust, and more particularly Ray Perry, the human dynamo who runs the show, we had the chance to try out The Blue Launch away from the pressures of timetables and agendas that re-enactment events inevitably entail.




I felt that the progress we made, however stately, was pretty good considering the weight of the vessel and she certainly looked the part from afar.


The gaff-rig of our launch looks well enough, we feel – it not been used very often -  so this was a golden opportunity for us to get to grips with its idiosyncrasies , mainly when tacking. We find that, certainly in the light breeze available over the weekend, we have to wait a good while for the main to start to fill before sheeting-in the fore and jib sails in order to bring her head around.  A dinghy she ain’t!






One of the main issues for us is the weight and the set of the launch, it being a replica RN frigate launch from c.1795 that was designed for general purpose tendering, servicing and transporting duties of men and materiel. With having a small keel, the launch has a definite  tendency to make considerable leeway - the sideways drift, to leeward, caused by the wind; with the inevitable impact on the distance between the course we steer and the course that we actually run.






Not all in HMS, it has to be said,  are regular yachtsmen and women so it was an instructive weekend if nothing else – all in a beautiful setting on Rudyard Lake.

We have decided to make several adjustments; to increase the keel depth by at least 150 mm (6”) to mitigate at least some of the issues with leeway, to consider deploying a lee-board when not using the launch for authentic purposes at events and to redesign the ballast arrangements for ease of transport. Currently we use small concrete blocks which are laid in once on the water but we are minded to use water ballast instead.


















We were treated to such wonderful hospitality that I feel that we ought to feature Rudyard Lake here and reproduce some of the web content from their website. Ray Perry was such a magnificent host and he made our stay at the lake a memorable one.

http://www.rudyardlake.com/

"A BRIEF HISTORY
The Lake was built as a reservoir in 1797; even to this day the Lake still supplies the canal system for which it was designed and remains an active working reservoir. Today, of course, it plays a major role in the provision of leisure pursuits as opposed to its industrial origins.
 
 The Lake is the place where Rudyard Kipling’s parents first met, where Captain Webb, the first channel swimmer, came to demonstrate his skills and where The African Blondin (Carlos Trower) appeared several times amazing the crowds 30m above the Lake on a tightrope. Little wonder it became  known as the ‘Blackpool of the Potteries’ in its heyday.
 
The North Staffs Railway used to run along the eastern shores of the Lake and a narrow gauge railway now runs along this track to approximately its halfway point. The steam trains would bring golfers, stopping at a small halt at the northern end of the Lake. The golfers would be met by their caddies, and escorted around the northern perimeter to the western shore, where the golf course was located. The golf course closed in 1926 owing to the competition from other golf courses, which had become established closer to the city."



YouTube Video

YouTube Video



HMS Tanfield

posted 28 Mar 2017, 05:00 by Neil Stott   [ updated 28 Mar 2017, 05:02 ]

HMS was pleased to attend an event with member Rob Langham’s colleagues at the Tanfield Railway.  A bracing weekend, it’s safe to say – just the weather for Khaki Drill and shorts!
We took our new vessel as part of a Great War event and the boat - and the Field Medical Station display -  certainly stimulated a lot of interest.

Chris, Ron, Jen, Bevan and Neil attended – and HMS' David Little too, along with his 'Durham Pals' unit.
 

HMS at Tanfield Railway Great War Weekend event 18th - 19th March

posted 3 Mar 2017, 03:58 by Neil Stott   [ updated 3 Mar 2017, 04:10 ]

http://www.tanfield-railway.co.uk/index.php?page=great-war-weekend

We will be taking our 'Great War British Red Cross Society and Order of St John of Jerusalem evacuation boat' , recreating the service in Mesopotamia circa 1917, an often overlooked theatre of the First World War. Often called Silver Thimble, after the charity that bought them, these boats were bought in the UK and shipped to Mesopotamia for local use.  Operations there reflect our interest in lesser known exploits that are largely forgotten today. We believe that this powered craft is  a fine addition to our Georgian and Second World War Naval Craft collection.

Our boat will be next to a small reenactment  display portraying a  Field Hospital in Mesopotamia (now modern day Iraq), the motor launch being used to recover wounded men along the River Tigris. Although the weather and location is unlikely to match Mesopotamia, this display is an important reminder of a forgotten part of the First World War

You can also discover the important role that the railways played during World War 1 in this talk by HMS member, Rob Langham, author of the North Eastern Railway in the First World War on Saturday 18th March, 7pm (doors open 6.30pm), Andrews House 

Tickets cost £5 per person on the day or £3 per person online, when purchased with a day rover ticket.  Tickets can be purchased online - here





British Ship Building - Wooden Boat Building 1943 - After Dunkirk

posted 29 Jan 2017, 05:29 by Neil Stott   [ updated 29 Jan 2017, 05:31 ]

Great War Project - Medical Evacuation Launch

posted 27 Jan 2017, 10:29 by Neil Stott   [ updated 29 Jan 2017, 05:39 ]

https://sites.google.com/site/historicalmaritimesociety/news/_draft_post-14/rogers.png

The next vessel to join the Historical Maritime Society's fleet will be a Great War British Red Cross Society and Order of St John of Jerusalem evacuation boat, serving in Mesopotamia circa 1917, an often overlooked theatre of the First World War. Often called Silver Thimble, after the charity that bought them, these boats were bought in the UK and shipped to Mesopotamia for local use.  Operations there reflect our interest in lesser known exploits that are largely forgotten today. We believe that this powered craft will be a fine addition to our Georgian and Second World War Naval Craft collection.

Click on the image to go straight to the WW1 page.

Great War Launch latest - paint

posted 18 Nov 2016, 12:53 by Neil Stott


Today is Trafalgar Day

posted 20 Oct 2016, 23:29 by Neil Stott

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/features/trafalgar-day

'Little Tich' - Engine working at last!

posted 16 Oct 2016, 11:23 by Neil Stott   [ updated 16 Oct 2016, 12:46 ]

YouTube Video

YouTube Video

YouTube Video


We finally got the engine running today - top work by Bev. It was really gratifying to get to this stage after such a lot of work, by many, over an extended period.


























HMS Terror found...

posted 13 Sep 2016, 11:26 by Neil Stott

YouTube Video


The Guardian  reports

"The long-lost ship of British polar explorer Sir John Franklin, HMS Terror, has been found in pristine condition at the bottom of an Arctic bay, researchers have said, in a discovery that challenges the accepted history behind one of polar exploration’s deepest mysteries.

HMS Terror and Franklin’s flagship, HMS Erebus, were abandoned in heavy sea ice far to the north of the eventual wreck site in 1848, during the Royal Navy explorer’s doomed attempt to complete the Northwest Passage."  continues....

Little Tich - and the paint goes on, and on...

posted 11 Sep 2016, 07:44 by Neil Stott

Bevan applies more (and more) paint on  'Little Tich'

2 Coats of marine undercoat applied to topsides. At least one more will be required.

Undercoat applied to benches, bulkheads,  bulwarks and part of hull interior.  More to do + second coat to wearing surfaces.

Engine ignition timing set-up but engine not yet started because we forgot the petrol !

Installation of Porthole underway.

Manual Bilge pump installation complete.

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