sentence

10 Quick Ways to Use a Sentence


If you want to get some extra language practice out of just one sentence (taken from the coursebook, a handout, or even from the student's own work), try some of these short activities.

1. Write the sentence up on the board. Then call on students to come up and change 1, 2 or 3 words.

2. Write the sentence up on the board. Tell your class to choose three words out of the sentence, and make a new sentence with them, one that relates to them personally. Call on a few students to read out their sentences.

3. Dictate all the words in the sentence in scrambled order. Have students try to write the correct sentence. Get a volunteer to write the correct sentence on the board.

4. Write the sentence up on the board, then erase all but the first letters of each word. Then get students to write a new sentence in which the first letters of every word are the same as the original sentence.

5. Dictate a sentence to the class. Tell them to rewrite the sentence, changing as many words as possible, but keeping the meaning as close to the original as possible.

6. Write the sentence up on the board. Tell your students to make as many short sentences as they can using only the information in the original sentence.

7. Write the sentence up on the board. Tell your students to create as many questions as they can based on the sentence.

8. Write the sentence up on the board. Give students cards with words and phrases such as EVERY DAY, TOMORROW, and RIGHT NOW. Tell each student with a card to read the sentence again, and add the word/phrase on the card, changing verb tenses where appropriate.

9. Write the sentence up on the board in big letters with spaces between each word. Put an arrow in one of the spaces, and call on students to suggest words that could fit there. Do the same with the other spaces. Allow students to point out the spaces where NO words will fit.

10. Write the sentence up on the board. Have students create a sentence that could logically follow the one you wrote.


Originally posted on Dave's ESL Cafe Apr 2003
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