1.4 Harris of Cornworthy


CORNWORTHY, in the hundred of Coleridge and in the deanery of Totton, lies about four miles from Totnes, and six from Dartmouth, near the beautiful scenery of the Dart. East Cornworthy and Allats are villages in this parish. Cornworthy is spoken of as a borough in ancient records. (fn. 35)

At this place was a priory of nuns, of the order of St. Austin, founded, according to Risdon, by an ancestor of the Edgcumbes; according to Sir William Pole, (which is more probable,) by the lords of Totnes. (fn. 36) Its revenues were estimated at the time of the dissolution at 63l. The priory estate was granted, in 1560 or 1561, to Harris and Williams: it continued, for some generations, in the family of Harris. Of late years the priory estate, and the impropriate tithes, have been in the Basset family. It was sold by Lord de Dunstanville, about the year 1800, to Mr. John Holditch, the present proprietor, in whose family it is still vested.

A manor in Cornworthy (Corneorde) was held in demesne, at the taking of Domesday survey, by Joel de Totneis. The manor of Cornworthy, which belonged to the Boones, was sold, after the death of Thomas Boone, Esq., in 1679, by the Earl and Countess of Warrington, to John Harris, Esq., of whom it was not long after purchased by John Seale, Esq., of Mount Boone. This was sold some years ago to — Torring, in whose family it is still vested. The manor of East Cornworthy has long been in the family of Cholwich.

In the parish church is a monument in memory of Sir Thomas Harris, serjeant at law, and Dame Elizabeth his wife; the latter died in 1610. Dame Elizabeth Harris gave by will the sum of 100l. to this parish for charitable uses: it was laid out in land now producing about 20l. per annum, which is appropriated to a school.

(From: 'Parishes: Colyton - Culmstock', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), 

 


 



                                                             (Cornworthy Village)
      
 
 In the visitations of Devon the family is listed as being of Churston, a settlement near Torbay where the Torre Abbey.It is known that the family was at Cornworthy by 1535 when they bought a large part of the area, probably including the manor, following the dissolution of the monasteries in 1535-1539
 
The Harris family of Cornworthy has been traced back to Walter Harris shown in some publications as being of Wales. This is however not so as his son is recorded as being of Cornwall It is true that this family had land in Wales and spent some time there.
 
1580 Ricd. Hanbery v. John Lecke, Edwd. Harry, Walter Harry, Thos. Jerothe, and others.: Ironworks in Tynterne, and wood cut in Glascoyd for fuel for same, and works at Monkeswood, Treveythyn.: Monmouth 22 Eliz
 
COED-Y-MYNACH / MONKSWOOD (ex. par)[Description(s) from The National Gazetteer (1868)]"MONKSWOOD, an extra parochial liberty in the lower division of the hundred of Usk, county Monmouth, 3 miles W. by N. of Usk, its post town, and 4 N.E. of Pontypool. It is situated on the river Usk. The village is small, and wholly agricultural. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Llandaff, value £80. The Duke of Beaufort is impropriator." [Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
 
TREFDDYN / TREVETHIN"TREVETHAN, a parish in the upper division of Abergavenny hundred, county Monmouth, 7 miles from Usk, and 1 mile from Pontypool. It is situated near the Brecon and Monmouthshire canals and the river Afon Llwyd. The parish contains the townships of Aberyschan, Pontnewydd, and Pont-y-pool, the last being a polling place for the county and a petty sessions town. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the collieries, lime-pits, and extensive iron-works, chiefly at Pont-y-pool [which see]. The surface is hilly, the highest point being Mynydd-Maen, which has an elevation of 1,531 feet above sea-level."
 
It should also be noted that Prince in his Worthies of Devon of 1810 refers to Sir Thomas Harris being the son of William rather than Edward and there was a William Harry in Cornworthy in the late 1300s
 
1386 William Harry of Miston, and others including Kendale broke dykes and banks of Cornworthy property leading to a complaint by John Ellemede who was also assaulted. Patent rolls Richard 2
 
Descendants of Harris of Churston (At Cornworthy)
 
Walter HARRIS ( - ) & Chrystan ( - )
| Edward HARRIS Sir* (1547 - 8 Apr 1592) & Phillipa (or Elizabeth) VOWELL ( - )
| | Thomas HARRIS Sir (1547 - 17 May 1610) & Elizabeth POMEROY (About 1138/1159 - )
| | | Ann HARRIS* (1573 - 1636) & Thomas SOUTHWELL Sir (1575 - 12 Jun 1676)
| | | | Elizabeth SOUTHWELL ( - ) & John DOWDALL Sir ( - )
| | | | Frances SOUTHWELL ( - ) & William LENTHALL ( - )
| | | Ann HARRIS* (1573 - 1636) & Henry SIBTHORPE Captain ( - )
| | | Edward HARRIS Sir ( - 21 Aug 1638) & Elizabeth FOWELL ( - )
| | | | Mary HARRIS ( - ) & William GREATRAKES Esq (1573 - About 1632)
| | | | | Valentine GREATRAKES (14 Feb 1628 - 28 Nov 1682) & Ruth GODOLPHIN ( - 1675)
| | | | | | William GREATRAKES ( - 1686) & Mary WHEELER ( - )
| | | | | | | Son GREATRAKES ( - )
| | | | | | Edmund GREATRAKES ( - 1690) & Ann WILCOCKS ( - )
| | | | | | | Daughter GREATRAKES ( - )
| | | | | | Mary GREATRAKES ( - )
| | | | | William GREATRAKES ( - About 1699) & Jane TAYLOR ( - )
| | | | | John GREATRAKES ( - ) & Mary NELSON ( - )
| | | | | Edward GREATRAKES ( - )
| | | | | Mary GREATRAKES (1628 - 1684) & John NETTLES (Circa 1612 - 1680)
| | | | | | Penelope NETTLES (Before 1659 - ) & Henry WALLIS (After 1654 - 1739)
| | | | Elizabeth (Eliza) HARRIS ( - ) & John LANCASTER ( - )
| | | | Edmund HARRIS ( - After 1638)
| | | | Edward HARRIS ( - )
| | | | Arthur HARRIS ( - Before 1630)
| | | | Phillipa HARRIS ( - ) & Robert TYNTE ( - )
| | | | Thomas HARRIS Sir (1598 - Before 1665)
| | | Christopher HARRIS ( - )
| | | Honor HARRIS (Before 6 Oct 1578 - ) & Hugh HARRIS Sir ( - )
| Edward HARRIS Sir* (1547 - 8 Apr 1592) & Agnes HUCKMORE (Circa 1531 - 1 Dec 1601)
| | Arthur HARRIS* ( - 1640) & Honor WYKES ( - )
| | Arthur HARRIS* ( - 1640) & Phillipa DUKE (1572 - )
| | Susan HARRIS (Before 1566 - 1638) & Henry FORTESCUE ( - 1621)
| | | Arthur FORTESCUE ( - ) & Joan ( - )
| | | | Arthur FORTESCUE ( - )
| | | | | Bridget FORTESCUE ( - )
| | | | | Agnes FORTESCUE ( - )
| | | | Susan FORTESCUE ( - )
| | | | Edward FORTESCUE ( - )
| | | Edward FORTESCUE ( - )
| | John HARRIS ( - After 1638) & Mary ( - )
| | | Thomas HARRIS ( - )
| | | | Thomas HARRIS Sir ( - )
| | | | | Edward HARRIS ( - )
| | William HARRIS ( - 1594)
 
 
Walter Harris was at Tavistock with members of the Hayne, Radford and Lanrest branches in the early 1500s
 
1533 Reference: 482A/77-8 Leases Creation dates: 1533 Scope and Content [W85/1-2]1. John Fitz, John Amadas, John Servyngton, John Williams, Richard Drake, Walter Browne.2. a) William Cooper and b) Walter Harry Lands in Tavistock
 
Dame Elizabeth Harris gave a mill at Gitcombe, together with a house and garden, so that the rents could be given to the poor.
 
Reference: 48/14/94/3 Devon Record OfficeCreation dates: 2 November 1559 Scope and Content TOTNES Bargain and Sale 1 Elizabeth I(1) Edwarde Harrys of Corneworthye, gent.Agnes his wife(2) Luke Sereytt of Greate Tottenes, marchauntMessuage within the gate of Greate Tottenes, on the east of the tenement of the heirs of John Bogan, on the west of the tenement of the heirs of Nycholas Smyth, on the north of the street and on the south of the lands sometime belonging to Totnes Priory. Also the moiety of a close of land lying outside the West Gate, on the east of Elwyll Mede, on the west of the way leading from Tottenes to Harpershyll, on the north of Leche Waye and on the south of 2 little meadows late in the tenure of Nicholas Smyth and of Dewans Screche, wid.Consideration: £70.
 
 
1584 Reference: ME/776Creation dates: 22nd February 1584 Physical characteristics: (Partly mutilated by damp)Scope and Content Letters patent exemplification of commission to Ric. Denys, Kt., John Chicester, Kt., Richard Edgcumbe of Calstock, Esq., Ric. Spargoe Esq., John Fortescue, Esq., Edward Harris of Carnworthy, Esq. Thos. Harris, Esq., Walter Heale, Esq., to enquire into concealed chantry lands at Plymouth alias Sutton, Bickington (Devon), Maker, Dartmouth, Totnes, Lansallos, Lostwithiel, Liskeard and Jabyns and Tregarthens chantries in St. Andrew's Church Plymouth. With interrogatories and evidence of witnesses. Seal of Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer
 
 
In 1633 Dame Elizabeth Harris left $40 per annum to charity and religious causes - this charitable arrangement continued into modern times in the town. In 1679 the manor of Cornworthy, that had previously belonged to the Boone family of Dartmouth, was sold by the Earl and Countess of Warrington to John Harris, Esquire who then sold it to John Seale esquire of Dartmouth. Known details of the Harris of Cornworthy family are:
 
1 Walter Harris of Cornwall and Monmouthshire had one known son
 

1.1 Sir Edward Harris of Cornwall, who died at Cornworthy on the 8th of April 1592, and was buried there on the 10th of April:

 
  
This worthy Gentleman deceased
This life the seventeenth
Daye of May in the year
Of our Lord God
1610
1611
Here lieth the Right Worshipful Sr Thomas
Harris Knight Sargat at Lawe
And The Ladye Elizabeth His wife
Wyth There Foure Children. There
Eldest Sonne Edward [Here follow
two obliterated lines, apparently deliberately
obliterated.*] There seconde Sonne
Christopher Slayne in the Warres at
Zealand in Flaunder and Their
Eldest daughter Anne married to
Sr Thomas Souphwell―a Knight
of Suffolk. And Their youngest
Daughter Honer Married to
Sr Hugh Harris a Knight of Scotland.
 
 He is recorded as having married twice:
 
 To Phillipa Vowell
 
 
Alice BRAKENBERYE, executrix and late the wife of William Middleton, v. Edward HARRYS, gentleman.: Tenements in Plymouth and Cornworthy late of Thomas Vowell, deceased, father of complainant and father-in-law of defendant.: DEVON. 1553-1555
 
 Edward HARRYS of Cornworthy, gentleman, v. William GILES.: Share of a ship bought by both parties of Thomas Stewckley, gentleman.: DEVON. 1556-1558
 
 Reference: PH/7 Creation dates: 7 June, 1597Scope and Content Marriage Articles (Copy) Marr. between E. Harris and E. Fowell. Competent jointure for latter. £1,233 - 6s. - 8d. A. Fowell - i for marriage portion.(i) Thos. Harris, Esq., sergeant-at-law and his s. and hr. apparent, Edwd. Harris, gent.(ii) Arthur Fowell, Esq. of Fowells Combe, Devon and dtr. Eliz. FowellThos. Harris cov. with Arthur Fowell before St. Andrew's feast day (30 Nov.) to convey inter alia to him - manor of Colquite for use of Thos. Harris for life, then s. Edwd. and hrs. male.Witd.: Thos. Pagett, Thos. Reynell, Geo. Reynell, Christopher Freeman, John Cannton.Endsd. at foot:(a) 'Sealed wth. a seale at armes on bothe the seales being the twelve half moones wth. a crosse barre thorough the midst of them'.(b) Note that above a true copy of original deed which assigned manor of Corneworthy in Devon and other lands for jointure of Eliz. Fowell 'and in full recompence of her dower', 'Quinto Junij 1618 Ext. per Edm. Sawyer. Tobie Mathewe Scr. Robert Parke servant to the said scr.'.
 
 To Agnes (Ann) Huckmore
 
 Reference: 48/14/94/3Devon Record OfficeCreation dates: 2 November 1559Scope and Content TOTNES Bargain and Sale 1 Elizabeth I(1) Edwarde Harrys of Corneworthye, gent.Agnes his wife(2) Luke Sereytt of Greate Tottenes, marchauntMessuage within the gate of Greate Tottenes, on the east of the tenement of the heirs of John Bogan, on the west of the tenement of the heirs of Nycholas Smyth, on the north of the street and on the south of the lands sometime belonging to Totnes Priory. Also the moiety of a close of land lying outside the West Gate, on the east of Elwyll Mede, on the west of the way leading from Tottenes to Harpershyll, on the north of Leche Waye and on the south of 2 little meadows late in the tenure of Nicholas Smyth and of Dewans Screche, wid.Consideration: £70.
 
 Descendants of the Harris/Vowell line are:
 
 1.1.1 Sir Thomas Harris, Knight was born 1547 in Cornworthy, died on the 17th o f May, and was buried on the 25th May 1610 at the Cornworthy Parish Church.. Elizabeth Pomeroy who married Sit Thomas Harris of Cornworthy was buried at Cornworthy 18 Apr 1634.
 
  
 
 
 
Colquite Estate, St Mabyn, Cornwall On 28 March, 1587 he leased it to Henry lord Howard for two lives (PH/2), and on the following day ceded the manor to his brother for 89 years. Henry lord Howard agreed to stand seized of Colquite to the use of his son-in-law Arthur Gorges in 1589 (PH/3). Before his death in 1590 Henry lord Howard had assigned his interest to his son-in-law, who, after an earlier assignment, (PH/4) mortgaged the manor of Colquite to Thomas Harris, sergeant-at-law in 1594. This became absolute the same year (PH/6). Thomas Harris made a settlement of the manor in 1597 on his son's marriage (PH/7) and in 1603 conveyed it outright to his son Edward Harris (PH/8).[from Administrative History] Edward Harris conveyed Colquite to Sir Henry Spiller in 1618 (PH/10) for the consideration of £2000 paid by Thomas Howard Earl of Suffolk, the kinsman and heir of the last Viscount Bindon who died in 1610.
 
 Reference: DD\BR\dt/5 CHEW MAGNA, STOWEY, ETC. deeds Creation dates: 1602-1623Extent and Form: 9 docts. Scope and Content Manors of Stowey and Bickfield with their capital messuages, demesnes, etc., in Stowey, Compton Martin (incl. Bickfield and Moreton) Chew Stoke, Midsomer Norton, and the reputed castle of Mudstoke in Chew Magna.The earliest deed is a conveyance of a moiety of the property from Thos. Harrys of Cornworthy (co.Devon) to Thos. Jones of Wrington, and there are settlements of 1623 and an inquisition of later the same year concerning his estates.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 Reference: PH/264 Creation dates: 5 November, 1602 Scope and Content Reversionary lease. (99 yrs. or 3 lives) £4 (ii - i) Rents: 2s. 6d. Heriot, best beast or 2s.6d. Suit of court.(i) Sir Thos. Harries, kt., serjeant-at-law(ii) Walter Jorie of St. Mabyn, tailor.(i - ii) -- cottage and ten. called Helland Bridge and gdn., part of manor of Colquite in ten. and occ. Margery Tooker, widow. (Term to begin on death of M. Tooker. Lives: (ii) and w. Mary and s. Nicholas. (ii) to keep in repair).Fragment of seal on tag. Witd.: Edwd. Pudley, Jn. Wright, George Berd.Endsd.: Memorandum of (ii) for quiet enjoyment of premises to Margery Tooker during her lifetime.
 
 Reference: PH/8 Creation dates: 1 October, 1603 Scope and Content Release. For release of annuity of £140 granted by i to ii and w. Eliz.Cons. ii - i (tear in deed) hundred pounds.(i) Sir Thos. Harrys of Corneworthy, Devon, Kt., sergeant-at-law(ii) Edwd. Harrys, Esq. of the Middle Temple, his s.(i - ii) -- estate and right in manor of Colquite Seal on tag. Witd.: Humfry Englishe, Edwd. Pudsey, Jyles Hed, Thos. Harris.Attached: letters of attorney of 10 Oct. 1603 of i apptg. Ric. Barrett, Esq. and Jn. Barrett, gent. to deliver seisin to ii. Seal
 
 
 
 
 1611 Reference: 2089/1/2/21 Licence of Alienation (letters patent)Creation dates: 7 February 1611/12Language: LatinScope and Content 1. Thomas Harries, sergeant-in-law; Randle (Ranulpho) Crewe; William Jones, esqs.2. Thomas Chamberlayne; John Walter; William Ravenscroft, esqs.Of site of abbey of Buyldwas, etc. (as specified in 2089/1/2/15.
 
 In 1594 he acquired the manor of Colquite in Devon, details of which are hereunder.
 
 The Manor of Colquite: perhaps a temporary possession of the Arundells in the 1470s (AR/2/426, AR/2/448). Colquite was in the fee of Cardinham, however, and so the Dinhams may have held it briefly during the minority of an heir and been the source of the Colquite documents in the archive. Manorial centre was in St Mabyn
 
 The detailed (and complicated) descent of the manor of Colquite is printed in Sir John Maclean's History of the Deanery of Trigg Minor, ii (1876), 475-484. At the time of the Domesday Survey it belonged to Robert Count of Mortain and was held under him by Richard de Tracy. A Thomas de Tracy in the 13th century married Isolda, daughter of Andrew of Cardinham and when he died without heirs the lands were conveyed by his widow to the Dynham family who held the fees in chief for several centuries. The family of Sergaux held Colquite by military service from the Dynhams. At the partition of the Sergaux lands at the end of the 14th century the manor of Colquite went by marriage to the Marny family of Layer Marny in Essex. They held it until 1525 when the Marny estates were partitioned between two coheiresses. One of them married Thomas Howard, second son of Thomas third Duke of Norfolk, created (1559) Viscount Bindon. By an Act of Parliament in 1540 relating to the partition of Lord Marny's estates Colquite went to Thomas Howard and his wife and another Act of 1547 laid down that Thomas Howard, one of Viscount Bindon's sons, should enjoy Colquite for life on his father's death. An attempt was made to sell inter alia the manor of Colquite according to the terms of an Act of 1575 relating to the debts of Viscount Bindon and his son Henry, but a sufficient price could not be raised. Consequently after Thomas Viscount Bindon's death in 1582 Colquite went to his son Thomas Howard according to the Act of 1547. Thomas' elder brother Henry succeeded to the title and at least as early as 1583 Thomas Howard agreed to convey to his brother the manor of Colquite (PH/1). On 28 March, 1587 he leased it to Henry lord Howard for two lives (PH/2), and on the following day ceded the manor to his brother for 89 years. Henry lord Howard agreed to stand seized of Colquite to the use of his son-in-law Arthur Gorges in 1589 (PH/3). Before his death in 1590 Henry lord Howard had assigned his interest to his son-in-law, who, after an earlier assignment, (PH/4) mortgaged the manor of Colquite to Thomas Harris, sergeant-at-law in 1594. This became absolute the same year (PH/6). Thomas Harris made a settlement of the manor in 1597 on his son's marriage (PH/7) and in 1603 conveyed it outright to his son Edward Harris (PH/8).
 
 Edward Harris conveyed Colquite to Sir Henry Spiller in 1618 (PH/10) for the consideration of £2000 paid by Thomas Howard Earl of Suffolk, the kinsman and heir of the last Viscount Bindon who died in 1610.
 
 Thomas who married Elizabeth Pomeroy had four children She was buried at Cornworthy 18 Apr 1634. Thomas Harris was born about 1547, died 1610:
 
 1.1.1.1 Sir Edward Harris, born c 1575,married Elizabeth Fowell. Sir Edward Harris was buried firstly at the Parish Church of Kilcredan, County of Cork in Ireland and then re-interred in the Cornworthy Parish Church. He died soon the 21st of August 1638. He was a Judge and Member of Parliament, and Chief Justice of the Irish Province of Munster.
 
 Creation dates: 2 November 1559Scope and Content TOTNES Bargain and Sale 1 Elizabeth I(1) Edwarde Harrys of Corneworthye, gent.Agnes his wife(2) Luke Sereytt of Greate Tottenes, marchauntMessuage within the gate of Greate Tottenes, on the east of the tenement of the heirs of John Bogan, on the west of the tenement of the heirs of Nycholas Smyth, on the north of the street and on the south of the lands sometime belonging to Totnes Priory. Also the moiety of a close of land lying outside the West Gate, on the east of Elwyll Mede, on the west of the way leading from Tottenes to Harpershyll, on the north of Leche Waye and on the south of 2 little meadows late in the tenure of Nicholas Smyth and of Dewans Screche, wid.Consideration: £70.
 
 Reference: PH/7 Creation dates: 7 June, 1597 Scope and Content Marriage Articles (Copy) Marr. between E. Harris and E. Fowell. Competent jointure for latter. £1,233 - 6s. - 8d. A. Fowell - i for marriage portion.(i) Thos. Harris, Esq., sergeant-at-law and his s. and hr. apparent, Edwd. Harris, gent.(ii) Arthur Fowell, Esq. of Fowells Combe, Devon and dtr. Eliz. FowellThos. Harris cov. with Arthur Fowell before St. Andrew's feast day (30 Nov.) to convey inter alia to him - manor of Colquite for use of Thos. Harris for life, then s. Edwd. and hrs. male.Witd.: Thos. Pagett, Thos. Reynell, Geo. Reynell, Christopher Freeman, John Cannton. (a) 'Sealed wth. a seale at armes on bothe the seales being the twelve half moones wth. a crosse barre thorough the midst of them'.(b) Note that above a true copy of original deed which assigned manor of Corneworthy in Devon and other lands for jointure of Eliz. Fowell 'and in full recompence of her dower', 'Quinto Junij 1618 Ext. per Edm. Sawyer. Tobie Mathewe Scr. Robert Parke servant to the said scr.'.
 
 Reference: PH/10 Creation dates: 21 May, 1618 Scope and Content Bargain and Sale (enrolled) With covenant to levy a fine. £2000 Thos. Earl of Suffolk, Lord High Treasurer to i. (i) Edwd. Harris, Esq., Chief Justice of the Province of Munster in the Kingdom of Ireland (ii) Hen. Spiller and Michael Humfreis of London, esquires.(i - ii) -- manor of Colquite (with deeds and evidences at cost of Thos. Earl of Suffolk) except mess. in St. Kew occ. Moyse, Mess. in St. Minver occ. Thomas, mess. in St. Teath occ. Hambly, mess. in Davidstowe occ. Gedy, patronage and advowson of a prebend in Endellion (Endillion).Seal of i on tag.Witd.: Hugh Pyne, Edm. Sawyer, Mathew Coningsby, Reignolde Billinge, Mathew Leighton.
 
 Reference: PH/11 Creation dates: 31 May, 1618 Physical characteristics: (Mostly partially illegible); (Witnesses names only legible in part). Scope and Content Feoffment (torn away on one side) from Edwd. Harris to Hen. Spiller and Michael Humfreis.-- manor of Colquite (with exceptions of PH/10) Seal (arm., incomplete) on tag.Witd.: Hugh Pyne.Endsd.: (i) Note of manor court of Colquite held at John Dynham's (a tenant's) house 13 August, 1618 where deed was read and tenants attorned. (Tenants Jn. Roscarrocke, Esq., Chris. Pollard, gent., Jn. Plumley, gent., Giles Hamley, gent., Reg. Billing, gent., Alex. Hamley, Wm. Luggar, Robt. Pawle, Wm. Blake, Robt. Hamley, sen., Robt. Hamley, jun., Ric. Tamlyn, Nich. Vivian, Thomasine Hamley, widow, Wm. Pawle, Wm. Mountsteven, Giles Trebell, Gilbert Marshall, Jn. Dynham, Humfry Maye, Jn. Bettye, Giles Birrye, Jn. Rounsevall, Hen. Bennett, Thos. Blake, Hugh Edye, Jn. Maye, Peter Harr (? y or ? is). Witd.: Hugh Pyne, Jn. Molesworth, Geo. Moore, Jn. Roscarrocke, etc. and 10 others(ii) Note how deed was torn by mischance 20 August, 1618.
 
 His children by this marriage were Edward, Ann, Christopher and Honor.
 
 Reference: PH/14 Creation dates: 9 April, 1619 Scope and Content Covenant to levy a fine and suffer a recovery. (Bargain and Sale enrolled). 'Competent sum', ii - i. (i) Thos. Earl of Suffolk, and s. and hr. Theophilus, Lord Walden (ii) Sir Ric. Weston of Roxwell, kt.; Sir Hen. Spiller of London, kt. (i - ii) -- manor of Colquite with exceptions of PH/10; sold by Edwd. Harris, Esq. 2 seals (armorial) on tags Witd.: Hen. Career r, J. Gibbon Math. Leighton
 
 Edward Harris married Elizabeth Fowell. And had four sons and three daughters, including Mary who married William Greatrakes. William Greatrakes had a son Valentine:
 
  Mr. Greatrakes married Mary, third daughter (by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Arthur Fowell, of Fowellscombe, Co. Devon, Esq.) of Sir Edward Harris, Knight, second Justice of the King's Bench, Ireland, and subsequently Chief Justice of Munster.10 Her memory is embalmed in the following tribute of her son, Valentine-
 
 "My Mother was the Daughter of Sir Edward Harris, Knight, one of his late Majesty's Justices of the King's Bench in the Kingdom of Ireland, who had the reputation of a learned and just judge; and this I dare say of her (who died some few years past, for I do but justice to her memory), she was a virtuous and discreet Woman, an excellent neighbour, and a most indulgent and provident Parent; she took care of my Education (my Father dying when I was tender in years)"
 
  Valentine Greatrakes was born on 14 February 1628 at the family home at Norrisland, New Affane, County Waterford. His parents were William Greatrakes and Mary Harris, daughter of Sir Edward Harris, 2nd Justice of the Kings Bench in Ireland and Chief Justice of Munster. After the Munster Plantation Valentine's grandfather had settled in County Waterford from Derbyshire. At the outbreak of the Munster Rebellion in 1641, his mother decided to move the family to England to live with her brother Edward in Devon. In 1647 Valentine returned to Ireland: 'I returned to my native country which at that time was in a most miserable and deplorable state, for then it was not as formerly, a National Quarrel, Irish against English, Protestants against Papists, but there were high and strange divisions ...English against English, Irish against Irish, and Protestants and Papists joining hands in one Province against Protestants of another'. He lived at Cappoquin Castle for a year in 'contemplation'.
 
In 1649 he became lieutenant in the Cromwellian army in the Earl of Orrery's regiment. On leaving the army in 1654 he returned to the family home: 'I betook myself to a Country Life...and got by my industry a livelihood out of the Earth and daily employed many poor people'. He was appointed Clerk of the Peace for Co. Cork and Register of Transplantation. In 1661 he was involved in a noted witchcraft trial in Youghal Co. Cork. Florence Newton of Youghal was accused of 'bewitching' one Mary Langdon. Greatrakes and other officials carried out a series of gruesome tests (lancing her skin and sticking awls into her body) to prove she was a witch.
 
In 1663 at the age of 34, Valentine "had an impulse or strange persuasion....which did very frequently suggest to me that there was bestowed on me a gift of curing the Kings Evil (a disfiguring skin disease known as Scrofula). Valentine's first patient was a young boy, William Maher of Salterbridge, Cappoquin who suffered from Scrofula. 'I laid my hands on the place affected, and prayed to God for Jesus sake to heal him and within a month ... was perfectly healed, and so continues God be praised'. For three years he concentrated on curing Scrofula. In 1665 he had a further experience leading him to believe that he could cure many other diseases. His fame as a healer spread quickly and he was inundated with people visiting his home. He was forced to move to Youghal 'where great multitudes resorted to me, not only of the inhabitants, but also out of England'. One of these English visitors was John Flamstead (The astronomer?) who travelled from England for a cure for an unspecified illness. He met Greatrakes at his home and described him thus: 'He had a kind of majestical yet affable presence, a lusty body and composed carriage'.
 
Greatrakes was summoned before the Bishop's Court in Lismore to explain about his activities. He was ordered to cease his healing sessions, but after a few days he decided to ignore their advice. Greatrakes was popularly known as 'The Stroker' because of his method of stroking his patients with his hands.
 
In 1666 Edward Conway of Ragley Hall in Warwickshire learned about the Irish healer who was creating a sensation with his remarkable cures. Conway's wife Lady Anne had suffered for many years with severe headaches and could not find relief. Lord Conway contacted Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and asked him to use his influence to persuade Greatrakes to visit Ragley. Greatrakes agreed with reluctance and arrived at Ragley Hall on 27 January 1665. The Conways counted amongst their friends some of the most noted physicians, philosophers, scientists and spiritualists in England. A distinguished group gathered at Ragley to witness Greatrakes attempt to cure Lady Anne Conway. He was unsuccessful with Lady Conway but he was asked to stay at Ragley for a month and is said to have cured many. While there he was invited to Worcester to visit Charles II at Whitehall. He attracted huge crowds in London and Robert Boyle witnessed many of his healing sessions. His supporters and detractors published several pamphlets and ballads concerning his healing. Greatrakes wrote to Lord Conway in May 1666: 'The Virtuosi have been daily with me... and God has been pleased to do wonderful things in their sight. Sir Heneage Finch says that I have made the greatest faction and disturbance between clergy and laymen that anyone has these 1000 years'.
 
In 1666 Greatrakes published an account of his life and cures titled 'A Brief Account of Mr. Valentine Greatrakes and Divers of the Strange Cures by him lately performed. Written by himself in a letter Addressed to the Honourable Robert Boyle, Esq.,' This publication gives us a valuable insight into Greatrakes life and healing methods. It includes an etching of Greatrakes curing William Maher of Salterbridge.
 
Greatrakes returned to England for further visits but it is not known when he stopped his healing sessions.
 
His funeral entry at the Herald's Office, Dublin recorded that he died on 28 November 1682 at Affane, Co. Waterford and was buried in Lismore Church. However, the Rev. Samuel Hayman writing in the 1860's stated that he is buried in the aisle of the old Affane Church near to his father.
 
Armore Castle and Sir Edward Harris
 
  By the early part of the 17th century Sir Edward Harris lived at Armore Castle. He is said to have lived in a style of cumbrous magnificence like a feudal noble. He had a numerous family of one son and twelve daughters and whenever he went to visit any of the nobility or gentry of the country he rode at the head of so numerous a train that it covered a mile of ground. One enduring memory of him is a well near the gate of the Protestant church known as Justices well. He had 70 brood mares of a particular breed.
 
 In 1698 the castle was besieged and taken by Lord Broghill, son of the Great Earl of Cork.
 
 1.1.1.2 Ann Harris
 
 Anne Harris was born before 22nd August 1574 at Cornworthy, married Sir Thomas Southwell in June 1621 and had two children Elizabeth Southwell and Frances Southwell. She is buried at the Cornworthy parish church.
 
  Lady Anne Southwells, nee Harris, first husband was Sir Thomas Southwell of Spixworth, Norfolk,nephew of Robert Southwell, poet and martyr. For some years she lived in Ireland with her husband where he was an English planter in Munster. At his death in 1626 Lady Southwell married Captain Henry Sibthorpe, privy councillor of Munster. She died in Acton Middlesex on 2nd October 1636.
 
 Thomas SOUTHWELL, son of Alice Cornwallis and Richard Southwell, was born 1575, Wood Rising, Norfolk, England and died 12 Jun 1626
 
 Thoroton, in his history of Nottinghamshire, deduces the pedigree of this family from Simon de Southwell, in the reign of Henry III, through Sir John de Southwell, in that of Edward I; Robert de Southwell, in that of Edward II; and so on to that of Henry VI, when most of this family migrated from Nottinghamshire into Norfolk, Suffolk, and Sussex. Of these were Sir Robert Southwell, master of the rolls to Henry VIII; and Sir Richard Southwell, privy counsellor to the same King. In the reign of James I, two of the Southwells, Thomas and Anthony, went on the King's affairs into Ireland, where they both became the progenitors of a numerous issue. One of their descendants, according to Camden, was ennobled by the title of Viscount Castle Maltress, of the county of Limerick (also see Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage Baronetage and Knightage page 2110-2111, however some dates are not correct). The principal branch of the Southwells which remained in England, we are informed by the same authority, seated themselves at King's Weston in Gloucestershire, in the year 1678, having purchased that manor just before. In Thoroton, is also recorded one John de Southwell, alias Fysher, (more probably John le Fysher de Southwell) to whom Arundel, archbishop of York, in the nineteenth of Richard II, granted the inn, known by the name of the Saracen's head, which was an escheat to the Archbishop, in right of his manor of Southwell. Of this family, I find, in other authorities, John de Southwell, member of parliament for Lewes, temp. Henry VIII; Sir Richard de Southwell one of the executors of the last will of Thomas, the famous duke of Norfolk, who died in the second year of Queen Mary; Sir Robert Southwell of Woodrising, in the county of Norfolk, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Lord Howard of Effingham, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth; besides many other of inferior consequence. Among the MSS. Bennet' college library, is a curious letter dated Sep. 16, 1580, from John Southwell of Ipswich, to the Archbishop of Canterbury. In Lincoln cathedral two of the family, High and William, the former spelt Southwell, the latter Suwell, are buried. The were both prebendaries of that church, Hugh in 1406, but the stone on which the other was recorded, had no date.
 
 Anne was present at the death of Queen Elizabeth the 1st on the 24th of March 1603. A ghastly incident occurred two days later which Anne, noted in her diary. "last night whilst the ladies were in their places watching about the queens corpse which was fast nailed up in a board coffin, with leaves of lead covered with velvet, her body burst with such a crack that it splitted the wood, lead and cerecloth, so that to-day she was fain to be new trimmed up."
 
 Anne (1573-1636), daughter of Sir Thomas Harris of Cornworthy in Devon, who married in 1593 Sir Thomas Southwell, of Spixworth, Norfolk, nephew of the Catholic poet and martyr Robert Southwell, and 2ndly. in 1626 Captain Henry Sibthorpe, Sergeant-Major and Privy Councillor of the Province of Munster in Ireland. She kept a Commonplace Book, now in the Folger Shakespeare Library, which includes her own poetry along with extracts from her reading and a list of 100 books compiled after her death by her husband, many of which must have belonged to her (Sister Jean Carmel Cavanaugh, "The Library of Lady Southwell and Captain Sibthorpe", in Studies in Bibliography, 20, 1967, pp. 243-54). Jean Klénè, editor of The Southwell-Sibthorpe Commonplace Book, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, vol. 147 (University of Arizona, 1997) argues that Lady Anne Southwell is definitely the author of the "Answere to the very Countrey Newes" (A. S.) which replies to John Donne's "Newes from the verie Countrey" and probably also of the "Answere to the Court Newes" (unsigned) which replies to Overbury's "Newes from Court". Klene thinks the edicts may be by another Lady Southwell (Elizabeth) but considering Anne's contributions to the "Newes" she seems to us the more likely candidate.All the early editions are rare on the market today and this is probably the earliest reasonably obtainable with the additional Webster characters and the John Donne "Newes".Literature: Murphy (Gwendolen), Bibliography of English Character-Books, p. 20 (edition h); Paylor (W. J.), "The Editions of the 'Overburian' Characters", in The Library, XVII (1936-7), pp. 340-8; White (Beatrice), Cast of Ravens: The Strange Case of Sir Thomas Overbury (London, 1965).
 
 Ann and Thomas Southwell had two children, Elizabeth SOUTHWELL b. 1599 married Edward Dowdal and Frances SOUTHWELL b. 1601 - d. 1643) who married William Lenthall
  
1.1.1.3 Christopher - was slain in battle at Ostend, Flanders, Europe.
  
Ostend, one of the bloodiest events of the Eighty Years' War. Described as a 'long carnival of death', it lasted an exhausting three years, two months and seventeen days. The Eighty Years' War (1568–1648) was the war of the Netherlands independence from Spain. Spanish rule had been imposed on the Netherlands in 1519 when Charles V was crowned Holy Roman emperor and king of Spain. Discontent at this rule lead to a revolution in 1567, resulting in the separation of the northern and southern Netherlands. While the south remained Spanish, the north formed the United Provinces of the Netherlands (the Dutch Republic). At war, the United Provinces met with early success in securing Holland and Zeeland, but the union was weakened in 1579 by the defection of the Catholic Walloon provinces. Under the command of Alessandro Farnese, the Spanish had reconquered the southern part of the Netherlands by 1588. In 1598 Philip II granted the sovereignty of the Netherlands to his daughter Isabella and her husband, Archduke Albert of Austria. They continued the war against the northern provinces with the aim of ultimately uniting the Netherlands.
 
Ostend was fortified in 1583 and by the end of the sixteenth century was the only possession of the Republic in Flanders. From this strategically important position, the Dutch could inflict much damage on the surrounding Spanish territory. Even more crucially, control of Ostend meant control of the coast. Therefore, in 1601, Albert decided to besiege the town, stating that he would spend eighteen years doing so if need be.
 
 The siege began on 5 July 1601 and became infamous for the heroism, bloodshed and sheer endurance of both sides. As Simoni says, 'among the many battles, sieges, naval encounters and all manner of other military engagements of the Eighty Years' War, none was, and perhaps is, more famous than the long drawn-out siege of Ostend in which the Spaniards assailed the unassailable and the Dutch defended the indefensible'.
  
1.1.1.4 Honour Harris was born before 1578, married a Sir Hugh Harris, who was, according to the visitations of Devon from Scotland, and was buried at Cornworthy.
 
 Descendants of the Harris/Huckmore line
 
Sir Edward Harris and Agnes or Anne Huckmore had five children:
  
1.1.5 Edward Harris born in Cornworthy, died after 1638
  
1619 Reference: 263/7 Creation dates: 17 June 1619 Scope and Content Lease for 99 years 1 Sir Edward Harris, knight 2 Stephen Waymouth of Cornworthy, yeoman Messuage, moiety of an orchard. Closes called Beane Park, Millpark, Thorne, Tennyswell, Butts, Bulley's meadow, Aesapark, Crowell deche, Berra Torr, Little Woodland Consideration: £55 Rent: 13s 4d p.a.
 
 1.1.6 John Harris born in Cornworthy, and died after 1638. He was named in the will of his brother Arthur. He had one child
 
 1.1.6.1 Thomas Harris who died after 1638. He was named in the will of his uncle Arthur. Sir Thomas Harris. He was the son and heir, and was named in the will of his great uncle, Arthur Harris of Cherston Devonshire, one of the sons by his great grandfathers 2nd marriage and half -brother to his grandfather, Sir Thomas Harris. He was born in 1598 at Cornworthy and died in June 1665, being buried on the 22nd of June in that year at Cornworthy.
 
 1.1.7 Arthur Harris born in Cornworthy, and died in September or October 1640, being buried at Churchstowe, near Aveton Gifford, on the 2nd of October 1640. He was married twice, firstly to Phillipa Duke and then to Honor Wykes on the 30th June 1586 at South Tawton, close to the Harris of Hayne area. His will dated was dated the 20th of April 1638, and proved on the 8th of October 1640. 1613
 
 Reference: 123M/L499 Creation dates: [1613]Scope nd Content 25 February 10 James Counterpart lease for 99 years or 3 lives Lessee: Arthur Harris of Churchstow gent. Fine: £160.Premises: The Lord's Woodde now in possession of Lord Petre with soil, pasture and herbage, reserving timber and staddells or standards, but with power to fell coppice and underwood, and lessee may uproot all trees now growing and the motes or stubs of trees in six Acres, parcel of the wood demised, lying in East side of the same and adjoining the free lands late Leighes now Mr.Crokers, and make clean for meadow or pasture, and use the said trees for the repair and new building of Norton farm house, the cleaned part to be hedged and fenced, the overplus of trees to be at Lord Petre's disposition.Lives: Phillippe wife of lessee, Arthur and Edward Fortescue sons of Henry Fortescue of Cornworthy. Rent 40s., from Annunciation 1613 lessee is to live in Norton farmhouse.
 
  1.1.8 William Harris was born before April 1562 and died in January 1594 or 95, and was buried in that month at Beer Ferris
  
1.1.9 Sussanna (Suzan) Harris was born before 20th January 1565/66, married Henry Fortescue on the 5th of June 1586 at Cornworthy and died in 1638. She had at least two children, Arthur and Edward. Arthur Fortescue had at least three children, Susan, Arthur and Edward. 1586
 
 A descendant of the family, Mary Harris, widow of John Harris was living at Exeter in the early 1700s
  
Reference: 69/M/2/624Creation dates: 10 December 1718Scope and Content Assignment of mortgage for £8400 [Release from a Lease and Release]1) Sir John Lambert of London, baronet, Sir Randolph Knipe, Sir John Williams, Sir William Chapman, all of [London], knights, and Samuel Clark, Benjamin Lethienllier and Richard Merry of London, merchants 2) Henry Portman of Orchard, Somerset, esquire3) Mary Harris of Exeter, widow of John HarrisTenement called Windsor in Crediton.Also a tenement late the property of Nathaniel Adams in Crediton. Also tenements and lands called Spruce Park and But Park with barn adjoining, situated near Bowden Hill. Also a tenement late in the possession of Robert Lock the elder. Also a tenement and barn at Bowden Hill. Also a dwelling house situated on the east side of the highway from Crediton to Exeter. Also a close of land called Fair Park situated near Windsor. Also Three closes of land with appurtenances situated near Darte Downs. Also Knighton tenement and Woodlands alias Woodhouse tenement, in East Allington, Loddiswell and Buckland Tout Saints. Also hundred of Coleridge with all its rights, members, liberties, franchises and appurtenances. ¼ part of the manor of Cornworthy Also the barton farm of Cornworthy. Also ¼ part of the lands of Charles Boon esquire, deceased in the villages or places of Cornworthy, West and East Cornworthy and Allhaleigh alias Alleigh alias Allhallowleigh. Also ¼ part of Mount Boon tenement with lands belonging to the same, in Townstall. Also a waste plot of ground on the east side of a plot adjoining highway from Dartmouth to Townstall Church in the, with Long Orchard adjoining. Also ¼ part of premises belonging to the same, and of one orchard and hop garden and several fields called Collings Close alias Well Close, the Plumb Meadow, the Brickfield, the Pathfield, the Great and Little Grattons, the Great Langwell, the Square Close, the Stray Park, the Long Close, the Little Square Close, the Cayfield, the Lower and Higher Slade. Also ¼ part of fields called Redwells, the Plain Meadow, Oldwalls and Wheelers. Also ¼ part of a moiety of a tenement called Townstaal and of fields called Two Furze Hills, the Three Corner Furze Fields, the Path Field, The Quarry Park, The Little Close and the Well Park, The Great and Little Rock Parks, the Oad Close, the Little Quillets, the Long Closes and the Church Park. Also ¼ part of a moiety of four tenements in the town and borough of Clifton, Dartmouth Hardness. Also ¼ part of lands formerly of Thomas Boon, John Boon, Charles Boon and Dame Jane Foche situated in Cornworthy, East and West Cornworthy, Allhaleigh, Townstal, Clifton, Dartmouth and Hardness
 
 
 References
 
(From: 'Parishes: Colyton - Culmstock', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), pp. 129-51. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk
 
 
Sir John Maclean's History of the Deanery of Trigg Minori (1876)