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New book chapters

posted Jul 2, 2018, 2:05 AM by Heejung Chung   [ updated Jul 2, 2018, 2:06 AM ]
Two book chapters based on the Welfare State Futures project have been published.

  • Heejung ChungEmail author
  • Maša Filipovič Hrast
  • Tatjana Rakar
  1. 1.
  2. 2.
Chapter
First Online: 28 June 2018

Abstract

Preferences for future care arrangements are rooted in current care provision as well as ongoing debates, but also indicate dissatisfaction with and limits to the existing care regimes. In Norway, childcare debates are about the equal division of parental leave, in Germany, about the recognition of women’s unpaid work, in the UK, about the importance of cutting costs and using childcare to encourage women into paid work, and in Slovenia about the need for affordable childcare to enable families to survive. Debates about eldercare focus more on the desirability of family care in richer countries and on excessive costs in poorer ones.

The balance between economic and social framings varies. In the UK and Slovenia the primary concerns are economic and to do with costs and parental opportunities in the labour market. In the other countries social arguments about gender equality, the recognition of women’s contribution and the quality of care also emerge.

Keywords

Work-life balance Care regime Childcare Gender Older care Social care Eldercare Work Emotional labour Care quality Cost 

  • Katharina ZimmermannEmail author
  • Heejung Chung
  • Jan-Ocko Heuer
  1. 1.
  2. 2.
Chapter
First Online: 28 June 2018

Abstract

Labour market issues were a major topic of discussion in all countries, but different aspects attracted attention: in Germany the key issues were precarious work, poor job conditions at the bottom end and the balance between work and family life; in the UK the strong work-first ethos dominated discussion; issues surrounding flexicurity (the cost of active labour market support and the extent of security) emerged in Denmark; and in Slovenia unemployment and living standards were the main focus. Immigrants were seen in different ways—as providing younger workers to balance ageing populations in Norway and Denmark, as requiring skill training and integration in Germany and as unwelcome competitors for jobs in the UK.

Social investment is valued everywhere for different reasons: for realigning the skills provided by education with those required by the market in Denmark; for producing more productive workers in the UK and Slovenia and enhancing opportunities so that individuals can take more responsibility for outcomes in the UK; and as compensating for inequalities in education and enhancing women’s opportunities in Germany.

Keywords

Labour market Inequality Work ethic Work first Responsibility Unemployment Skills Social investment Inequality Training Opportunity Precarity Gender 
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