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GETKEY

Keyword Abbreviation Token (hex) Version(s) Classification
GET KEY G{Shift+E} K{Shift+E} A1 F9 3.5, 7.0 Statement

  Syntax  
GET KEY variable [ , variable ] ...
 
Parameters Type Legal Value(s) Default Value Note(s)
variable String or numeric any except reserved variable Type must be valid for the data that comes from the keyboard
 
  Purpose  
Data input; read a character from the keyboard (perhaps multiple times).

 
  Remarks  
This statement reads single character(s) from the keyboard buffer. If no character is available, GETKEY will wait until one is available (perhaps forever).

Each item read from the keyboard must be compatible with each variable's type.  So a string variable must be specified if text is to be read.  A numeric variable is sometimes used to read numeric values, but often a string variable will be used in these cases too.  This is because if non-numeric characters are read when trying to input into a numeric variable, a TYPE MISMATCH ERROR is generated.  A string variable will accept any character.

To GET a single character without waiting, GET is typically used.
 
Failure to specify at least one variable results in SYNTAX ERROR.
 
GETKEY may only be used as a statement in a program.  Outside of a program (i.e., in direct mode) it will generate ILLEGAL DIRECT ERROR.
 
Trivia: I used the term GETKEY on most of this page to be consistant with other literature, but the GETKEY "keyword" is actually two tokens: GET and KEY which means that (unlike most statements) you may include a space in the "keyword" (but only between GET and KEY).    This is similar to GET # which is actually two tokens, GET and # (contrast with PRINT# and INPUT# which are each a single token).
 
Example:
NEW

READY.
10 GETKEY K$
20 PRINT K$
RUN
 H          the user typed H 

READY.
 
 
  Compare With  
 
  Contrast With  

© H2Obsession, 2014
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