9.03 Franciscan Order

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The
Franciscans are a group of Roman Catholic religious orders who allegedly adhere to the teachings of Saint Francis of Assisi. They are comprises three separate groups, each considered a religious order in its own right (i.e., the Order of Friars Minor, most commonly referred to as the Franciscans, the Order of Capuchin Friars Minor, and the Secular Franciscan Order). The Franciscan coat of arms contains the Tau cross of Greece with two crossed arms depicting “Christ’s right hand with the nail wound and Francis’ left hand with the stigmata wound". Legend states that St. Francis referred to his followers as "Fraticelli", meaning "Little Brothers". This title is likely in respect to the Romans who interbred with the native giants of Greenland and therefore the Franciscans, which do their bidding, are little by comparison. In the Papal Bulls entitled "Gratias agimus" (1342) and "Nuper charissimae" (1342), Pope Clement VI declared the Franciscans the official custodians of the Holy Places (i.e., Israel). The Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land is still enforced to this today which suggests that the Franciscans, like a majority of Roman Catholic orders, consists of predominately Jewish Catholics. Other Franciscan-related orders and societies include but are not limited to: the Congregation of the Franciscan Hospitaller Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate, the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, the Franciscan Missionaries of Christ the King, the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, the Franciscan Missionaries of the Divine Motherhood, the Franciscan Missionaries of the Eternal Word, the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God,  the Order of Ecumenical Franciscans, the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, and the Poor Brothers of St. Francis.

Franciscans International
Franciscans International (FI) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) with general Consultative Status at the United Nations where it operates under the sponsorship of the Conference of the Franciscan Family (CFF) with headquarters in New York, Geneva, and Bangkok.  It admittedly “brings the spiritual and ethical values of the Franciscans to the United Nations”. Despite centuries of anti-human behavior, the vision of Franciscans International entails “A global community built on Franciscan values, in which the dignity of every person is respected; resources are shared equitably; the environment is sustained; and nations and peoples live in peace”.

Secular Franciscan Order
The
Secular Franciscan Order is a global Roman Catholic religious order derived from the Franciscan Order as a whole. They are tertiaries, or members of the Third Order of St. Francis that was allegedly founded by St. Francis of Assisi some 800 years ago. Originally known as the “Brothers and Sisters of Penance”, the Order is open to any Catholic not bound by religious vows to another religious order. Member of the Secular Franciscan Order include people such as Christopher Columbus, Louis IX of France, Louis Pasteur, Joan of Arc and Michelangelo, as well as 12 Bishops of Rome (i.e., Pope Benedict XV, Pope Clement XII, Pope Gregory IX, Pope Gregory X, Pope Innocent XII, Pope John XXIII, Pope Leo XIII, Pope Martin V,  Pope Pius X,  Pope Pius XI,  Pope Pius XII, and Pope Pius IX).

Order of Friars Minor Capuchin
The
Order of Capuchin Friars Minor is a global Roman Catholic religious order derived from the Franciscan Order as a whole. It was allegedly founded in 1520 by Matteo da Bascio who believed that the friars of his day were not living a life of solitude and penance like their Franciscan founder St. Francis of Assisi. According to legend, the Catholic Church tried to suppress his newfound convictions, forcing him into hiding to avoid arrest. Bacio and his followers were subsequently given refuge by the Camaldolese monks of Italy were they adopted the practice of wearing a beard and a hood (i.e., “cappuccio”), the mark of a hermit in that particular region of Italy. In reality however, the hood is likely symbolic of Greenland (home to the Roman Empire) which is considered the cap or hat of the Earth. Nevertheless, the Capuchin monkey and the cappuccino style of coffee are allegedly named after the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin. In time, a Capuchin college was founded in Rome for the purpose of “preparing their members for foreign missions” in Africa, America and Asia. Due to their allegedly “strong missionary thrust”, a large number of Capuchins suffered martyrdom (death) over the centuries. Translation: the Capuchins were used in various military operations around the globe, suffering heavy casualties. Capuchins answer to the Minister General (i.e., the Superior General) whose title is militarial in nature. As of December 2012, there were 10,286 Capuchins worldwide, 7,015 of whom were priests. They currently reside in 106 different countries within Africa (1,357), Asia-Oceania (2,339), Central-Eastern Europe (769), North America (664), South America (1,657), and Western Europe (3500). Lastly, the most famous of the Friars Minor Capuchin is St. Padre Pio who is worshiped like Jesus in parts of Italy.  

The Capuchin Crypt
The skeletal remains of some 4,000 Order of Capuchin Friars Minor are allegedly buried in an ossuary (i.e., “crypt”) under the Church of Santa Maria della Concezione in Rome, Italy. The underground crypt is divided into five chapels which are lit by a dim light that seeps through the cracks. Its walls and ceilings are decorated extensively with the skeletal remains, depicting various religious themes. The skeletal remains are arguably arranged in a very artful, boastful and disrespectful manner. Some of the skeletons are intact and draped with Franciscan habits (robes). The Italian church was reportedly commissioned in 1626 by Pope Urban VIII, an apparent tribute to the thousands of friars who died on behalf of the Roman Empire. According to legend, Pope Urban VIII’s brother, Cardinal Antonio Barberini, a member of the Capuchins, ordered the remains of thousands of Capuchin friars to be exhumed and transferred from the friary on the Via dei Lucchesi to the crypt in 1631. Whether the historical narrative regarding the creation of the crypt is true or just “urban legend” is not known, but it’s highly likely that it was created as cover for the thousands of blood sacrifices (i.e., “rites”) executed in the church by members of the Franciscan Order. Interestingly, the Order of Capuchin reportedly buried their dead with regularity under Santa Maria della Concezione, potentially inferring that human sacrifices have been taking place there for some time. The fact that the Capuchins come to “pray (prey) and reflect” in the church each night before retiring for the evening shows the sick and sadistic nature of the Order. An ominous plaque in the chapel states: “What you are now, we used to be. What we are now, you will be”.

Third Order of Saint Francis
The
Third Order of St. Francis is a global Roman Catholic religious order derived from the Franciscan Order as a whole. A Papal Bull from December 16, 1221 entitled “Potthast, "Regesta Pontificum” infers that the year 1221 was when the Third Order was officially instituted. The "Fioretti" suggest that Cannara, Italy was the birthplace of the Order. A parallel Third Order of Saint Francis (TSSF) exists in the Anglican Communion, alongside the 'Society of St Francis' and 'Community of St Francis' (the First Order Franciscans), and the 'Community of St Clare' (the Second Order Franciscan Sisters). The Lutheran Church (which was spawned by the Roman Catholic Church) coincidentally also features a Franciscan Order in the tradition of the Third Orders. The impact of the Franciscan Third Order Secular upon the feudal society of medieval Europe was “held to be considerable” due to the alleged prohibition of the Third Order from bearing arms. Translation: The Third Order was instrumental in arming both sides of the many conflicts and wars during the Middle Ages. In the early 20th century, the total number of Third Order members was estimated at roughly 2.5 million, globally. Consequently, the Order publishes 122 different monthly periodicals in almost every language. Secret societies and orders affiliated with or derived from the Third Order of Saint Francis include but are not limited to: Brothers and Sisters of Penance of St. Francis (1996), Brothers of St. Francis at Waldbreitbach (Unknown),  Capuchin Tertiary Friars (1889), Congregation of the Brothers of the Poor of St. Francis (1857), Felician Sisters (1855), Franciscan Apostolic Sisters (1953), Franciscan Brothers of Brooklyn, New York (1858), Franciscan Brothers of Ireland (Unknown), Franciscan Brothers of the Eucharist (1973), Franciscan Brothers of the Holy Cross (1862), Franciscan Brothers of Peace (1982), Franciscan Missionary Brothers of the Sacred Heart (1888), Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa (1952), Franciscan Missionary Sisters of St. Joseph (1883), Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart (1861), Franciscan Sisters, Daughters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (1860), Franciscan Sisters of Allegany (1857), Franciscan Sisters of Chicago (1894), Franciscan Sisters of Mary (1985), Franciscan Sisters of Mary Immaculate (1893), Franciscan Sisters of Our Lady of Perpetual Help (1901), Franciscan Sisters of Peace (1986), Franciscan Sisters of Penance and Christian Charity (1865), Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration (1849), Franciscan Sisters of St. Joseph (Unknown), Franciscan Sisters of St. Kunegunda (Unknown), Franciscan Sisters of the Eucharist (1973), Franciscan Sisters of the Poor (1868), Franciscan Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother (1873), Hospital Sisters of St. Francis (1875), Little Brothers of St. Francis (1970), Missionary Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate Conception (Unknown), Poor Brothers of St. Francis (1857), School Sisters of St. Francis (1873), Sisters of St. Francis (1851), Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi (1849), Sisters of St. Francis of Penance and Christian Charity (1874), Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia (Unknown), Sisters of St. Francis of Rochester, Minnesota (1877), Sisters of St. Francis of the Immaculate Conception (1890), Sisters of St. Francis of the Martyr St George (1869), Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis (1901), Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother (1883), Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis of Perpetual Adoration (1893), Society of St. Francis (1905), and The Poor Sisters of St. Francis Seraph of the Perpetual Adoration (1875),

Third Order Regular of St. Francis of Penance
The
Third Order Regular of St. Francis of Penance is a global Roman Catholic religious order derived from the Franciscan Order as a whole. It was founded in 1447 as a mendicant order rooted in the Third Order of St. Francis. It was originally organized in the Low Countries of France, Germany, and Italy. The habit (dress) of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis of Penance is that of the Conventuals. Like the other Franciscan orders, they are governed by the Minister General in Rome, Italy.