Page 268


Undergound. Go to Table of Contents.

   of closure, of completing the circle.

  

   His interest in Islam found secular outlets. A giant black and white

   poster of Malcolm X appeared on Anthrax's bedroom wall. A huge photo

   of Los Angeles Black Panther leader Elmer Pratt followed soon after.

   The photo was captioned, `A coward dies a million deaths, a brave man

   dies but one'. The last bit of wall was covered in posters of hip-hop

   bands from ceiling to floor. A traditional Indian sword adorned the

   top of one of the many bookcases. It complemented the growing

   collection of books on martial arts. A well-loved copy of The Art of

   War by Sun Tzu sat on the shelf next to Homer's Ulysses, The Lord of

   The Rings, The Hobbit, a few old Dungeons and Dragons books, works of

   mythology from India and Egypt. The shelves did not contain a single

   work of science fiction. Anthrax shaved his head. His mother may not

   have been surprised by the conversion to Islam, but the head shaving

   went a bit over the top.

  

   Anthrax pursued NOI with the same vigour with which he attacked

   hacking. He memorised whole speeches of Farrakhan and began speaking

   like him, commenting casually on `those caucasian, blue-eyed devils'.

   He quoted people he had discovered through NOI. People who described

   the US Federal Reserve Bank as being controlled by Jews. People who

   spoke of those hooked-nose, bagel-eating, just-crawled-out-of-a-cave

   Jews. Anthrax denied the existence of the Holocaust.

  

   `You're shaping up to be quite a little Hitler,' his father told

   Anthrax.

  

   His father disliked the NOI literature showing up at the house. It

   seemed to frighten him. Receiving blueprints in the mail for

   overthowing governments didn't sit well with the neighbours in the

   quiet suburban street of the provincial town.

  

   `Watch out,' he warned his son. `Having these thing turn up in your

   mailbox can be dangerous. It will probably earmark you for some sort

   of investigation. They will follow you around.'

 

                            [ ]

  

   The traffic raced. The ethernet cables attached to System X were a

   regular speedway. People whizzed in and out of the mystery site like a

   swarm of bees. In only twelve hours, the sniffer file topped 100 k.

  

   Many of the connections went from System X to the major

   telecommunications company. Anthrax headed in that direction.

  

   He considered how to route the attack. He could go through a few

   diverters and other leapfrog devices to cover his trail, thus hitting

   the company's system from a completely separate source. The advantage

   of this route was anonymity. If the admin managed to detect his entry,

   Anthrax would only lose access to the phone company's system, not to

   System X. Alternatively, if he went in to the company through the

   gateway and System X, he risked alarms being raised at all three

   sites. However, his sniffer showed so much traffic running on this

   route, he might simply disappear in the flow. The established path was

   obviously there for a reason. One more person logging into the gateway

   through System X and then into the company's machine would not raise

   suspicions. He chose to go through System X.

  

   Anthrax logged into the company using a sniffed username and password.