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   `OK, folks. Here we go!' Phoenix said as he logged off.

  

   Phoenix dashed to the NASA computer, logged in and looked for the file

   named `d'. He couldn't find it. He couldn't even find the pub

   directory. He began hunting around the rest of the file system. Where

   was the damn thing?

  

   Uh oh. Phoenix noticed the system administrator, Sharon Beskenis, was

   still logged in. She was connected from Phoebe, another NASA machine.

   There was only one other user besides himself logged into the CSAB

   machine, someone called Carrie. As if that wasn't bad enough, Phoenix

   realised his username stood out a like a sore thumb. If the admin

   looked at who was on-line she would see herself, Carrie and a user

   called `friend', an account he had created for himself. How many

   legitimate accounts on NASA computers had that name?

  

   Worse, Phoenix noticed that he had forgotten to cover his login trail.

   `Friend' was telnetting into the NASA computer from the University of

   Texas. No, no, he thought, that would definitely have to go. He

   disconnected from NASA, bounced back to the university and then logged

   in to NASA again. Good grief. Now the damn NASA machine showed two

   people logged in as `friend'. The computer hadn't properly killed his

   previous login. Stress.

  

   Phoenix tried frantically to clear out his first login by killing its

   process number. The NASA computer responded that there was no such

   process number. Increasingly nervous, Phoenix figured he must have

   typed in the wrong number. Unhinged, he grabbed one of the other

   process numbers and killed that.

  

   Christ! That was the admin's process number. Phoenix had just

   disconnected Sharon from her own machine. Things were not going well.

  

   Now he was under serious pressure. He didn't dare logout, because

   Sharon would no doubt find his `friend' account, kill it and close up

   the security hole he had originally used to get in. Even if she didn't

   find Deszip on her own machine, he might not be able to get back in

   again to retrieve it.

  

   After another frenzied minute hunting around the machine, Phoenix

   finally unearthed Gandalf's copy of Deszip. Now, the moment of truth.

  

   He tried the passphrase. It worked! All he had to do

   was uncompress Deszip and get it out of there. He typed, `uncompress

   deszip.tar.z', but he didn't like how the NASA computer answered his

   command:

  

   corrupt input

  

   Something was wrong, terribly wrong. The file appeared to be partially

   destroyed. It was too painful a possibility to contemplate. Even if

   only a small part of the main Deszip program had been damaged, none of

   it would be useable.

  

   Rubbing sweat from his palms, Phoenix hoped that maybe the file had

   just been damaged as he attempted to uncompress it. He had kept the

   original, so he went back to that and tried decrypting and

   uncompressing it again. The NASA computer gave him the same ugly

   response. Urgently, he tried yet again, but this time attempted to