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   `It's everywhere.' Oops. Don't sound too cocky. `Isn't it?'

  

   `No, I'm not familiar.' Which is just what Anthrax was thinking.

  

   Sexton moved on. `On the back of that document there is more type

   scans ...'

  

   `It's all just the same thing. Just take a note of what is there. In

   this case, box 544 belongs to this woman ...'

  

   `So, once again, you just release this type of information on the

   bridge?'

  

   `Not all of it. Most of it I would probably keep to myself and never

   look at it again. I was bored. Is it illegal to scan?'

  

   `I'm not saying it's illegal. I'm just trying to show that you were

   really into this. I'm building a picture and I am gradually getting to

   a point and I'm going to build a picture to show that for a while

   there ...' Sexton then interrupted himself and veered down a less

   confrontational course. `I'm not saying you are doing it now, but back

   then, when all these offences occurred, you were really into scanning

   telephone systems, be it voice mailboxes ... I'm not saying you found

   the 008s but you ... anything to bugger up Telecom. You were really

   getting into it and you were helping other people.'

  

   Anthrax took offence. `The motivation for me doing it wasn't to bugger

   up Telecom.'

  

   Sexton backpedalled. `Perhaps ... probably a poor choice of words.'

  

   He began pressing forward on the subject of hacking, something the

   police had not said they were going to be discussing. Anthrax felt a

   little unnerved, even rattled.

  

   Day asked if Anthrax wanted a break.

  

   `No,' he answered. `I just want to get it over and done with, if

   that's OK. I'm not going to lie. I'm not going to say "no comment".

   I'm going to admit to everything 'cause, based on what I have been

   told, it's in my best interest to do so.'

  

   The police paused. They didn't seem to like that last comment much.

   Day tried to clear things up.

  

   `Before we go any further, based on what you have been told, it is in

   your best interests to tell the truth. Was it any member of the AFP

   that told you this?'

  

   `Yes.'

  

   `Who?' Day threw the question out quickly.

  

   Anthrax couldn't remember their names. `The ones who came to my house.

   I think Andrew also said it to me,' he said, nodding in the direction

   of the red-headed constable.

  

   Why were the cops getting so uncomfortable all of a sudden? It was no

   secret that they had told both Anthrax and his mother repeatedly that

   it was in his best interest to agree to an interview.