Model 1 Second Issue

Model Number 1 Second Issue--General information
This page reflects the information about the model 1 second issue revolver. This information applies to all model 1 second issues, and was useful in validating the model of the weapon in the special collections unit.

Manufacturing dates: 1860-1868
Ammunition: 22RF short
Serial numbers: 11,672-126,361
Barrel length: 3 3/16"
Finish: Silver frame, blue barrel and cylinder or full nickel/silver plate
Stocks: Smooth finish rosewood or ebony, square butt
Sights: "The front sight was a round blade and the rear was a notch cut in the rear of the cylinder stop"
General: "The frame of this model, like that of the First Issue, was made of brass. The sides of the frame were flat on this model, but the butt was shaped the same as the First issue. The steel barrel was octagonal in shape, and it was a single action gun with no half or safety cock provided.  The frame and barrel are hinged at the front of the top strap. Extraction of empty cartridge cases is accomplished by using the rammer pin located under the barrel to push them out after the cylinder is removed from the gun."[1]
Cost (at time): $10.50[2]
Total Production: 115,400+[3]
Alternate names: “Model No. 1 Second Model” “Second Model 22 Tip Up” and the “Second Model No 1.”[4]
Serial numbers 83,171-106,316 were produced in the year 1866[5]

This revolver, being a tip-up revolver, was loaded by lifting the barrel, which was hinged (visible in the image of the object, where the barrel meets the the brass). Seven rounds were placed in the removable cylinder. The protruding rod underneath the barrel was used as an ejecting device to remove the cartridges from the cylinder. The trigger is just visible in the image. The hammer is directly vertical of the trigger.





[1] Jinks, Roy G. and Neal, Robert J. Smith & Wesson: 1857-1945. New Jersey: A.S. Barnes and Co., 1966 pg 25-26 ISBN 0498013901
[2]
Jinks, Roy G. History of Smith & Wesson: No Thing of Importance Will Come Without Effort. California: Beinfeld Publishing Inc, 1977.
[3]
Ibid
[4]
Jinks, Roy G. and Neal, Robert J. Smith & Wesson: 1857-1945. New Jersey: A.S. Barnes and Co., 1966 pg 25-26 ISBN 0498013901
[5]
Ibid

Photo credit: Shideler, Dan. Gun Digest Book of Exploded Gun Drawings. Wisconsin: Gun Digest Books, 2011. Pg 335. http://books.google.com

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