Peer-Reviewed Articles


There are thousands of articles available on the subject of Health and Fitness. Researchers, students or anyone interested in the topic can find ample information using such databases as General Science Full Text, Business Full Text, Readers' Guide Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, Education Full Text, and Social Sciences Full Text. All articles are available as print and electronic sources.


Garcia, Kelli K. (2007). The Fat Fight: The Risks and Consequences of the Federal Government's Failing Public Health Campaign. Penn State Law Review 112 no2 529-86 Fall.

This article was written for the American public. The writing focuses on the efforts the government has made to address the issue of obesity.  While the government has provided advice on diet and health since 1862 (when the United States Department of Agriculture was created) the question remains whether the government should be involved in what is often seen as a private choice.  The author goes on to study how effective the information based interventions have been in dealing with obesity, the role of structural barriers in preventing healthy eating and exercise, understanding how and why food choices are made, and the problems inherent with dieting. Garcia also considers the moral issues of health and weight in our country and the stigmatism felt by those who are overweight. The writings conclude that the public health campaigns should focus on the public and work on programs that would not be achievable without the help of the government. I found this article in the OmniFile Full Text Mega database using the search term “Health and Fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.


Sloan, Richard P.;  Peter A. Shapiro; Ronald E. DeMeersman; Emilia Bagiella; Elizabeth N. Brondolo; Paula S. McKinley; lordan Slavov; Yixin Fang; Michael M. Myers. (2009) The Effect of Aerobic Training and Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Young Adults. American Journal of Public Health 99 no5 921-8 May.

This article covers the testing of healthy young adults and the effects of aerobic conditioning and strength training on cardiac autonomic modulation. The participants were randomly chosen from the campuses of Columbia and St. John’s Universities. The test groups consisted of young adults who did not exercise regularly and did not exceed the American Heart Association standards for average fitness. Certain groups were given aerobic conditioning programs and other groups were given strength- training programs.  The study concluded that aerobic conditioning (not strength training) led to cardio-protection but more analysis needed to be done to differentiate the effects on men vs. women. This discussion is analytical in nature and would benefit the researcher rather than the casual reader. I found this article in the Education Full Text database using the search term “Health and Fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.


Pettee, Kelley K.; Brach, Jennifer S.; Kriska, Andrea M. (2006). Influence of Marital Status on Physical Activity Levels among Older Adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise v. 38 no. 3 (March 2006) p. 541-6.

This article analyzes the level of physical activity in relationship to current marital status among older adults. The hypothesis was that marital status played an important role in participation in physical activities. The report also suggested that the activity level of one member of a married couple would be related to the activity level of the other.  The conclusion of these studies determined that active men were almost three times as likely to have a similarly active spouse. The study also suggested that spousal pair-based interventions could be a unique approach to improving the physical fitness of others. This article has many useful references and is easily understood.  I found the essay in the Education Full Text database using the search term “Health and Fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.


Robinette, Zoe. (2007) Training the Industrial Athlete: Fitness Training at UPS. Occupational Health & Safety v. 76 no. 4 (April 2007) p. 34, 36, 38.

This article talks about the training of “Industrial Athletes”, specifically for UPS in the NorCal district. These individuals are those whose jobs involve strength and stamina. Keeping their bodies in tune and at optimal operating performance means excellent performance and fewer work related injuries.  The article addresses the background of the program, how it got started, and how it is still progressing. The conclusions reached for the test group were impressive to say the least- where the NorCal district had been 48th; they now ranked first in a field of 50 for the number of associated worker's compensation injuries and costs.  This article is interesting for the general populace as well as anyone interested in the relationship between fitness and work. I found the abstract in the Business Full Text database using the search term “Health and Fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.  I found the full article on line at: http://ohsonline.com/Articles/2007/04/Training-the-Industrial-Athlete-Fitness-Training-at-UPS.aspx?Page=1.


Carey, Kathy. (2005) Changing Nutrition Standards: Eating in America. Montessori Life v. 17 no. 2 (Spring 2005) p. 36-9.

This article discusses issues related to nutrition as related to the dietary guidelines issued by the Department of Agriculture. The author also discusses the problem of obesity in children and adults in the United States.  The article itself is fairly short but discusses the “new food pyramid in depth, as well as proactive measures for keeping children on a healthy path in regards to food. The references and suggested readings are particularly helpful. I found the essay in the Education Full Text database using the search term “Nutrition in America” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.


“The Principles of Conservative Prescribing." Harvard Health Letter 34.8 (2009): 6-7. Health Source - Consumer Edition. EBSCO. Web. 26 July 2010.

This article reviews the importance of taking a conservative approach to medications.  The writing urges the patient to look at alternatives to medication, take a step-by-step approach to the use of medication, take note of side effects, understand that a new medication does not necessarily make it better, work with the doctor, and finally take responsibility for one’s health.  Written for the layperson or researcher, the letter points out the importance of both the doctor and patient taking responsibility for decisions made on the patient’s behalf.  I found the article in the Health Source-Consumer database using the search term “health and fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.   


Lifelong Exercise. (cover story)." Mayo Clinic Health Letter (2009): 1-8. Health Source - Consumer Edition. EBSCO. Web. 26 July 2010.

This article analyzes the development and implementation of a lifelong exercise plan.  The report recommends seeing a doctor before starting an exercise regimen. The study also stresses the importance of nutrition and diet with an exercise program, as well as understanding the different programs that exist. Aerobic exercise, strength training, core stability, flexibility and balance should all be part of an effective exercise program.  The report is well written and directed toward anyone interested in a healthier life style. I found the article in the Health Source-Consumer database using the search term “health and fitness” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.   


"Taking aim at belly fat." Harvard Women's Health Watch 17.12 (2010): 1-3. Health Source - Consumer Edition. EBSCO. Web. 27 July 2010.

This article focuses on visceral fats (belly fat) that may cause health risks. It suggests that visceral fat may be an indicator of several diseases including cardiovascular issues, asthma, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. The writing also states that where we tend to gain weight is dependent on our genes, hormones, age, birth weight and whether we have had children. The article stresses the importance of eating right, exercising, not smoking, getting enough sleep and being cognizant of mood shifts. I found the article in the Health Source-Consumer database using the search term “exercise” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.   


"Exercise as medicine." Harvard Women's Health Watch 16.5 (2009): 4-6. Health Source - Consumer Edition. EBSCO. Web. 29 July 2010.

This article discusses the importance of exercise to overall health. The essay points to the overall benefits of physical activity for any human being age 6 or older. There are also different websites that can help individuals get started with an exercise program and sustain fitness levels. Finally, there are also 2 sections on exercising with health conditions and exercising during pregnancy. Keeping it simple seems to be the key in maintaining a lifelong fitness program. I found the article in the Health Source-Consumer database using the search term “exercise” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.    


"Stay Stronger Longer with Weight Training. (Cover story)." Harvard Health Letter 23.12 (1998): 1. Health Source - Consumer Edition. EBSCO. Web. 29 July 2010.

This article stresses the health benefits of weight training for adults over the age of 50. Weight training (also known as resistance training) is known for significantly slowing the deterioration of muscle mass, bone density, and strength that so many feel is an inevitably with the aging process.  This commentary also points out that inactivity is the major reason for age-related muscle loss. Aerobic activity is important, but resistance training is imperative for stimulating the strength of bones, improving balance and helping older people live more independent lives. I found the article in the Health Source-Consumer database using the search term “exercise” and limiting to peer-reviewed articles.   


 

 

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