Hardys Cottage Garden Plants

    cottage garden
  • The cottage garden is a distinct style of garden that uses an informal design, traditional materials, dense plantings, and a mixture of ornamental and edible plants. English in origin, the cottage garden depends on grace and charm rather than grandeur and formal structure.
  • A carefree garden packed with colorful flowers and herbs; often accented with a picket fence, arbors and rustic ornaments.
    hardys
  • The Hardy Boyz (also known as The Hardys and Team Xtreme) were a professional wrestling tag team in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) that consisted of real life brothers Matt and Jeff Hardy.
    plants
  • A place where an industrial or manufacturing process takes place
  • (plant) buildings for carrying on industrial labor; "they built a large plant to manufacture automobiles"
  • A living organism of the kind exemplified by trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses, ferns, and mosses, typically growing in a permanent site, absorbing water and inorganic substances through its roots, and synthesizing nutrients in its leaves by photosynthesis using the green pigment chlorophyll
  • (plant) (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
  • (plant) put or set (seeds, seedlings, or plants) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden"
  • A small organism of this kind, as distinct from a shrub or tree
hardys cottage garden plants hardys cottage garden plants - Italian Cypress
Italian Cypress Tree, One Gallon Plant
Italian Cypress Tree, One Gallon Plant
Italian cypress is an outstanding Mediterranean classic with attractive blue green foliage. An ideal conifer to dominate a landscape with its densely branched, narrow columnar form. Evergreen. Full sun. Fast grower to 60 to 80 feet, about 3 feet wide. Makes ideal screen, and invaluable for something tall in very narrow beds. Hardy to USDA zone 7 and all higher zones. Gives great Tuscan effect if used in large containers on sunny deck or patio. Try it near swimming pools. Shipped as a potted one gallon tree in its original soil and container.

Clyne Gardens, Swansea, Wales
Clyne Gardens, Swansea, Wales
From Wikipedia; Clyne Gardens is a botanical garden located in Swansea, Wales, UK. The current park was formed from the landscaped gardens created by Glynn Vivian who purchased the castle in 1860.. The estate passed to his nephew Algernon, 'The Admiral' in 1921 who owned it until his death in 1952. He had the greatest influence on the gardens as we see them today. Clyne Gardens is bordered by Mumbles road and Mayals road in Blackpill and Mayals areas of Swansea with entrances off both these roads. The gardens consist of 19 hectares of land and include over 2,000 different plants including over 800 rhododendrons for which the gardens are renowned. Clyne holds National Collections of Pieris, Enkianthus and Rhododendrons. Due to the cool, wet and temperate local climate many plants thrive here not normally considered hardy for its latitude. The gardens have extensive bog gardens, home to giant Elephant Rhubarb Gunnera manicata and American skunk cabbage. The gazebo to the right of the castle was built by the Admiral to view the incoming ships as they entered Swansea Bay. The gazebo surrounded by a stand of Monterey Pine 'Pinus radiata'. These trees have retained their lower branches which filter the prevailing winds and give greater cover (protection) to the area. A Japanese garden at the top of the gardens holds a red and white painted bridge, many bamboo and an artificial lake with waterfall passing underneath the bridge. The water which rises in Clyne Common, travels under the Japanese Bridge and through the Gardens to join the sea at Blackpill. Alongside the Bridge is a fine specimen of the Handkerchief Tree 'Davidia Involucrata var. vilmoriniana'. The park is scattered with small dogs graves to commemorate the Admiral's family pets. Joy Cottage at the seafront entrance was built as a miniature cottage for the relaxation and education of the Admiral's daughters by nannies employed to teach reading, writing and cookery. Clyne Chapel built by William Graham Vivian, was opened for worship in 1908. Beneath it, in a private vault, Graham Vivian, his sister Dulcie and the Admiral are buried. The tallest recorded Magnolia in Britain 'Magnolia campbellii var. alba' can be found here. The Oak woodland is a remnant of Clyne Forest, an important Norman 11th century historical land feature. Glynn Vivian planted three notable trees still alive in front of the castle - one Wellingtonia 'Sequoiadendron giganteum' and two Monterey Cypress 'Cupressus macrocarpa', one a fastigiate form which is also one of the tallest recorded in Britain.
RHS Chelsea Flower Show
RHS Chelsea Flower Show
Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants The Chelsea Flower Show has been held in the grounds of the Chelsea Hospital every year since 1913, apart from gaps during the two World Wars. It used to be Britain’s largest flower show (it has now been overtaken by Hampton Court), but is still the most prestigious. From the beginning it has contained both nursery exhibits and model gardens. Every year there have been exhibits from foreign countries as well as from Britain. It is the flower show most associated with the Royal family, who attend the opening day every year. Whatever you love about gardening, there’s something for you at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show. ‘Fresh’ is a brand new area that includes modern, inventive gardens with new design ideas, along with tradestands offering ingenious new products.
hardys cottage garden plants
Hardy plants for cottage gardens
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