Page 287


Undergound. Go to Table of Contents.

   Day leaned forward, peered at Anthrax and asked, `What did you

   interpret that to mean?'

  

   `That if I don't tell the truth, if I say "no comment" and don't

   cooperate, that it is going to be ... it will mean that you will go

   after me with ...' Anthrax grasped for the right words, but he felt

   tongue-tied, `with ... more force, I guess.'

  

   Both officers stiffened visibly.

  

   Day came back again. `Do you feel that an unfair inducement has been

   placed on you as a result of that?'

  

   `In what sense?' The question was genuine.

  

   `You have made the comment and it has now been recorded and I have to

   clear it up. Do you feel like, that a deal has been offered to you at

   any stage?'

  

   A deal? Anthrax thought about it. It wasn't a deal as in `Talk to us

   now and we will make sure you don't go to jail'. Or `Talk now and we

   won't beat you with a rubber hose'.

  

   `No,' he answered.

  

   `Do you feel that as a result of that being said that you have been

   pressured to come forward today and tell the truth?'

  

   Ah, that sort of deal. Well, of course.

  

   `Yes, I have been pressured,' Anthrax answered. The two police

   officers looked stunned. Anthrax paused, concerned about the growing

   feeling of disapproval in the room. `Indirectly,' he added quickly,

   almost apologetically.

  

   For a brief moment, Anthrax just didn't care. About the police. About

   his father. About the pressure. He would tell the truth. He decided to

   explain the situation as he saw it.

  

   `Because since they came to my house, they emphasised the fact that if

   I didn't come for an interview, that they would then charge my mother

   and, as my mother is very sick, I am not prepared to put her through

   that.'

  

   The police looked at each other. The shock waves reverberated around

   the room. The AFP clearly hadn't bargained on this coming out in the

   interview tape. But what he said about his mother being threatened was

   the truth, so let it be on the record with everything else.

  

   Ken Day caught his breath, `So you are saying that you

   have now been ...' he cut himself off ... `that you are not here

   voluntarily?'

  

   Anthrax thought about it. What did `voluntarily' mean? The police

   didn't cuff him to a chair and tell him he couldn't leave until he

   talked. They didn't beat him around the head with a baton. They

   offered him a choice: talk or inflict the police on his ailing mother.

   Not a palatable choice, but a choice nonetheless. He chose to talk to

   protect his mother.