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   had such obscure ways of asking things. The room was oppressively

   small.

  

   Day pressed on with the question, `The fact that you could see you had

   broken the law, and that is what is forcing you to come forward here

   today and tell the truth?'

  

   Yeah. Whatever you want. `OK,' Anthrax started to answer, `That is a

   fair assump--'

  

   Day cut him off. `I just wanted to clarify that because the

   interpretation I immediately got from that was that we, or members of

   the AFP, had unfairly and unjustly forced you to come in here today,

   and that is not the case?'

  

   Define `unfairly'. Define `unjustly'. Anthrax thought it was unfair

   the cops might charge his mother. But they told her it was perfectly

   legal to do so. Anthrax felt light-headed. All these thoughts whirring

   around inside his head.

  

   `No, that is not the case. I'm sorry for ...' Be humble. Get out of

   that room faster.

  

   `No, that is OK. If that is what you believe, say it. I have no

   problems with that. I just like to have it clarified. Remember, other

   people might listen to this tape and they will draw inferences and

   opinions from it. At any point where I think there is an ambiguity, I

   will ask for clarification. Do you understand that?'

  

   `Yes. I understand.' Anthrax couldn't really focus on what Day was

   saying. He was feeling very distressed and just wanted to finish the

   interview.

  

   The cops finally moved on, but the new topic was almost as unpleasant.

   Day began probing about Anthrax's earlier hacking career--the one he

   had no intention of talking about. Anthrax began to feel a bit better.

   He agreed to talk to the police about recent phreaking activities, not

   hacking matters. Indeed, he had repeatedly told them that topic was

   not on his agenda. He felt like he was standing on firmer ground.

  

   After being politely stonewalled, Day circled around and tried again.

   `OK. I will give you another allegation; that you have unlawfully

   accessed computer systems in Australia and the United States. In the

   US, you specifically targeted military computer systems. Do you

   understand that allegation?'

  

   `I understand that. I wouldn't like to comment on it.' No, sir. No

   way.

  

   Day tried a new tack. `I will further allege that you did work with a

   person known as Mendax.'

  

   What on earth was Day talking about? Anthrax had heard of Mendax, but

   they had never worked together. He thought the cops must not have very

   good informants.

  

   `No. That is not true. I know no-one of that name.' Not strictly true,

   but true enough.

  

   `Well, if he was to turn around to me and say that you were doing all