Information for Parents
 

LINKS:

Marks (updated monthly)

Grove Chemistry

Grove Biology

KS3

KS4

KS5

This page provides parents with information on what students are studying in science at KS3 and KS4 (GCSE) and Chemistry at KS5 ('A' level).

The links abovewill take you to Key Stage (KS)-specific student pages that contain internal and external links to syllabus, revision, homework, and extension resources.

KS3

  • 1) LEVELS
  • What do 'levels' mean? #1 - Background..
    The meaning of the numerical levels your child obtains is derived from the research of cognitive scientists - most importantly Benjamin Bloom, who published his "taxonomy of educational objectives" in 1956 (!). Bloom categorised cognitive skills in 6 increasing levels, with 'Knowledge' at the bottom, and 'Evaluation' at the top.
  • Blooms taxonomy was revised in 2001 (see image) - creating the foundation for the 'level ladders' currently used at KS3
  • For an explanation of how these terms relate to KS3 science, click here for 'generalised' examples.
  • What do 'levels' mean? #2 - How do 'levels' describe the attainment of your child?
    • Click here to get an indication of the relationship between knowledge, understanding, application & synthesis for each unit of study in KS3.
    • The QCA (the Government's Qualification & Curriculum authority) has produced descriptions of expectations for each level (1-8) HERE.
  • 2) CURRICULUM
  • The Science National Curriculum is divided essentially into two parts: knowledge and skills:
    • If your child entered secondary school before september 2008,the emphasis will be approximately 60% knowledge to 40% skills ('how science works'). You can view the science curriculum by clicking here. This website sets out what your child will be expected to know, understand & 'do' in their SAT exam in year 9.
    • If your child enters secondary school on or after September 2008, (s)he will be taught the 'new' KS3 curriculum, which you can view here. The 'New' KS3 curriculum places greater emphasis on the acquisition of defined key skills.
  • 3) MARKS
    • You can view your child's science marks here (you will need their 'student number').

KS4
  • GCSE Science links for parents.
    • If you would like your child to go to a 'good' /'top 20' (i.e Russell group) university, the choice of 'A' levels will have a profound affect on their chances. See here (scroll down to the 'greyed' area for subjects that tell a univesity your child has academic ability) and here for lists of academically 'acceptable' 'A' levels.
    • If your child is studying the Y10 curriculum, click here to view his/ her curriculum.
    • If your child is studying the Y11 curriculum, click here to view his/ her curriculum.
    • What jobs can my son/ daughter do with a chemistry/ science qualification? Click here and scroll down to "careers" for ideas.
    • If you want to help with revision, visit the KS4 home page and download the Grove Chemistry revision powerpoint presentations. Students should use these as a starting point for their revision. Research suggests that the best quality revision needs active engagement with the material. This could be through concept mapping, flash cards, mock exam questions; basically any technique that involves active engagement with the topic under study. Passive revision (e.g. reading, watching, listening) can easily be made active by including some 'doing' such as reading AND taking notes of key points, listening then testing ones knowledge (for example on this website).

KS5

  • If you would like your child to go to a 'good' / 'top 20' (i.e Russell group) university, the choice of 'A' levels will have a profound affect on their chances. See here(scroll down to the 'greyed' area for subjects that tell a univesity your child has academic ability) and here for lists of academically 'acceptable' 'A' levels.
  • The Chemistry curriculum at KS5 is changing.
  • Students entering Y13 in 2008 will study the 'old' curriculum.
  • Students entering Y12 in 2008 will study the 'new' curriculum.
  • Click here for links to revision, self-assessment, home study, past exam papers, and careers & university ideas.
  • Please do encourage your son/ daughter to discuss with me any concerns they have about their understanding. The gap between GCSE chemistry and 'A' level Chemistry is broad, and students can often feel overwhelmed by the change in emphasis from knowing facts (GCSE) to using their knowledge. This is a failure of the system, not the student, and experience suggests that most students are able to overcome this to become exceptional, independent life-long learners.